Fermented foods

Does Culinaly make their own fermented products at home? I want to kimchi to surprise my gf but I don't know were to start. Is any jar good for the process?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Seen quite a few tutorials on tik tok just type in kimchi recipe some go more in depth than others

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Those are gays that have never done anything for themselves except to be on camera.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I go for the pickled punks myself, they're wierd to see if doing urban exploring in nyc for instace. I'm sure that there a lot worse.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Having seen a lot of dead fetuses in my time, I can tell that those are replicas.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Posts like these are why I still come here after 15 years.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Well then how about these?
        I used to go urban exploring in old hospitals and we didn't have cameras but would have to crawl around and find stuff from weird enterences. Looking back on it, it was like what were we doing and only one of use broke a leg from being stupid.
        We saw a lot of weird stuff, including pickled punks. We didn't steal any of them, it was just finding them and seeing them that was interesting if that means anything.
        Respect and everything.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          me and a buddy wandered around an abandoned hospital in a small town
          found all kinds of crap, but we hightailed it outta there when we got to a big room that had 80% collapsed into a basement
          probably the most dangerous place we ever explored
          other than maybe factories on private property or something where you have the risk of getting shot

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I've explored an abandoned hospital complex abandoned when Reagan shut down various health programs in the 80s. The buildings are connected by a shared basement between them, which I guess was a common thing of architecture of it's time since years later, I'd moved into an apartment complex with a shared basement that connected all four buildings (said basement was basically a tiny mall, btw).
            Anyway, the basement was flooded and there were clear signs of the floor being rotted so we didn't stick around long.
            We broke into an abandoned highschool that partially burned down. The class where the fire started had a bunch of kids who died in the fire. We didn't get to that room but there was another where an intact chalkboard was still there and someone must've been there soon before us as there was a chalk drawing of a classroom scene on it. Other people claim to have been in the same room and say that the scene showed the kids in agony as they burned but it's not true at all. The buildings been torn down completely now.
            We used to go into an abandoned gypsum factory that was inexplicably just beyond a HUD housing project that was still in use.
            I know a guy who was murdered by some crust punks in an abandoned warehouse.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A glass jar will be just okay. Remember that gochugaru is not optional.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Remember that gochugaru is not optional.
      yeah I'll have to order that one. Is the taste so much different from other types of chili flakes?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Kimchilet here, it’s a bit distinct from other peppers but I think there’s a couple more common ones that can be subbed (unfortunately I don’t recall which). Main thing to watch out for is that a lot of the gochugaru is from China (including a lot of the ones in korean language).

        Also regarding your container question the IKEA korken line of glass jars are great, inexpensive for the size, kimchi jars.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You're free to do whatever you want in life. This is just my 2 cents:
    Don't try to make something for the first time ever and then give it to somebody else as as surprise

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      there's a thing in cooking that's called "tasting" although it is a pretty advanced technique

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        and you are free to do that. like i said. not really sure what you're trying to get from me here.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You're free to do whatever you want in life. This is just my 2 cents: sometimes unrequested advice given in a patronizing tone might make you sound like a c**t.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >You're free to do whatever you want in life. This is just my 2 cents
            that's the most un-patronizing set of qualifiers that I can think of. If you read that with any kind of tone, you imagined it.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    no im not a ghoul

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I used to work for a pathology lab, and would help dispose of their old specimens. Craziest thing I ever found was an old conjoined twin skeleton from the mid 90's (pic not related)
    I felt like shit letting it go into biohazard waste with the rest of the stuff, but yeah i felt the same. Too much respect for the dead. Maybe I'm superstitious

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I make various kinds of kimchi and sauerkraut a few times annually.
    First few steps for each are the same: salt generously to the point where the cabbage feels gritty in your hands, put into a plastic bag, squeeze as much air out as you can and twist and tuck like you would a bag of American bread that you've lost the twist-tie to. Let it sit a whole until the salt has leeched out a lot of the liquid, about 30 minutes, then drain, reserving the liquid. Rinse and soak the cabbage in fresh water then squeeze dry with kitchen paper.
    From there, the method differs slightly, mostly by what ingredients you add next. For kimchi, I dress the cabbage in homemade-ish kimchi sauce (fish, soy and oyster sauces mixed together), grated ginger and garlic and lots of powdered Korean chilli. If you can't get any, do what Koreans abroad used to do: use a mix of paprika and cayenne.
    Fur sauerkraut, I toss the cabbage with cracked (not ground) peppercorns, whole juniper berries, a few laurels and several whole cloves of garlic.
    Finally, wet your hand with the cast off liquid from saying the cabbage, grab a handful and pack it into a clean jar. Repeat until the jar is full/cabbage runs out. The liquid has just enough salt to drain and preserve without becoming overbearingly salty.
    Use elastic to affix muslin or kitchen paper over the mouth of the jar then set somewhere out of direct sunlight for s few days to a few weeks. The time depends on ambient temperature. It always takes my stuff longer to fermented in winter than in summer.
    After a few days taste some. If it tastes about ready, stash it in the fridge for a week to finish then enjoy. If not, wait another few days, taste test again and fridge it if it's ready then.
    That's it.

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