Beginner tips?

Beginner tips?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is a fast food and shitposting board, the incels here have never even went outside.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I have experience in growing potatoes, tomatoes, onions, olives and grapes

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >using I-word

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Pretty big leap from cooking to farming. Why can't we have threads on growing herbs and tomatoes and shit, why does it always have to be either eating McDonald's every day or raising chickens in a bathtub in your apartment with no in between

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That's the demographic here. If you don't like it, find a forum for your own kind.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >That's the demographic here
          I highly doubt that.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    well what specifically are you asking about, first time small garden? adding animals and upgrading a garden? I'll assume new small garden
    use your lawn clippings as mulch. a good layer of mulch helps so much to retain moisture. it allows you to be so much lazier with watering and you'll barely have to weed. you'd have to be stupid not to use mulch, it's free
    sun is super important for most plants, so be very mindful if you're planting stuff alongside a house or garage that'll block a fair bit of sun. you'd be gimping peppers and tomatoes if you deprive them of afternoon sun
    uh, collect rain water in some capacity. don't need to go overboard, but it's convenient when you do need to water your stuff
    if you're in the north and usually have late and early frosts, start seeds indoors or else your plants might be just a bit immature for harvest when the first frost comes. especially for things like peppers and tomatoes

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Step one: let the chickens free range

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. If you are doing this to save money, quit right now.

    2. If you think you're going to have a mind-blowing flavor revelation, quit right now.

    3. Related to above, if you are growing heritage or native crops because you are expecting them to be flavorgasm superfoods, quit right now.

    Good luck.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Only #1 is sort of true. The rest is the result of someone who has never gardened before, is a tastelet, or failed badly at their own gardening endeavors.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Point 1 - True for things like potatoes, calorie dense foods. I spent $10 on garlic in 2019 and have grown over $300 worth of it a year every year since. Fert + water costs on the garlic are less than $100 a year, so in this case, I do save substantial money. I'd also say all herbs and even greens can be cost saving if you are lucky. I have massive aphid problems so it costs a lot to keep them at bay, making my kale a cost sink.

      2. Totally incorrect. Obviously someone who's never had a melon or tomato homegrown.

      3. I grow pink, striped black, yellow and orange tomatoes. I grow green ones that stay green when ripe, that taste like cantaloupe. Small orange currant ones taste like IPAs. Yellow ones Ive grown are all acid and no sweetness. Super sweet 100 are literally the best you can grow and almost nowhere sells them.

      >test the ph of your soil regularly and balance it according to what crops you want to grow (just because goat and chicken poo is good for your soil doesn't mean that too much won't screw things up)
      >rotate your beds with legumes or co-plant (for nitrogen fixation)
      >eggshells and coffee grounds are good for composting
      >raised beds will help with gophers
      >keep mousetraps or good barn cats around because the veggies and chicken feed will attract rodents
      >when your chickens stop laying in the winter, you can usually get them going again by giving them extra calcium or protein
      >prep your seedlings in small planters then transplant when they're hearty enough instead of just sticking them in the ground
      That's some of the advice I wish I'd known. Also,
      >if you're ever feeling discouraged about your garden, just plant climate appropriate melons or squash and give them plenty of water for a morale boost. Those things grow like crazy once they get going.

      Nitrogen fixation requires the plants roots to stay in the soil I think. So cut them dont pull them.

      Egg shells and coffee grounds are a 1-2year later fertilization. If you need calcium now because of blossom endrot, egg shells wont help until 2026.

      Melons in my experience are much harder to grow than lots of other things.

      Have your soil tested. It’s probably contaminated with heavy metals and nasty chemicals. Think about using planters. Keep in mind that this will be an expensive thing to get going, especially if your soul is contaminated and you need to buy planters and soil. Listen to the green text anons advice. He gave good information.

      >test the ph of your soil regularly and balance it according to what crops you want to grow (just because goat and chicken poo is good for your soil doesn't mean that too much won't screw things up)
      >rotate your beds with legumes or co-plant (for nitrogen fixation)
      >eggshells and coffee grounds are good for composting
      >raised beds will help with gophers
      >keep mousetraps or good barn cats around because the veggies and chicken feed will attract rodents
      >when your chickens stop laying in the winter, you can usually get them going again by giving them extra calcium or protein
      >prep your seedlings in small planters then transplant when they're hearty enough instead of just sticking them in the ground
      That's some of the advice I wish I'd known. Also,
      >if you're ever feeling discouraged about your garden, just plant climate appropriate melons or squash and give them plenty of water for a morale boost. Those things grow like crazy once they get going.

      soil PH and testing depending on where you are is good. If you make raised beds and buy your own soil you dont need to bother really.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Plow the fields thusly:

    □ □ □ □
    □□□ □□□
    □□□ □□□

    □□□ □□□
    □□□ □□□
    □ □ □ □

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm gonna plow your field

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Thank you. Can you disk it as well, please?

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Go to the homestead general in Culinaly

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >test the ph of your soil regularly and balance it according to what crops you want to grow (just because goat and chicken poo is good for your soil doesn't mean that too much won't screw things up)
    >rotate your beds with legumes or co-plant (for nitrogen fixation)
    >eggshells and coffee grounds are good for composting
    >raised beds will help with gophers
    >keep mousetraps or good barn cats around because the veggies and chicken feed will attract rodents
    >when your chickens stop laying in the winter, you can usually get them going again by giving them extra calcium or protein
    >prep your seedlings in small planters then transplant when they're hearty enough instead of just sticking them in the ground
    That's some of the advice I wish I'd known. Also,
    >if you're ever feeling discouraged about your garden, just plant climate appropriate melons or squash and give them plenty of water for a morale boost. Those things grow like crazy once they get going.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Have your soil tested. It’s probably contaminated with heavy metals and nasty chemicals. Think about using planters. Keep in mind that this will be an expensive thing to get going, especially if your soul is contaminated and you need to buy planters and soil. Listen to the green text anons advice. He gave good information.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Culinaly is technically the gardening board, but I'm pretty sure you can't just put chickens into raised 4x2 beds like that and expect them to grow just like plants.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hey, OP, sorry about all the homosexuals.

    [...]

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    human fertilizer is redpilled, based, and criminally underrated

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Doesn't that introduce pathogens into the soil that can contaminate your foods?

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the garden or chickens?
    cause the chickens are going to frick the garden up

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I recommend you getting hens for eggs and never for meat, God in heavens slaughtering and piecing the carcass is a pain in the, is not worth it imo just to eat some chicken, if you have to slaughter it just trade it alive with another fellow Farmer or pay him a little for the killing and clean up, I fricking hate doing that each time the hens are past their prime, and have in mind that raising birds is messier than it seems, they are prone to ticks, fleas, worms, flies, bumblefoot, animal attack, rooster b***hslapping them for no reason, tvey pecking themselves to death because who know thats why, weird dumb braindead critters I tell you

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >rooster b***hslapping them for no reason

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >rooster b***hslapping them for no reason
      I think that's a sign that they're over populated in a small space.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Set the chickens free wtf is that torture cage

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Let the chicken eat the bugs from your crops

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