How do I cook bacon in stainless

without it sticking, like this, and without it cooking unevenly with the ends totally raw and unsanitary while the middle is burnt to a crisp. Am I supposed to deglaze my pain when cooking bacon?

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You don't want to start with a hot pan or high heat. For it not to stick you need fat, and the fat renders out of the bacon as it cooks. If you're annoyed that the ends aren't cooking as fast as the center you could always cut the pieces in have so they fit better in your pan, and you can always move strips from the center to the edges when you're flipping it. And yes, I deglaze my pain with vodka every day.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The first batch of bacon is always going to cook a bit unevenly, and stick more because there's not enough rendered fat in the pan. You can add more oil to the pan to begin with, or what I do for the first batch of bacon is I add some water to the pan. The water slows down the cooking process, allowing more fat to render before the bacon starts to brown and crisp up. After the first batch there should be enough fat in the pan to get better contact with the pan and even cooking. And yes, you should deglaze your pan. Black coffee is typically used for deglazing the fond from bacon or ham to make red-eye gravy.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >or what I do for the first batch of bacon is I add some water to the pan. The water slows down the cooking process, allowing more fat to render before the bacon starts to brown and crisp up.
      That’s a good way to splatter grease all over your face

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You should be cooking bacon in the oven. Put in in a cold oven set it to 400f and come back in 20 minutes to perfectly cooked bacon. If you MUST use the pan the again, start with a cold pan and add tbps or 2 of water to help the fat render.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There's no benefit to cooking bacon in the oven unless you're doing a large enough amount that it would take you multiple batches on the stove. And nobody should follow your directions without keeping an eye on the bacon. All ovens are a little different, take longer and shorter to heat up, and have hotter or cooler spots (a full sheet of bacon is one of the best ways to see where the hot spots are in your oven).

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        20 minutes is a rough estimate, you obviously check it when it smells done. The benefits are perfectly cooked bacon with zero effort and minimal cleanup. OP clearly doesn't know shit about cooking so the oven is actually the ideal method for him.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >obviously check it when it smells done
          You're not toasting nuts. Bacon smells like bacon as soon as it begins to cook and render its fat. You explicitly said in your first post, "come back in 20 minutes to perfectly cooked bacon." That's my biggest issue. I've probably cooked a few hundred full sheet pans of bacon, and even on a day to day basis using the same oven the cooking time varies. If OP comes back and sees a thirds of his bacon done to burnt, while another third looks barely cooked, it's going to be a much bigger headache for him and more "effort" than had he at the very least checked after maybe 8-10 minutes and rotated the pan. It's also debatable whether a sheet pan is less cleanup than a frying pan; I generally think it's not.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            dont forget grease splattering everywhere on a stovetop. Any splattering in the oven will get burned away next time you use it but the stove and counter tops have to be wiped down

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >grease splattering everywhere on a stovetop
              Turn your heat down. Bacon shouldn't be "splattering everywhere".

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >dont forget grease splattering everywhere on a stovetop
              you don't know how to cook bacon do you?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Nah man the smell definitely intensifies once it's nearing done. And to me it sounds like you're just working with an incredibly shitty oven because in 15 years of cooking bacon this way I've never had the hotspot issue, convection oven or no.

            As far as cleanup, it's dumping the grease and washing the pan vs dumping the grease and throwing out parchment paper, no brainer there. Also enjoy wiping down your entire stovetop after cooking bacon for 2 or more people, or alternatively washing an extra dish if you use a splatter screen.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >in 15 years of cooking bacon this way I've never had the hotspot issue
              Well in 15 years of cooking I've used lots of different ovens; old, new, convection, domestic, industrial. And other than maybe convection, different ovens almost always have slight differences that can makes shit like, "put bacon in 400 degree oven and come back 20 minutes later and it will be perfect" laughable to me. It's like people who say, "cook your burger for 3 minutes per side and it will be a perfect-medium rare." No, it wont. Not unless you happen to get luck or have used YOUR specific home range long enough to have figured out an exact process that works every time for you. It's probably been nearly 15 years since I remember bacon grease splattering everywhere. The difference is that my problem comes from equipment, while yours is a skill issue.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I don't have any problems cooking bacon at all because I'm not retarded, I just like to do it the easiest way. There's no way you're burning bacon in 20 minutes of 400f heat unless you put a single slice in there or something.
                It's probably also been 15 years since you've cooked for anyone but yourself, grease will eventually splatter and there's mild cleanup needed unless you live like a slob. Or you can just put it in the oven and do other things for 20minutes-ish depending on how done you want it, then throw away the parchment and clean nothing.
                There's no figuring out your own oven retard just fucking watch it the first time and see how long it takes to reach your desired doneness and you have your "exact process". You sound like a total moron.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >in 15 years of cooking bacon this way I've never had the hotspot issue
              Well in 15 years of cooking I've used lots of different ovens; old, new, convection, domestic, industrial. And other than maybe convection, different ovens almost always have slight differences that can makes shit like, "put bacon in 400 degree oven and come back 20 minutes later and it will be perfect" laughable to me. It's like people who say, "cook your burger for 3 minutes per side and it will be a perfect-medium rare." No, it wont. Not unless you happen to get luck or have used YOUR specific home range long enough to have figured out an exact process that works every time for you. It's probably been nearly 15 years since I remember bacon grease splattering everywhere. The difference is that my problem comes from equipment, while yours is a skill issue.

              Forgot to add: you actually use a sheet of parchment every time you cook bacon? And then you don't wash the pan despite the parchment only covering the bottom? That's kind of nasty. And the idea that you can tell by the smell when bacon is almost done is just dumb. Like, I can light a sick of incense and the room will smell within a minute or two, but in 20 minutes the smell will be more intense because it's been going for longer. That doesn't tell me the incense are about to burn out.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The parchment covers the entire pan retard. And yes the you can smell when bacon is cooked, just like you can smell when it's burning. Crispy bacon smells different than floppy bacon and you probably have something wrong with your nose if you can't tell the difference.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      never do this, this is the worst way to cook bacon.

      it only take 11 minutes to cook bacon on a stove top.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Best way to cook bacon is to slice it up and then cook it all at once into bacon bits. That way the pan is swimming in lard and nothing sticks, and you have a bunch of lard at the end you can save to cook with later.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    heat pan, cover with a little bit of oil, wipe excess if you need to
    alternatively deglaze with a little bit of water periodically

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Uhhh keep it moving and make sure there's fat between the bacon and pan at all times?

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    cut pieces before cooking, put a little butter in the pan and heat it up before adding bacon, don't have to heat too high.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    microwave your bacon between two sheets of paper towel

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Imagine the huge smelly farts and shits she takes with a DUMPTRUCK like that god DAMN

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This actually works in a pinch I was surprised to learn.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    when i worked at wendy's , they cooked bacon in the oven which i thought was weird.
    but all the bacon came out evenly cooked. it will take longer, and is only efficient with a big batch of bacon; but it is another option

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >the ends totally raw and unsanitary
    the ends are not raw they are cooked just fine you dimwitted nard.

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