Cleaning stainless steel

Hey Culinaly.
I'm new to stainless steel and these spots doesn't come off.
I've read a bit online and they say not to use steel wool for example or the rough side of a sponge, that only water, soap and a brush should be enough.
How do i get these off?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    SOVL

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What's that?

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      came to post this
      imagine not knowing about this and owning stainless anything

      https://i.imgur.com/8bDIIeD.jpeg

      Hey Culinaly.
      I'm new to stainless steel and these spots doesn't come off.
      I've read a bit online and they say not to use steel wool for example or the rough side of a sponge, that only water, soap and a brush should be enough.
      How do i get these off?

      um, so are these new pans?? what have you been cleaning them with????

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        why do you keep putting a israelite onto everything

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This exactly, any abrasive powder soap and a steel wool has it clean in seconds

      Worked as a cook/server/dishwasher for years

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You can't hurt it. It's glazed fats. Use your scrubby side of your sponge, hot water and dawn. If that does not work, you'll need the soapy brillo every now and then. Bartender's friend is l;ike soft soap, very fine gritty soap.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Bartender's friend is l;ike soft soap, very fine gritty soap.
      If I remember right it's actually a mild powdered acid that I can't remember what it's called, as opposed to being a type of soap.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        oxalic acid.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Enough elbow grease will get it off, but you'll regret wasting the time. Call it seasoned or something. It handles food much better with a layer of burnt oil on the surface like that and there's no difference in taste.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bicarbonate of soda

    Vinegar if you need extra oomph

    Always keeps my stainless steel looking like new

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this makes mustard gas

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The mustard from the gas cooks the pan

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is the answer.
      Baking soda alone for burnt oil stains.
      Vinegar for everything else.

      Just make a baking soda slurry with water, soak an hour, scrub the oil stain off with a cloth.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I've read a bit online and they say not to use steel wool
    It's fricking stainless steel, what's going to happen? Scratching the surface doesn't impact anything like that to a noticeable degree. There's no shitty non-stick surface to damage.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      My guess is that anon mistakenly read advice about cast iron, not stainless steel. If you use steel wool on a seasoned cast iron pan you'll strip the seasoning right off, they say.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sounds likely. Stainless takes whatever you throw at it unlike pretty much everything else.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Agreed, which is why I adore my stainless steel cookware so much. I have a couple teflon pans pretty much specifically for eggs, but for everything else I use stainless. Get it all dirty, then every couple weeks spend a few minutes with gloves and Barkeepers Friend and a scrubby sponge and blammo, they're brand-new-looking again. Love it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Throw it away and use a different kind of pan instead. Only use stainless steel for boiling water.
        Or let it be dirty, think of it as "seasoning".

        You can use steel wool on cast iron, it works great, just be gentle. Over time it makes the pan smoother.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >How do i get these off?

    If you can't scrub it off then it's not a problem.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Make a paste out of salt and water and use your fingers. If it's still dirty, try vinegar instead of water.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Get one of them motherfrickers

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Steel wool or abrasive side of kitchen sponge.
    >I've read a bit online and they say not to use steel wool for example or the rough side of a sponge, that only water, soap and a brush should be enough.
    It's not a shitflon nor cast iron with its delicate filth layer. It can be abused.

    If you're too lazy to scrub, get oven cleaner spray or lye, and just use it to remove the caked on grease.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Don't use steel wool. The scratches it makes are superficial, but they're still ugly and unnecessary. Boil vinegar in the pan and scrape that stuff off with a wooden spatula.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Use steel wool or a Scrub Daddy. I'll give you the rough side of a sponge.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Put it on the stove with water and bring it to a boil, put it back on the sink and it'll come right off with the sponge.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i use green scotch brite pads and soapy water. if there's still a residue or film left, i'll use barkeeper's friend. green scotch brite lightly scratches the surface of the pan but i don't give a shit. it's a tool, not a museum piece.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is stainless steel objectively the best type of pan to use?

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    SENSUELL?

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    leave it there. it's good

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    fill it with water, add a small splash of bleach, leave it overnight

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If OPs pic is what is being cleaned off,
    yesterday I used a magic eraser pad and mine was worse, came off pretty easy with it. not sure if it's worth it. 5 minutes with a scouring pad and a bit of elbow grease would have done the just as well

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