All-soup kitchen

Could a restaurant that only serves soups and fresh bread be viable? I considered including grilled cheese for the tomato soup, but then people would want all manner of sandwich.

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes these exist. They are called soup kitchens and they give soup and bread to homeless people.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah but could like, a for-profit one work?

  2. 2 months ago
    Google Operation Gladio / Strategy of Tension

    Yeah they're called Souplantation

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not a buffet though

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Jacques Pepin did it for a while in the 70s. Look up Le Potagerie New York.

    • 2 months ago
      Google Operation Gladio / Strategy of Tension

      >Jacques Pepin was the original Soup Nazi
      based

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Dude has had a very interesting life.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      OP I hope you call it “Sleurp” in his honor.

      What’s the price point? I’m personally shocked how expensive the deli soups are at the grocery store, and soup is often my favorite pet of eating out, but I don’t know if there’s a hurdle with value perception, and how to avoid being mainly a lunch place like sandwich shops are (a breakfast soup would be very interesting).

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I've wondered about this because Panera Bread somehow gets away with $8 bowls of chicken noodle.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Panera Bread somehow gets away with $8 bowls of chicken noodle
          No, they sell organic, free-range, artisinal chicken soup. Women but adjectives.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            *buy, not but

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            People that eat at panera bread genuinely think (or at least used to think) there was a kitchen hand-chopping carrots and deboning chicken. Back when I worked there people would make custom requests like we were a real restaurant. "Can I have just the dark meat? Can you chop the carrots thicker for me?"
            Bitch I'm cutting open this plastic bag, pouring it into a pot, and ladling out your bowl, go away.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Lower middle class gross office women think Panera and Olive Garden are unironically gourmet and genuinely believe everything is made to order. They also think they're "healthy" (LMAO)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Adding to this I thought about it a little more and what would you think OP about making savory bread puddings as well? Main purpose would be to use up leftover soup and bread, but it extends the menu with hopefully not too much extra effort, again uses up old soup, and potentially gives a refrigerated item that people could buy for reheating later. Plus you’d have the option of things like pairing a cheesy bread pudding with tomato soup, or french onion bread pudding with a beef stew.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's not a bad idea for getting rid of old bread. IIRC Panera bread just donates their bread leftovers to charity at the end of each business day but a non-national-franchise can't afford to do that just yet.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    there was one i went to like a decade or more ago. it was ok. went out of business eventually because. you are basically looking at panera as your business model. soups, breads, sandwiches, etc

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      But all of Panera Bread's soups and meats are frozen from their distribution factory, what about fresh soup?

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Such restaurants exist but it's a niche - definitely needs the proper location. I've been to one in Germany close to a university.
    They had like 6 regular soups and one or two which changed daily. Good fresh bread and they also had an all-you-can-eat option.
    Overall pretty affordable, definitely aimed at students and office workers looking for a quick warm meal.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    there's a restaurant that only serves soup and pir in my city and it's called soupie it's so dumb

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why would I buy your soup for 37 dollars when I can make 5 gallons of my own better soup for 5 dollars?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Because you're not retired or in high school

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        there is where you are wrong. he's both

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Meme magic can make it happen
          I still have dreams about high school, God damn
          >alright alright alright

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Could a restaurant that only serves soups and fresh bread be viable?
    The overhead costs of a brick and mortar restaraunt might be too much for running a soup op, but a food truck or cart would probably be willing to pull it off. Customers want something reasonably priced, delicious, fast, and at least quasi-healthy, so if you have a decent product in the right place, you could pull it off.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There was a small one in my town for a couple year ago that I loved. It got shuttered right after Corona hit in 2020. I think about it sometimes. They posted they might reopen sometime in the future somewhere else but that’s been nearly four years ago now. It hurts bros

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    https://ravisoup.com/
    literally exists tard

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    there was a shop like that in my old neighborhood. like six soups, 3 kinds of bread, and one sandwich option per day.
    pretty cozy. hard to sell that stuff in the summer though.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A good rule of thumb for pricing in restaurants is three times the cost of materials.

    Say you've got a pretty efficient set up and you make a few gallons of soup in one day. Where are you going to get the stock that's the base for your soup? Are you going to buy it from a wholesaler? Are you going to make it yourself? Are you going to source it locally and buy your stock at bulk prices from a butcher?

    If you're either going to buy it from a wholesaler, you might be able to keep the price down but people might not like the quality of your soup as a result. If you're going to make it yourself, a big portion of your time will be spent making stock, meaning you can sell less soup. If you buy it from your local butcher, the price might be so incredibly high that no one wants to buy your soup.

    Now that's just the stock. You're going to have to repeat these same questions for every single ingredient you plan on using. Not only that, but even if you take the previous rule of thumb, food tends to have extremely low margins which is why most restaurants don't make their money serving food. They make their money serving drinks. You're not going to be selling drinks if you're already selling soup.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      If you're running 33pct food cost, you'd better be talking high-end prices. I ran a bunch of corporate restos, 18-20pct was the norm. (Bennigans, Rainforest, Chili's and other shitholes.)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is from my experience working at restaurants in the Netherlands, almost all of which were independents. I wouldn't call most of them high-end by any means.

        18 to 20% sounds insane, though. I'm guessing a lot of it has to do with economies of scale and the bargaining power that large entities like these chainrestaurants have.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, it does. In the corporate restaurant world, margins at unit level are razor-thin. Unit level profit can be low single digits as a percent. The company makes its money on the payment terms negotiated with suppliers. For example, Rainforest wouldn't pay bills for 90 days. This gave the company 90 days to invest the sales dollars from the units.

          In most restaurant companies, the CFO is the most important person. Modern restaurant companies are really just sources of short-term investment capital.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There was (is?) a small chain called Hale and Hearty in NYC that was basically this, but I believe they went bankrupt and closed all their stores. Not really surprising, they were wildly overpriced and basically only existed for office drones that are all working from home now and presumably eating Campbell's they get on sale for $1

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Who cares? It seems like some west coast san franciso joint. As if that fag shit hasn't happened before.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Gb2/pol/

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's not /misc/ you idiot that's reality.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Oh.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah oh you dumbfuck.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Oh

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