Bulgur is the most under-appreciated side dish ever

Bulgur is the most under-appreciated side dish ever

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    *notices ur bulgur* oWo

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >b-baka it's not the noticeable >M<
      > is it? O_o

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >side dish
    ?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yes, it's underrated

      my thought too, but what else would one call it? the fricking 'carb'? neeeh get a f*ck out of her ahahahaha

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Matgeek homie scove

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >neeeh get a f*ck out of her ahahahaha

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Gleefully weeps the bedighted pallid poet, compared to thee but a sigh! Forbidding, intractable, forgives but for an eye!

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >what else would one call it?
        I... don't... know...
        To me, it's just an ingredient and I can only thing of one side dish my Durkastani Gran used to make with it, stuffed carrots. Everything else was either a main or a starter.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          carrots
          what
          did she carve the carrot cores out and stuffed them with bulgur?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes. Common side dish in Durkastani homes. It's not something you'll find in restaurants. The carrots are glazed in pomegranate syrup and either lemon juice or a mix of tamarind paste + water. In old country, they use "winter carrots" for them because whole carrots are grown and eaten year round, they're at their largest in the colder months and therefore easiest to hollow, which you do by steaming or parboiling just enough so that they're easily hollowed out.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              That sounds very good

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It's pretty good. Everyone has their own method. Most use rice. My Gran used burghul. Some add tomato paste to the glaze. Some make it vegetarian. Some use vinegar instead of tamarind or lemon. Etc etc etc
                The only constant is that the preferred carrots are the black type. If you're abroad, those can be hard to find so many Durkastanis in other countries use purple carrots or even standard-ass orange ones to make it.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >pomegranate syrup
              I picked up some of this stuff at a local Turkish market and by god is it tasty
              It makes such a delicious vinaigrette with red wine vinegar, olive oil, and a pinch of salt

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    WON'T

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Looks like Indian food

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's Bulgurian.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Burgers are supposed to be served on buns dummy

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That looks delicious. What is it please?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Afelia, dish from Cyprus

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Looks great. I want to try making it.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Very healthy and goes so well with meats, especially lamb and beef.
    One of my favorite grains.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ever since I found out it exists, I haven't bought any rice for myself since. Bulgur has amazing amount of fibers and protein.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    that looks like actual shit YEAH

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That is the weirdest looking bulgoki I have ever seen G

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      No fricking banchan, either

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ingredients
    3 dl bulgur
    water with 1 vegetable stock cube
    1 fried chicken, cut into small pieces
    200 g crumbled or diced feta cheese
    1 peeled cucumber, cut into pieces
    1 peeled finely chopped red onion
    1 dl chopped parsley leaves

    Ajvar vinaigrette:
    5 tbsp olive oil
    2 tbsp white wine vinegar
    3 tbsp mild or strong ajvar relish
    0.5 tbsp honey
    0.5 tsp salt

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    frick yeah dude
    I love bulgur, specifically very coarse bulgur, the coarser the better imo
    I do a 2:1 liquid to bulgur in my rice cooker and it comes out perfect when using the "white rice" setting
    for liquid I do chicken broth and a big squirt of tomato paste
    I also throw some cloves of raw garlic in the bottom and they get nice and soft by the end
    Aleppo pepper or Pul Biber is also a must have in this dish

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I like tabbouleh but I haven't really done a lot else with bulgur to honest

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    boogers cannot sustain a man

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