Has anyone here tried making a perpetual stew? How did it taste weeks/months down the line?

Has anyone here tried making a perpetual stew? How did it taste weeks/months down the line? My brother is considering making one and I thought it sounded very interesting. Imagine the complexity of flavors in a year old perpetual stew...

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    fricking gross

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    In the Indian community in South Africa, this was a thing before the sixties.. You added vegetable curries only and you had to have a coal stove (to keep it constantly warm).

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Was it kept warm by keeping it in the designated street?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yes, all the heat radiating off the mountains of decomposing feces provide a very efficient method of heating. Not to mention the aroma.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Easiest way to do this for a home chef is to cycle a good quality slow cooker on low.

    You also want to designate the base types of protein and flavors you want from the beginning. If it's a fish hunter's stew, keep it to seafood-type beats. If it's beef or lamb, rely on traditional beef and lamb flavors and other red meats. You don't want to throw just random shit into a pot because it'll taste off and you won't want to keep it.

    In addition, you want to eat off it regularly. Even tough cuts break down into nothing with long enough time and heat. Regular servings and replenishment will help mitigate this. The goal, in the end, is to nourish the broth.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also, if you're squeamish about having something heating indefinitely in your house, you can always use a normal pot over the range and refrigerate the stew every night. Skim off the hard fat at the top, heat it back up to boiling, and replenish the stew from there. You can repeat this ad infinitum or as long as your patience runs thin.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The stew will be spending time in the temperature "danger zone" that way though, giving time for bacteria to grow.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          If you minimize the time spent in the danger zone and reboil the risks are marginal. Rancid fat is a bigger issue, which is why you skim.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          the danger zone doesn't matter if you're killing the bacteria every day by boiling it. you can also rapidly cool a large pot off by filling your sink with water and submerging as much of the pot as you can and stirring. When I make bigos I do something like this and keep adding stuff back to it when it gets low.

          just be smart about it. smell it, taste it, never eat any of it before it's been at a rolling boil for 10 minutes to penetrate into dense meat chunks or other objects. keep it salted and keep the acidity level adequate.

          if youre eating it with regularity the old ingredients will be flushed out by new ones. if a single person was eating the stew as their main source of calories for the entire day you should be making like 4 quarts maximum and refreshing the ingredients each day.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >the danger zone doesn't matter if you're killing the bacteria every day by boiling it
            Not entirely true. Some food poisoning is called by ingesting live bacteria while other types are caused by ingesting the toxic byproducts those bacteria pooped out while they were alive. You can't boil away botulinum toxin for example.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              you literally can boil away botulinum toxin. just not the spores

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Wouldn't that be very hard on your fridge? Fridge works most efficiently (as I understand it) when the interior temperature is close to constant around 40°. Little fluctuations are easy to deal with, but putting a big frick-off pot of stew straight into your fridge will throw the thermal situation completely out of whack and possibly cause other foods to get too warm and start spoiling. Note: I have no idea what I'm talking about really.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sort of? My St Paddy's Day corned beef is braised in the same stick I've been using since 2012. On St.PsD, I put a frozen quart of it in the slow cooker, let it melt then add the brisket and enough water to barely cover. After I've cooked the beef, carrots, potatoes and cabbage, I strain the braising liquid and and freeze a quart of it for use next year.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No but I made perpetual mayonnaise before. Once I'm running out of homemade mayo I add more oil and egg into, when it starts tasting thin I add lemon juice and MSG

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >perpetual stew
    this is the stupidest shit ive heard in some time. so what it just never ends or something? kys

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, as you keep eating from it, you add more ingredients to keep it going. Broth low? Toss in more. Meat low? Just add more. Pot need cleaned? Move the stew to a new clean one or to a temporary container to clean it. Its a medieval thing and supposedly has a very unique flavor.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What are these edits supposed to be? is that a israelite in the cauldron?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A bunch of regional Spanish dishes are based on traditional perpetual stews

    https://www.directoalpaladar.com/recetas-de-legumbres-y-verduras/cocido-montanes-receta-complicaciones-clasico-plato-cantabro

    This is a stew from northern Spain based around navy beans (chickpeas are sometimes substituted) stewed with a chopped onion, garlic, carrots, potatoes & collard greens with a ham bone, chorizo (substitute for any good sausage), black pudding & cured pork belly. The proteins (minus ham bone) and soft vegetables would be thrown into the perpetual stew pot maybe an hour before serving, and they'd remove the meat and cut off slices per each person and throw the rest back into the pot.
    Basically you want to make a nice stock base, a durable filler and you must use cured meat because it won't go off at lower temperatures. DO NOT try making a perpetual stew with chicken or minced beef; it'll go bad after a couple days even if you cook it. Use thick cut bacon or whatever cured pork products you have available in your country.

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