Chefpill me on medieval cuisine.

Chefpill me on medieval cuisine.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    very, very limited ingredients.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That’s not a bad thing tbh

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Thats a good thing

        i never said it was a bad thing

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Nobody said you said it was a bad thing. Any other problem argumentative homosexual?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Hey simmer down frickface you talk to ya mudah like this?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              you kiss your dad with that mouth?

              Whenever i encounter argumentative people i immediately know theyre below me on the pecking order

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                no one is being argumentative you schizo.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Keep arguing monkey

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                arguments require a back and forth conversation.
                dont use words you dont understand anon.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah pal when you encounter these nuts in your face you can get below and gobble them up.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                https://i.imgur.com/VNal0dB.jpg

                arguments require a back and forth conversation.
                dont use words you dont understand anon.

                >I HAVE TO BE RIGHT OR IT WILL HURT MY SELF ESTEEM
                laffing

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I got some esteem right here for ya open wide hehe

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                no one mentioned anything about being right
                are you creating fake arguments in your head anon?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Go back to /k/, glowie Ukraine shiil

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            you kiss your dad with that mouth?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thats a good thing

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Tell me one thing you can get today, but couldn't during medieval times. Not counting oriental things.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        dr pepper

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You could get the ingredients to make it, though. But that's besides the point; medieval implies European and we don't drink slop.

          Any of the Columbian exchange ingredients

          >Not counting oriental things

          lemur meat

          Lemurs existed a thousand years ago. I have also never actually seen this being sold in a grocery store.

          Tomatoes

          Also existed a thousand years ago.

          dodo meat

          Quite the opposite, that is impossible to get today but not back then. If anything there were more options during medieval times than today.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >If anything there were more options during medieval times than today
            You clearly never lived during medieval times.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              No shit dumbass

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >You clearly never lived during medieval times.
              I was there last week

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >if you don't count oriental ingredients, or american ingredients or plants and animals that would be 4000km away or fruits or vegetables that don't grow in the region you're in, or all the food thats out of season most of the year, or many of the spices that were prohibitively expensive at the time and anything thst requires a refinement process that didn't exist you wouldn't be missing out
            it would be unreasonably hard to get even white bread unless you were a extremely rich and even then you would only eat it on special occasions

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            you are trying too hard

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Also existed a thousand years ago.
            But wasn't introduced to the Europe until the 16th century after the Spanish colonized parts of America. Not nearly "a thousands years ago."
            Why are you being a disingenuous homosexual that's trying to act like a community college professor?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Any of the Columbian exchange ingredients

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You could get the ingredients to make it, though. But that's besides the point; medieval implies European and we don't drink slop.

          [...]

          >Not counting oriental things

          [...]

          Lemurs existed a thousand years ago. I have also never actually seen this being sold in a grocery store.

          [...]

          Also existed a thousand years ago.

          [...]

          Quite the opposite, that is impossible to get today but not back then. If anything there were more options during medieval times than today.

          >Not counting oriental things
          what the frick are you talking about. do you not know what the colombian exchange was?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Assuming you mean the Columbian exchange, yes, I know what that is. That wasn't during medieval times, and I chose to omit oriental goods from the question because onviously transportation would be a huge issue.

            >If anything there were more options during medieval times than today
            You clearly never lived during medieval times.

            True, I didn't. But I know for a fact that the dodo is extinct today and wasn't 1000 years ago.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >I know for a fact that the dodo is extinct
              Yeah that's what they keep saying about Bigfoot too.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >That wasn't during medieval times

              That's exactly the point you fricking moron.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Medieval reenactor here. I've been a cook on médiéval camp for 10 years now. My time period is from 1350 to 1450 in France (black plague, Jeanne d'Arc, battles between armagnac and bourguignons ...). So end of middle ages and starts of artillery.

          >inb4 I'm a fricking ESL frog, sorry for the broken English.

          Where to start... food is far from being bland. everything was cooked with spices or stuffs that added flavor like salt, long pepper and for the bourgeois and nobles , cinnamon, saffron, pepper and ginger. And when I say pepper, it's a ton of pepper.

          Some sauces were based on verjus (unripped grape juice) which is horribly sour and tart, so we tended to replace it with vinegar which is milder.

          Lots of sweet stuffs involve frying, sage and wine. You make batter with flour, sage and white wine and fry it. It's delicious.

          People liked to mix sugar and salt. For example, the "porée blanche". It's fricking disgusting and a waste of money since it's basically a wheat gruel with lots of onions and leeks and ... A shiton of almond powder. It's really not palatable for the palate of our times, or you need to be very "curious"

          A good concept I like in médiéval cooking is that they tried to take as much flavour from meats as they can. Take the comminée de poulaille.
          You boil a whole chicken with condiments (onion, leek, carotte, white carrot or parsnip). When done, you use the stock for other shits and the chicken is cut in smaller pieces and fried in tallow or pork fat. Must admit it taste pretty good.

          Other than that. We try to make historically compatible recipes such as "carbonade flamande". Which is just a beef stew with brown wheat beer, mustard and "pain d'épices".

          And of course, as said, no food from Americas (potatoes,
          Officially, afaik, in Europe, middle ages starts after the vikings migration in France and england and ends in 1492 with the discovery of americas

          Sorry for reddit spacing.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Thanks for the story. Are there any pretty girls at these reenactments?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              actually according to my ex girlfriend who suffered horrific trauma at the hands of her sick sick extended family (who all work at defense contractors and in law enforcement, and are regarded as pillars of their community, go figure), renaissance fairs are dens of child sex trafficking.

              i think most of it is regarded as wink wink nudge nudge swinger lifestyle like RV vagabond boomers, albeit with a bdsm roleplay edge (think women dressed as wenches etc), but apparently there's a much darker subculture for the people raised in it

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Do you really think an American Renaissance Fair is what Anon is talking about when he says it's a medieval reenactment in central France? Not saying it couldn't be a den of debauchery, but it's probably not what your ex was telling you about.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Tu es d'où ?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Je suis dans la région centre. Si t'as telegram, je peux te filer mon @ (c'est @harlekiin). Et toi, t'es d'où ?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                wee wee i am a gonna send youa a "dick pick" oh mone me mooseswa hehehe

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            very interesting satan, thanks for being the only person with good input in this thread

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Very nice post.

            >reddit spacing
            newbie meme, newbie.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            a nice read, thank ye heretic

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >You make batter with flour, sage and white wine and fry it. It's delicious.
            Frenchbro, if you come back and read this I want the recipe for it.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Thats the recipe. Do you need handholding how much to add per serving?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                no need to be rude, frog

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                yes

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The use of wine in medieval cooking really surprised me at first.
            I thought beer was a lot more popular, but it turns out that is kinda recent. Instead they use wine even more than the modern French or Italians do. Wine isn't just a marinade or part of a sauce, but it is a flavoring all of its own.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            French Satan here. ( OP from )
            Picrel Here is a "poulet a la ficelle" i did several years ago. I but tarragon butter between the skin and the meet and i sealed the skin with thread. I stuffed it with an onion, 2 cloves of garlic, Thyme, Sage and bayleaf. That took forever to cook at low heat, like 4 hours, but the meat was wonderful, it's a delicacy.

            I also made "rillons" (slowly fried pork belly", that melt in the mouth.

            Thanks for the story. Are there any pretty girls at these reenactments?

            >Thanks for the story. Are there any pretty girls at these reenactments?
            There are some. It's not like the RenFair from the US, there is mostly no fantasy bullshit. You can find some "younglings" troups where the age is between 20's and 30's, where you have some pretty cuties. But i think 50% of them are fricked up in the head with daddy or rape issues ... Hell, I remember having to push away a 15 years old girl from me who was heating up on me. She made out with a 35 yo guy later this day and it threw a drama in the campements. She also kissed (like french kissed) a 65 yo guy who was larping a Santiago de compostelle pilgrim from the middle ages.
            so yeah,

            Do you really think an American Renaissance Fair is what Anon is talking about when he says it's a medieval reenactment in central France? Not saying it couldn't be a den of debauchery, but it's probably not what your ex was telling you about.

            is Right but as i said, there are some problematic behaviour. But maybe less than in the larping community.

            >You make batter with flour, sage and white wine and fry it. It's delicious.
            Frenchbro, if you come back and read this I want the recipe for it.

            The recipe is "Brugnes à la sauge"
            https://www.jackiecuisine.com/brugnes-sauge/
            For 8 people
            1 bunch of fresh sage from the garden for me
            1 tbsp of honey
            100g of flour
            1 egg
            5 cl of white wine
            A little water to dilute the paste

            Cooking: 30 mins
            • In a salad bowl put the flour, make a small well and add the egg, honey and chopped sage.
            • Finish with white wine and water
            • Mix everything to obtain a smooth paste.
            • Prepare a fry in a large pot.
            • Drop a tablespoon of dough into the hot oil.
            • Brown, be careful it goes very quickly.
            • Drain the brugnes on absorbent paper.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              cimer chef

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Poulets. When will they learn?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            here again

            The use of wine in medieval cooking really surprised me at first.
            I thought beer was a lot more popular, but it turns out that is kinda recent. Instead they use wine even more than the modern French or Italians do. Wine isn't just a marinade or part of a sauce, but it is a flavoring all of its own.

            They used apples or pears a lot like a vegetables, since they had variety that were far more hard. they had to cook it like quinces and it acted like potatoes or parsnip in a stew, adding a slight perfume. I used to make morteau sausages cooked in wine and "hard" apples.

            You remind me of another medieval dish

            Poires au sirop selon Harleian (XV°)
            1 kg cooking pear
            600 g red wine
            200 g sugar
            1 tsp wine vinegar
            2 teaspoon cinnamon
            1/2 teaspoon ginger
            1/8 crushed cloves
            1 pinch of saffron

            -Mix the wine and cinnamon, leave to rest for 30 minutes and pass through cheesecloth several times.
            -Heat the wine with the sugar until the consistency of a syrup.
            -Peel the pears, cut them into quarters then poach them (30 mins) in this simmering “syrup” (if Williams type pears poach for 10 mins).
            -Add ginger, saffron and cloves (possibly vinegar) and let the pears cool in their “syrup”

            • 2 months ago
              Fledgling Investor

              You still have similar dishes to this day. See Normandy, Bretagne, Rhineland etc.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        lemur meat

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Tomatoes

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        dodo meat

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Fresh meat/fruits/vegetables any time of the year.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >NOOOOOOO YOU CAN'T JUST... WANT SPICES!! THATS FRICKING CHEATING Y-YOU MERCHANT

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Not counting oriental things.
        Why this stipulation?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        gamer girl bathwater (that i use to boil glizzies) hehe

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Honest answer - tomatoes. No tomatoes would be rough. I'd also miss peppers, but not as much as tomatoes.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Potatoes.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        A hot shower.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        A smallpox vaccine

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        a hard on in an elevator

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not true at all, they used an entirely different set of local ingredients that we've replaced with monoculture and homogenized bullshit. When was the last time you cooked with Sorrel? When was the last time you ate a Pawpaw or a Ramp?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah agree with this. Lots of knowledge has been lost, unironically by the general population. Theyve wholly embraced the kool aid. The upper class are the ones who try to hang on to these pass down wisdom.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          The upper class gonna get guillotined real fricking soon bro

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Pawpaw and ramp wasn't available to medieval Europeans anon. And I eat all of those things regularly because I'm a foragechad.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I was giving an American analogous ingredient because they're very regional and known well in those parts but iv you go to a city nearby chances are most people have never heard of them.

          There's a bunch of communities in Asia and the Global South that still know their local ingredients. Especially in Rural China, those frickers eat the weirdest things and I'm about it. I'm talking mountain vegetables that look like alien creatures.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Pawpaw is being sold in supermarkets here. Sorrel is at least common enough as an ingredient that I immediately thought of it as something to eat. Even though I can't recall whether I have eaten it before.
        You should touch grass and try to get into the forage hobby.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They used more herbs than you can name spices

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        i can name more herbs than i can spices

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      this
      salt was only for royalty

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >salt was only for royalty
        You're probably thinking of black pepper
        Salt was a common preservative, even among peasants. That said it wasn't cheap, and it was susceptible to taxes (which hit poor people the most), but it wasn't anything super expensive like cinnamon or saffron
        A lot of peasants also figured out how to get their own (like boiling sea water), so there were workarounds even if you were super poor.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Salt was a common preservative, even among peasants.
          I highly doubt there was any civilization in Europe in the medieval ages aside from Italy

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hunters stew is where it's at. Could be anything in that pot.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    didn’t read thread. go to medical times. gets trashed, preferably before hand or in the parking lot. got buck wild

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You'd make stews and sauces out of questionable plants that were eventually replaced by more palatable and less toxic alternatives, and thicken them with tough stale bread that was abundant due to lack of preservatives, lack of storage technology, and use of cheap non-wheat ingredients.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >eat stews constantly with stale bread
      That sounds friggin' based!

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bland, or at best, limited to dry, seasonal tubers unless you were a merchant or higher status and could afford spices and/or butter/eggs. People's roofs of their mouthes were constantly cut, burnt and lacerated from crusty breads and overcooked meats. Bread had sand and gravel in it to crack the seeds and whole grains most people ate.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    For the poor, salty unless you add fruit. Rich people had access to more elaborate concoctions and recipes that included almond milk and fruit.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It was nasty shit but you probably didn't realize it was nasty then.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There's a lot of europoor dishes that are basically unchanged from medieval times. Lots of stews and porridges. There are a bunch of dishes from northern Spain that are basically medieval perpetual stews such as cocido montanes or lebaniego. It's a base of onion, garlic, carrot and collard greens stewed down into a stock with some chickpeas or lentils, black pudding, pork sausage and ribs thrown in.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They did unholy things with cinnamon.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      qrd?

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Chefpill me on medieval cuisine.
    The average person would just eat bread 95% of the time
    (You) NEET fricks would eat nothing and die after a week.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    main purpose of pepper and spices was to hide the flavour of spoiled meats

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Europe isn't India. Europeans figured out several preservation methods. Like smoking, salting and....leaving the animals alive until you need them.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      post brown paw

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Medieval cuisine is fricking exquisite. Reminds me of my time in Iraq..
    >driving forward in my stryker
    >fighters flying overhead
    >artillery crashing left and right
    >buds hanging out, chillin
    >wearing my oakleys
    >chewing gum and kicking ass
    >the adrenaline, the excitement, the fricking coolness of it all
    >knowing we're liberating freedom for a bunch of people
    >finally the vanguard stops, vehicle pulls over
    >ruck out time
    >do an op and return back home to base
    >chill and listen to some based early 2000s music
    >eat a slice of pizza hut brought to base camp by american logistics
    >thegoodlife.jpg

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Seasonal foods
    >Bread bread and more bread
    >Herbs and spices in everything and grown in your own gardens
    >No access to exotic foods obviously and tomato's depending where you are in the world
    >Mostly vegetables
    >Potential chance of a bad harvest where you could starve to death
    >Calling birds and everything you saw near water one time fish to get around Lent restrictions
    >Less than 2% alcohol Ale all day and maybe wine again depending where you are
    >Water is drinkable because of wells etc but like today everybody would rather drink anything else but water
    >Everything salted, dried or in some preservative
    >Everybody is addicted to butter
    >Environment wise its smelly and cold and dark nearly all the time
    Meals you'll be eating soups and stews to make your supplies last longer
    Meat is whatever you can catch most likely from fish to birds to hedgehogs
    Vegetables, bread and cheese
    And if the baker gives you sourdough bread he may hate you
    Your fine plates and cutlery are leaded too

  14. 2 months ago
    this thread is serfcuck propoganda, enjoy eating literal rocks

    >Bread was the most widely consumed food during the Middle Ages (up to one
    kilogram a day) (Laurioux 2002) and could represent up to 70 % of the total diet for the peasants (Marinval 2008). It was surely implicated in the tooth wear of medieval populations, especially peasants. Belmont (2006) explains in his book “La Pierre `a pain” (“The bread stone”) that the stone particles eroded from millstones that were
    not enough compact fell into the flour and became mixed into the bread. Only meticulous sifting could eliminate the splinters of stone but this was possible only for
    “prestigious customers”, such as clerics, the wealthy urban middle class or aristocrats.

    >The rural population had to deal with rudely sieved flour and the large quantities of gravel it contained.

    >Their daily intake of bread full of gravel meant that medieval peasants wore their teeth very rapidly and could easily break them on a bigger chunk of stone

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, that happened. Still happens in other places on the planet of course.
      Not as bad as one may think though. The nerves usually recede, so it's not like your stuck with eternal pain at least.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Source on this is my dad who's a dentist and surgeon. Never worked for Nintendo afaik.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          There's also people that got way more fluoride than normal.
          Wanna hear that story?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Akschually, I don't even care, I will just tell you. Their teeth looked very yellow, but they were very healthy too.
            Apparently that's how it went.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      in addition to the millstones, didn't they also eat more unprocessed or unhulled grains? would this also grind away their teeth?

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just read The Forme of Cury or other Medieval cookbooks
    Keep in mind its for Kings and not the average joe

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Thinking Culinaly reads

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    barley bread, ale, boiled cabbage, and boiled beans
    meat? fruit? spices? salt? for a peasant like you? those are extremely rare items, unless you're literally royalty!

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'll just leave these here:

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    any good recipe books or collections? been interested in making fruit mince pies (but with edible casings) and things of that nature for a while, make for a good dinner party with my nerd mates

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lots of bashing wheat with rocks until it resembles flour.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The male urge to imbibe ale in such an establishment as this and perhaps partake of a brawl.
    Greasy roasted pork eaten with no cutlery for me, thank you.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Heavily spiced and smokey.
    Its like if you combined Christmas time and BBQ season.
    Cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, saffron, sugar, etc., were very common, and everything was cooked over wood or coal fire.
    Sauces tended to lack our modern smoothness.
    The roux hadn't been developed yet, and breadcrumbs or ground nuts were the most common thickeners.
    Vegetables weren't shown much respect.

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    will kill you if you eat it today. i mean, if you got a dish from back then and it time-traveled to your table. it's not about the ingredients, just the quality of food and chemicals back then.

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