"Adding this one ingredient will give your dish a lot of depth.". What is depth? Can I taste depth?

"Adding this one ingredient will give your dish a lot of depth."

What is depth? Can I taste depth? How can I tell if something has too much or too little depth? What is depth?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You uncouth piece of vile waste. Have you no appreciation for a proper flavour spectrum? Leave this board at once

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    its usually vinegar i think

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I can't taste concepts, I can only taste chemicals
    No you can't, you autist. That's not how senses work. Do you have any idea how many layers of abstraction sensory information have passed through to be filtered for conscious analysis?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    "Depth" or "depth of flavor" is one of those phrases that's over-used and often mis-used. But basically what it means is that a bite of food with depth to it doesn't have just one solitary taste to it, but rather a variety of tastes that go well together. Like if you take a bite of cucumber it just tastes like cucumber, while if you put some vinaigrette on it first it tastes like cucumber and vinegar and herbs and pepper and so on.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Watch some homosexual on some food network channel running around like a chicken with it's head chopped off, then you'll learn the "depth of flavor" in all it's meaningless bullshit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's not what "depth of flavor means" at all. What you're describing is called "complexity of flavor". "depth of flavor" is invariably just referring to umami, it simply dates back to the era before umami was discovered as a distinct flavor.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's totally wrong. When chefs talk about depth of flavor they're talking about a bite that hits your whole mouth and not just one set of taste receptors.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You're going to get a lot of depth of flavor when my wiener hits your whole mouth.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's totally wrong. When chefs talk about depth of flavor they're talking about that deep savory richness that hits your umami taste receptors.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          you know what else hits your whole mouth? my ginormous grower of a circumcised israeli wiener. i will blow up your taste receptors like israel did al-shifa

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I would say it's an ingredient that suddenly, almost magically, makes a dish taste like more than the sum of its parts. As said, that usually ends up being an umami addition like MSG. But when I cook chili, it's often a weirder acid like apple cider vinegar or something weird and chinese (which, tbf, also probably has MSG in it).
        Like, you take a bite of whatever you're making and you feel 'oh, I can taste the spices, I can taste the tomatoes, I can taste this or that or the other'... but then you add that one ingredient and suddenly as if by magic, you taste the dish as a whole. At least that's how I think of it, maybe I'm just moronic.
        Oh and also, that one ingredient for chili? Fricking marmite (yeah umami again)

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          For me it's Colatura di Alici (yeah umami again)

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I prefer the word "savory" to "umami"

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              They aren't remotely the same thing. Savory simply means "not sweet". So while umami is savory, savory is not umami.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah but all the frickin chefs say umami constantly and it just sounds so pretentious. I’d be embarassed if I told people I cooked food for a living.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >umami is pretentious
                yeah almost as pretentious as "salty" and "sweet"

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    MSG

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I tasted a hint of anise in my Turkey cold cuts today

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what is garlic?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depth is when you can't immediately identify the flavors, it's the opposite of simplicity
    Picture the difference between a regular and very simple dish like a plain white sugar creme brulee
    Now make a creme brulee with vanilla, cardamom, saffron water, rose water, and turbinado sugar

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >What is depth?
    pic related

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Love these leafy little boys like you wouldn't believe.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    who cares
    put the ingredient in the food, taste it, see how it's changed, apply knowledge to future dishes
    just go fricking cook

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Lmao taste let doesn’t taste as good as us and can’t appreciate the MANY different flavors that we do.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I add a dwarf white star to my dishes, it falls through to the bottom of the universe, creating what is practically infinite depth.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How can the universe have a bottom

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        T=0

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