Does brining chicken just make it more tender?

Does brining chicken just make it more tender? I'm wanting to bulk make curries where I just make the sauces separately and drop the meat in when I want to serve, so was thinking of brining the chicken to get it juicy separately and then dropping it in when I can.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It won't hurt, but you're more likely to overcook it no matter if it's brined or not.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why's that?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Does brining chicken just make it more tender?
    Absolutely. It works because the salt denatures the muscle fibers and stops them from contracting as much when it cooks. Looser, juicier meat.

    >and drop the meat in when I want to serve
    You can do this and it'll be fine. But I personally think you're missing out on a lot of the flavor infusion that comes from cooking them together.
    Your chicken won't taste like curry and your curry won't taste like chicken. You get Chicken and Curry, not chicken curry.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >But I personally think you're missing out on a lot of the flavor infusion that comes from cooking them together.
      >Your chicken won't taste like curry and your curry won't taste like chicken. You get Chicken and Curry, not chicken curry.
      You're right, but unfortunatey it's a product of circumstance more than anything. I have to bulk cook a lot for a large group of people and it will be hard to get he right quantities of who wants chicken, vs beef, vs vegetarian etc, and doing a bulk sauce and then using meat as required is just going to reduce the waste and prevent running short (because you didn't make enough of one or another).

      brining makes all meat more tender
      If you never tried brined chicken you'll be amazed of the difference.

      I recommend brining it overnight and then slow cooking it in the oven for 3h at 95c

      Noted, thanks. That's a surprisingly slow, low temp cook. I've never heard of anyone doing that before.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The idea is reach 60c internal temp at the thickest part without making moisture escape from outer parts of the chicken.
        Its from blumenthal youtube video, he puts a lemon inside and coats the chicken in butter too.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Nice, sounds ideal for my circumstance where it's bulk cooking and I don't have time requirements.

          I'm guessing this is it?

          He does a lot to make the skin extra crispy. I probably shouldn't bother with that when it comes to curry where you don't really want crispy meat. Come to think of it, I don't ever remember noticing chicken skin in a curry.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The brining is essential if you do this, the salt is necessary to prevent the meat from spoiling since with a cooking temperature that low, the meat winds up spending a long time in the danger zone.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            not really relevant, salmonella for example dies around 50c and it stays above that temp for hours

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              It also stays below that temperature for hours, and the salmonella toxin remains.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Maybe for the first hour.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    brining makes all meat more tender
    If you never tried brined chicken you'll be amazed of the difference.

    I recommend brining it overnight and then slow cooking it in the oven for 3h at 95c

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Does brining beef add anything to the flavour/texture/cooking process?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Well you can brine beef for 10 days to make corned beef

      People seem to be pretty alright with texture of beef tenderloin that just gets surface salting prior to being seared
      Then if you use lesser cuts of beef they usually rec those be used in other ways than steaks

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Well it wouldn't be for steaks, but beef curries

        Do you work in a retirement home or cranial cancer ward where nobody has any teeth left, OP? Who the frick needs to tenderize chicken?

        Something like that

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I don't see the point of overprocessing meat like that if you make a sauce
          you can just throw the raw meat into a pot and boil for couple hours in an oven and it'll break down from heat

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It's just to maximize the flavour and texture through an optimized cooking process. I'm sure it would be fine however you did it, but I want to do it as well as possible.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Corned beef is probably an upgrade over unprocessed cheap cuts of beef for some types of meals but not for curry.
              If talking about chicken that too is brined to make just a cut of filet on a planet rather than mixed in curry sauce. You're better off just buying bunch of chicken thighs, cutting those in slices and throwing them into water raw without extra steps.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Something like that
          In that case, enzymes and acids/bases plus time tenderize chicken and any other protein, not fricking salt. The most time-efficient way to tenderize chicken and any other fricking thing is to liquefy it in your trusty blender

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Ever hear of pastrami?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        is that a type of gabagool?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do you work in a retirement home or cranial cancer ward where nobody has any teeth left, OP? Who the frick needs to tenderize chicken?

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