BIG PAN CLUB (12 inch+)

Do you have a skillet or frying pan larger than 12 inches? What do you use it for? I just got this #12 Lodge (14 inch) on impulse, and feel like it's way too big to really take advantage of. Aside from just increasing the quantity of food I'm making by 50%, are there any foods I can make in it that I can't make in a 12 inch pan?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Big pizzas
    Big bread loaves

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Pretty much and roasting(but you can still do this in a 12 inch anyway lol). Anything larger than 12 inches becomes a pain to get even heat since most stovetop burners are too small to heat the whole diameter properly(CI is okay since you can move around the pan to preheat the whole thing but other types of pans it becomes more of a pain)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, I would think that a 14" pan would be best to fully utilize on a grill where you could fit multiple steaks in it at once.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        For this reason OPs big pan should work effectively as a wok too if heating just in the center

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Wouldn’t it heat more evenly on gas?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Depends on the type of gas burner but yes

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    holy shit, big pan. pan pizza

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I require big pans for most meals because I am not single and childless.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ding! I have three teenage boys. 14 inch pan my wife calls the sewer cover cooks a lot of meals.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    12.5in Hestan ProBond so technically I can post in this thread. I don't really use it for anything special, it's just nice for making big batches of saucey pasta and what not. I use it for roasting chickens sometimes as well. The high sides make it easier to tip the pan and baste the dripping on top of the chicken.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I guess I also prefer it over my 12in Lodge if I'm searing large quantities of small things like chicken thighs. I like cast iron for searing larger things like steaks or roasts since it has better heat retention.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I own a 42 cm carbon steel pan but rarely use it at all.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I usually own a couple of 5qt skillets. At the moment, I have a large cast iron, a one-pot kind of wok sloping sides skillet, and a good nonstick with the circulon kind of raised bottom. These pots also have glass lids, which I enjoy for dinners where I add rice to my main in the same pot.

    This pan used to be called a chicken fryer by some people, and it has higher sides not just the larger volume, and good surface area in the bottom for say 4-6 large pork shops, 4 pounded cube steaks or big veal snitzels, and lots of large batch frying like potato pancakes or fried green tomatoes. The higher sides keeps my other burners cleaner from splatters, and increases browning.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have a huge 2 handle cast iron I for roast veggies and a huge stainless skillet for misc dishes. I don't use them everyday, but I cook for my family often, so I make large dishes then

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >tfw only 11.8in
    King of the panlets

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My Grandmother has a vintage 16", but it basically never gets used, far too large for practical everyday usage.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Aside from just increasing the quantity of food I'm making by 50%, are there any foods I can make in it that I can't make in a 12 inch pan?
    Anything that requires more "pan real estate" before the recipe is complete will be able to be cooked in batches.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not really. Cooking in batches takes longer, sometimes almost double the time for some recipes. Being able to whip out a big pan full of spaghetti carbonara is way simpler and quicker than cooking two pans.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Being able to whip out a big pan full of spaghetti carbonara
        Why would you need a wide pan for this, instead of just using a taller saute pan of 11-12 inches in diameter?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You can't really toss the pasta with a taller saute pan the same way you can with a skillet. With a saute pan you would basically just be throwing the pasta up and slapping it back down in the pan, where with a wider skillet you can toss the pasta, folding it over itself and helping emulsify the sauce. You could just stir vigorously to emulsify in a saute pan, but that takes more time and effort. Honestly a saucier pan would be perfect, but I don't make large batches of sauces that would benefit from a saucier often enough to justify the cost of a large one.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            What about a wok? I've never made spaghetti carbonara, but it sounds like making Pad Thai.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Do you have a skillet or frying pan larger than 12 inches?
    Yes.

    >What do you use it for?
    Beating my husband.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    We have a pair of "two burner" griddles that see some occasional action and a paella pan that's still unused. idk how big our workhorse pans are. I'm not sure what 12 inches is.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I'm not sure what 12 inches is.
      30 commie meters

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        lol
        No, I got that. I just can't generally imagine how big or small that is. I think our two main pans are bigger but I can't be sure.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Do you own a ruler or measuring tape? Go measure the pans you use and see if they are different or the same.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Sure.
            I'll do that later. Kitchen is in use right now and I'm "watching" Hilda with my kid.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Two pans are 12", a skillet and the other is a ________ (idk the word in English; more like a very short pot with two ear-like handles instead of one long one), another is 11 or 12 depending on how you measure (sloping saute pan) and the last is a 14"er.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                In America we tend to measure by the rim. A typical 10.5" cast iron pan will usually have around an 8" cooking surface, and an 8" skillet will have even less. In case you or anyone else is curious.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Nifty

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                The word is sautuese but it goes by other names too

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I just can't generally imagine how big or small that is.
          Banan for scale, or roughly twice the length of the average penis.
          >sorry bros 5.5 is not average unless you live in Asia or something.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I can't use pans that big due to the size of my hobs' hotspot, but when I think "giant skillet" my first thought is that you have room to fry an entire chicken at once without crowding the pan and ruining the "crispiness". Specifically this Alton Brown video came to mind.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      1. he's using a 10 inch skillet
      2. fried foods are something most people do in batches, no matter the size of the pan because of how much the temperature drops when you start adding food

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >1. he's using a 10 inch skillet
        Disregard. Just looking at the perspective again, I think it's a 12 inch skillet. Still, not excessively large, and (2) still stands. It's weird to me how he took the thermometer out of the oil after he put the food in. I always keep a thermometer in the oil the whole time while deep frying, and the temperature would drop by around 75-100 degrees after he put in that much chicken.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        1. That is clearly a 12-inch pan
        2. The advantage of a larger skillet would be not having to fry in batches, a benefit in itself
        3. The video already highlights steps to account for the heat lost when adding food to a skillet at-temperature
        4. The larger pan's greater thermal mass would make the relative heat-loss less significant, not to mention only having to account for this once, due to NOT frying in batches

        Listen, I'd never own a 14 inch skillet because I'd never use it. But this seems like one case where it would have a distinct advantage. Name your own.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    when i went to target the butthole employees didn’t let me buy a bigger pan

    what do i even do

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      you

      https://i.imgur.com/NTmKHuA.jpg

      Do you have a skillet or frying pan larger than 12 inches? What do you use it for? I just got this #12 Lodge (14 inch) on impulse, and feel like it's way too big to really take advantage of. Aside from just increasing the quantity of food I'm making by 50%, are there any foods I can make in it that I can't make in a 12 inch pan?

      the guy she told you not to worry about
      addicted to big black pans

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      target employees know how to treat cucks since they're their typical customers

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes. Paella and, yes, french fries, that's how I do them with just a couple inches of oil.
    >inb4 Las paelleras jesus!

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Paella, if you're making it correctly, needs to be spread out in a really big pan. This would be the correct pan to use for that. It's also good for baking poultry, pizza, or cornbread. It's also good for searing a steak because it's bigger and has more thermal mass than a small pan.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      question - why IS paella made in such large pans? besides just, it being made in large quantities.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Because it's traditionally a meal you make at family gatherings and church during lent. In modern times it has become more of a street vendor type of food. They do sell smaller paella pans as well but it's not as common, also one advantage for a larger pan is you get more soccarat

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >paella
          >at church during lent
          lol
          lmao even

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        More ratio of crust

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i got a nice thick 12 incher, i like it for curries and stir fries

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