Believe it or not, I actually never tried sushi. How would you raw fish connisieurs describe the taste.

Believe it or not, I actually never tried sushi. How would you raw fish connisieurs describe the taste. I'm inclined to try it out.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    neither have i, youre not fricking special.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you, your response means a lot to me.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Start with salmon, as it’s has a soft texture and mild taste.
    It tastes a bit creamy and melts in your mouth. It’s fresh. I can’t stand cooked fish, but I love raw salmon. Makes me understand bears.
    Then try tuna, which has a meatier taste

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So, each fish is going to differ in appearance and taste, and the amount of fat will also adjust the taste. I have nothing to compare it to, because I just identify it as tuna, eel, yellowtail, salmon, etc. Salmon is actually the strongest flavors of the fishes out there, and smoked salmon is even stronger. I do think most raw fish has subtle flavors that people might not pick up on. Octopus and squid are texture things - I do not recommend, they are weird feeling, and not worth the cost. Tuna is going to be better the deeper red it is. Salmon will be better the less white striations there are, and the deeper orange it is.

      Pretty delicate flavors for the most part. Tuna and salmon are buttery and soft. The shrimp has a light sweetness. Scallop os super soft and in a creamy dressing from what ive had. Mackerel is "fishy" but fresh, good if you like the smell of the seaside. Maybe try it seared first, as it'll be more familiar, but will still be 90% raw.

      Thanks. Me thinks gonna try.

      sushi isn't raw

      Uhm no, raw fish is, though.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Start with a nice California roll and see if you like it. The crab or imitation crab in them is fully cooked so you don't need to worry about any of that and it's a pretty mild but pleasant flavor. They're popular for a reason. After that you can start getting into some more traditional stuff.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do what this guy said, but in reverse: do tuna first. If you decide you like it, then try salmon: its texture is singular and may turn you off. I'd recommend tuna or spicy tuna roll as first try.

      Start with a nice California roll and see if you like it. The crab or imitation crab in them is fully cooked so you don't need to worry about any of that and it's a pretty mild but pleasant flavor. They're popular for a reason. After that you can start getting into some more traditional stuff.

      Obviously, you wouldn't start with Cali. roll, since it's just cooked crab and rice, which is not special, sushi, nor what comes to mind when people they think of raw fish.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sushi is different ways of using vinegared rice to express the flavor of other added ingredients. The added ingredients can be anything. Not necessarily sashimi. It's a good idea to start with added ingredients you're already used to, so you can more readily understand how the vinegared rice is affecting them.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          When people ask "Should I try sushi?" I can assure you, they're not thinking of trying out vinegared rice for the first time; they're thinking of raw fish. Noone who eats sushi goes, "Mmmm, you can just taste the vinegar in this rice!"

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So, each fish is going to differ in appearance and taste, and the amount of fat will also adjust the taste. I have nothing to compare it to, because I just identify it as tuna, eel, yellowtail, salmon, etc. Salmon is actually the strongest flavors of the fishes out there, and smoked salmon is even stronger. I do think most raw fish has subtle flavors that people might not pick up on. Octopus and squid are texture things - I do not recommend, they are weird feeling, and not worth the cost. Tuna is going to be better the deeper red it is. Salmon will be better the less white striations there are, and the deeper orange it is.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Incredibly bad opinions. Salmon with more white means it's more fatty which is ideal for flavor. Super orange salmon is almost certainly fed dyed food to get that color.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty delicate flavors for the most part. Tuna and salmon are buttery and soft. The shrimp has a light sweetness. Scallop os super soft and in a creamy dressing from what ive had. Mackerel is "fishy" but fresh, good if you like the smell of the seaside. Maybe try it seared first, as it'll be more familiar, but will still be 90% raw.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    sushi isn't raw

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it tastes wormtastic, am i right fellow parasiteheads

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Eel is by far the best fish to eat. It has a meaty taste to it. Tuna is next best. Salmon sucks.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Eel is amazing. Supposedly for sushi urchin is also top tier but of the dozen or so times I’ve ordered it only once has it been great, the other times it was kind of gross.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Try it. It's the only way of really knowing, and believe me, YOU WILL WANT TO KNOW.

    お寿司 is not just food, it's an experience. One quite unlike anything you've ever tried before. Just make sure you get it from a proper place: made by a Jaoanese chef, who has preferably trained under a master.

    Also, DO NOT DIP THE RICE IN SOY SAUCE. Be extremely conservative with しょうゆ, and when tipping, turn the にぎり upside down so that only the fish touches the sauce. Avoid 巻き rolls altogether; it's mostly a western thing.

    Eating raw salmon is a rather new thing even in Japan, and it does not hold the same traditional value as the other fish types.

    Don't leave any grains of rice on the plate as you finish; it is said that each grain of rice contains 800 spirits, according to traditional shinto beliefs. Regardless of your own beliefs this can be seen as very insulting to the establishment. Same thing with the しょうゆ.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >extremely conservative with しょうゆ,
      Sorry, I don't speak swirly.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Soy sauce, he's a ponce who wants to seem travelled and smart at the expense of the guy he's trying to teach.

        Try it. It's the only way of really knowing, and believe me, YOU WILL WANT TO KNOW.

        お寿司 is not just food, it's an experience. One quite unlike anything you've ever tried before. Just make sure you get it from a proper place: made by a Jaoanese chef, who has preferably trained under a master.

        Also, DO NOT DIP THE RICE IN SOY SAUCE. Be extremely conservative with しょうゆ, and when tipping, turn the にぎり upside down so that only the fish touches the sauce. Avoid 巻き rolls altogether; it's mostly a western thing.

        Eating raw salmon is a rather new thing even in Japan, and it does not hold the same traditional value as the other fish types.

        Don't leave any grains of rice on the plate as you finish; it is said that each grain of rice contains 800 spirits, according to traditional shinto beliefs. Regardless of your own beliefs this can be seen as very insulting to the establishment. Same thing with the しょうゆ.

        Very few people here can read nip, translate it homosexual.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Same jagoff in the miso thread.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Shōyu. Would have taken you 2 seconds to look it up, so be grateful that I'm doing this much for you.

        Soy sauce, he's a ponce who wants to seem travelled and smart at the expense of the guy he's trying to teach.
        [...]
        Very few people here can read nip, translate it homosexual.

        See above. If you want to bastardize the most sophisticatee culinary tradition in existence that's your problem, I choose to keep things accurate whenever possible.

        >Regardless of your own beliefs this can be seen as very insulting to the establishment.
        Yeah, idgaf about that. I pay for stuff, I do what I want with stuff.

        That's a perfectly reasonable standpoint.

        In the west.

        Japanese culture values respect above all else. If you're not willing to accept that you should not expect to freely take part in all that they have to offer.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Holy shit dude, go wax your butthole and stop acting hoighty toighty about raw fish on a cantonese cormorant fishing forum.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Try it. It's the only way of really knowing, and believe me, YOU WILL WANT TO KNOW.

          お寿司 is not just food, it's an experience. One quite unlike anything you've ever tried before. Just make sure you get it from a proper place: made by a Jaoanese chef, who has preferably trained under a master.

          Also, DO NOT DIP THE RICE IN SOY SAUCE. Be extremely conservative with しょうゆ, and when tipping, turn the にぎり upside down so that only the fish touches the sauce. Avoid 巻き rolls altogether; it's mostly a western thing.

          Eating raw salmon is a rather new thing even in Japan, and it does not hold the same traditional value as the other fish types.

          Don't leave any grains of rice on the plate as you finish; it is said that each grain of rice contains 800 spirits, according to traditional shinto beliefs. Regardless of your own beliefs this can be seen as very insulting to the establishment. Same thing with the しょうゆ.

          i have no time for shinto nonsense

          japan is a vassal state of america, i will eat their sushi as i please

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Let me show you our restroom then.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Regardless of your own beliefs this can be seen as very insulting to the establishment.
      Yeah, idgaf about that. I pay for stuff, I do what I want with stuff.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You're the kinda customer we spit in your soup (and we do) leave a tiny tip, we still have the last laugh haha.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Hey free spit! I hope it's a girls spit!

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            the spit frees the sushi

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Shōyu. Would have taken you 2 seconds to look it up, so be grateful that I'm doing this much for you.

      [...]

      See above. If you want to bastardize the most sophisticatee culinary tradition in existence that's your problem, I choose to keep things accurate whenever possible.

      [...]

      That's a perfectly reasonable standpoint.

      In the west.

      Japanese culture values respect above all else. If you're not willing to accept that you should not expect to freely take part in all that they have to offer.

      10/10

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do you like fish? If yes, you will probably like sushi. That's about all that needs to be said. If you ever hear anyone say any of this unironically, kick them in the gonads.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's cold and feels like it came from a cafeteria most of the time

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't like sushi but my best friend works at a sushi restaurant so I've eaten gross amounts of everything. Raw octopus is the only thing I have a hard time with. Everything else is easy to chew on. My advice is if you don't like a roll, dip it in soy sauce with wasabi and swallow it before you can gag.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >My advice is if you don't like a roll, dip it in soy sauce with wasabi and swallow it before you can gag.

      I gagged just reading this.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      have you ever thought of asking for a bowl of ramen instead?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        They always serve me a bowl of ramen would be weird to ask for two bowls.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Free Sushi is Free.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Most will taste pretty much the same when you start and generally won't taste "fishy" at all. Cooked salmon and tuna taste for fishy than raw. Some others like Mackerel (Saba) and Urchin (Uni) are much stronger. Just order takeout, get a specialty roll since they are tasty and have a bunch of sauce, but then just order 6pc assorted nigiri on the side so you can actually sample the fish. If you like it and start gaining confidence you can sit down at a sushi bar and order omakase which is fun because the chef will just serve you whatever he thinks is best for that night until you're full. You'll have to learn etiquette for it otherwise they'll screw you over, here's a good intro video:

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >dunk the entire nigiri into the soy sauce
      I have heard the opposite to only put the fish on the sauce and putting the rice in is wrong. However I only ever eat at American restaurants or eat super market sushi (and don't use soy sauce anyway). I just dab some wasabi on the fish and eat it fish side down. Is that salt thing for real?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Disregard that video completely. It aims to make a mockery of Japanese traditions, and the anon posting it is simply trying to troll you into thinking it's a serious introduction to お寿司屋 manners.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    its hard to describe it because nothing else is really like sushi/sashimi. People can pay like $40 for a sushi meal for a reason. Its not fishy either, well, not in a bad way. Buttery and fatty that makes your tastebuds go 'ohhhh i like this'. For the rest of the not so premium fare its like little morsels you dip in the wasabi.

    quality matters. You don't want the cheapest dogshit gas station sushi, but theres no need to pay top dollar, either. Supermarket sushi from a mid range store is good enough.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      something like this is 10 bucks and its 'good enough' for regular fare.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the rice cooks the egg

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's okay.
    I wouldn't go out of my way to eat it.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I love sushi

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    buttery and melty

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