How do I get a job as a prep cook or sous chef without any restaurant experience?

How do I get a job as a prep cook or sous chef without any restaurant experience? I have solid knife skills and am a good liar. IT job laid me off

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You need to smoke American spirit non filter. The long burn time will extend your smoke breaks.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >go for smoke break in order to relax from the kitchen
      >smoking makes me feel sick in my throat and lungs
      >come back to work feeling worse than when i went outside

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        smokegays (in this thread) got quiet after this post dropped. .

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    be mexican
    work for minimum wage + sendbacks

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >as a prep cook or sous chef
    Those are the lowest and highest positions in a kitchen, respectively.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don’t think you’ll get sous chef without any kitchen experience at all. That’s kinda like applying to be president of google when the only experience you have is owning a gmail account.

      where I worked, a lot of people started as dish washer with zero experience in anything. Occasionally a line cook or someone will ask the dishwasher to help prepping stuff and then as they learn more and more they eventually learn to do most of what a line cook would do and get promoted.

      >highest position
      Isn’t sous chef 2nd to the actual chef? Kinda like president is to chef as vice president is to sous chef?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Isn’t sous chef 2nd to the actual chef?
        Yeah, but I'm assuming the chef is going to be the one doing the hiring, making sous the highest position available. The top floor of a building is called the penthouse, after all.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Sous means under.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why would you even want one of the worst paid jobs with shittiest work hours? You'd honestly be better of joining the army or take some other shitty job if you're that desperate for a career change.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm in the same situation but I only wanna work in restaurants with michelin stars or james beard awards, I don't wanna slave my life away at denny's

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Come to Asheville NC we have some of those and always need more food and beverage workers. and you'll be trapped by the inflated cost of living relative to income. Win win!

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      it's all the same slaving everywhere but you make more cash at soulless corpo kitchens and they might even give you benefits too. my friend cooked at a michelin place for a while and he said most people at mconald's made more than he did

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Was considering getting a prep cook job for the weekends while at uni, looks pretty easy. Any anons who can offer their experience?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I worked in the cafeteria all through college. The pay was shit but I more than made up for it with the amount of shit I swiped from the walk-in. If your a poor student free food that isn’t fricking ramen is a huge perk. It was also a good fallback job because my industry was on its ass when I graduated so I kitchen hopped for a few years.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Cool, think I'll go for one at this Italian place then. Food's gone way up here as is (somehow the restaursnts are still busy though) and I could get used to morning sketti.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Prep cook is basically one step above dishwasher so knife skills are probably enough.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You want to become a sous chef with no experience?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If for some reason nobody will hire you as a prep cook straight off, hire on as KP in a big place and then just take over the job of the first prep cook who quits, dies, gets fired or goes to prison, you won't wait long.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can start in the dishpit at worst or maybe find prep cook but avoid places desperate for it.
    >good liar
    lol ,this is not like IT

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >lol ,this is not like IT
      This. You can't bullshit your way through a kitchen job, because you're going to be around more experienced people all day who are both watching you work and seeing the direct results of your work. It's immediately obvious when someone lies about their experience as soon as they get in the kitchen.

      And don't say you have solid knife skills. Only people who don't have solid knife skills would say that. I don't care how much you cook at home. You're going to be spending 8 hours a day chopping vegetables, 5 days a week. You're going to dice more onions in a month than you have in your entire life. No amount of home cooking can compare to that.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I got my first kitchen job with "I can cry my way through a 5lb bag of onions in 3 minutes. 5 if you want a fine dice. If I can take a 5 minute smoke break to clear my eyes afterward, I'm confident I could consistently prep 150lbs of mirepoix before the rush, daily if necessary.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          If actually say something that specific and are able to follow through on it, sure. But if you just say "great knife skills" on your resume and list zero kitchen experience, the person reading it is going to think "this person has no idea what good knife skills are."

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Just gotta show up with a portrait of the chef, carved into a root vegetable

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Dont fricking do it. I spent 10 years trying to get out.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It will be obvious to everyone within minutes that you don't have any kitchen experience. Just be honest and work your way up. If you can work for a few weeks without quitting or ODing on the clock you'll make prep cook.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Different anon, but to add to this, a lot of chefs actually prefer kids coming in with no experience but who have a good attitude and energy, because it means they haven't developed a ton of bad habits or have an ego (they HATE wienery culinary school graduates who think they know everything). It means they can teach you the right way to do things (or at least how they want things done), and all you have to do is pay attention, be able to do the things you're shown, ask questions (but only when necessary), and demonstrate improvement. Nobody expects you to be a superstar. Just remember people don't like repeating things more than once or maybe twice in a kitchen, so if you're shown how to do something, make god damn sure you are clear on it before starting to prep 200 portions worth. Even if you're not on the line, study the menu and watch what the cooks do and how they do it. It will give you a better understanding of what you're doing, and when a line position opens up, you'll be right there.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This goes for any job. If you don't have the experience but show that you are willing to learn you can climb really fast. The hardest thing we have in the industry right now is having people that show up on time and actually give a frick about their job so attention to detail and meeting time hacks is key. If you can do that you'll be better than 95% of the other people working there.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Also make sure to ask for tips from the senior workers from time to time. If you're falling behind on something at least communicate it instead of trying to hide it. And inflating the ego of your coworkers by letting them talk about themselves and how they do things will make them like you more.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          this. i drop almost anything i'm doing to show somebody the right way, and then the cheat/easy way for when my boss is around but it saves time and the customers can't possibly care.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            isn't*

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I applied as prep cook at a retirement home
    I have literally 0 social skills and am a unfriendly person although I'm fine working in teams and so this seemed like the only job I could get

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've been trying to get a job as a janitor or dishwasher for 3 months. Applied to at least 100 jobs. And I have 2 years of restaurant experience. I might get food prep at a fast food chain. Chick-Fil-A wouldn't even call me back. I'd have an easier time just pretending to be moronic to get a job at Good Will.

      consider getting into the trades.
      being an anti-social butthole is half the job, although you won't get to throw your weight around much as a new hire.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        In my country cooking is a trade
        You need to go through an apprenticeship

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          the process is similar but i would still consider it service industry.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            In my country a trade is just something you become qualified for through apprenticeships
            Hairdressers are considered a trade

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              hairdressers are also service industry.

              How do I become a line chef?
              If I don't want to go to culinary school because I already have debts from college, is it possible to become a line chef or will I be stuck as a line cook or a dishwasher?

              chef is a job position, he manages the kitchen. if you don't have a head for business and logistics then you won't be chef.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chef_de_partie

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >hairdressers are also service industry.
                I find it kinda funny how people in countries without industry call all sort of thing industry.

                In my country a trade is just something you become qualified for through apprenticeships
                Hairdressers are considered a trade

                >In my country a trade is just something you become qualified for through apprenticeships
                Ad-hoc apprenticeship or something formalized?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Formalised
                You have two options to become a qualified chef
                The first is going to school
                The second is going to school once a week whilst you work in a kitchen professionally as an apprentice, getting paid apprentice wages

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Formalised
                Not as bad as school alone, I personally prefer something Ad-hoc

                Around here you simply start working in a restaurant, then you make a bit of a name for yourself and get hired by better restaurants.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                What worries me is if I'm a year or so into my apprenticeship and then I realise that I can't handle it
                I've just worked 1 year getting paid shit below minimum wage wages and have nothing to show for it
                I'm not sure why my country doesn't just do what the USA does, what benefit does making the position of chef a qualified one bring?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous
              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Bu... but... in the US we call literally anything an industry
                As i was saying, countries with any real industry will call hair-cutting and banking a "industry", this is called a cope.

                What worries me is if I'm a year or so into my apprenticeship and then I realise that I can't handle it
                I've just worked 1 year getting paid shit below minimum wage wages and have nothing to show for it
                I'm not sure why my country doesn't just do what the USA does, what benefit does making the position of chef a qualified one bring?

                >What worries me is if I'm a year or so into my apprenticeship and then I realize that I can't handle it
                This is far better than expending a lot of time in school, then starting to work and realizing you hate it, as it usually happens. It's not good, but it's better than the alternative, for sure.

                >I'm not sure why my country doesn't just do what the USA does, what benefit does making the position of chef a qualified one bring?
                Making sure fewer people are qualified so wages are higher. If anyone could get a doctor degree in a year, it'd be a minimal wage job.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >As i was saying, countries with any real industry will call hair-cutting and banking a "industry", this is called a cope.
                I meant to say without, I'm sorry.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >usa
                >no industry
                sounds like cope to me

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I was a construction worker for 10 years, I'm hoping restaurants will be easier. I'm also moronic.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/kRNAdu7.jpg

      Get a servsafe certification
      You most likely will get a line cook job plus the added benefit of taking temperatures and labeling dates on food without the extra pay for the work

      btw having a Servsafe certification/other food safety cert will help you IMMENSELY in getting a retirement home chef/caterer job. They care a lot about that kinda thing and usually require it.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/kRNAdu7.jpg

        Get a servsafe certification
        You most likely will get a line cook job plus the added benefit of taking temperatures and labeling dates on food without the extra pay for the work

        What's it like getting it in the US?
        I've done some research and it seems very complicated
        I think they have inspectors who will observe you working and you need to already be working in a professional kitchen to apply for the certificate

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It's easy, you can get the basic Food Handler certification online. $20 at their website (ServSafe)

          I'd heavily recommend getting the Managerial license though. For that, you have to go in person for a class and take a test. But it's only one day you need to do it, so it should be easy. That one costs about $120. I got the certificate before I got a job, you don't need to be already employed.
          It was easy and I did them both. You can go on their website to find a class that will teach it locally, mine was like an hour drive away. Managerial is good for restaurant/catering/retirement home jobs. With that you can be the head food safety expert for a restaurant, most states require at least one guy to be certified.
          Food Handler is good to work the deli/sandwich counter at a supermarket.
          You can even get the alcohol server one if you want to be able to be a bartender.

          I've only had a food safety inspector come like once in a new moon, even more if you are doing renovations/new. A place I worked had a guy come in all the time for covid but they never watched me work. You show them the journal of temperatures, the cleaning supplies you use, and the work environment. Usually the manager will let you know beforehand and deal with the inspector themselves.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you don’t wanna move up in the kitchen
    dishwashing is kino and brainless, line cooks are stressed out and need 20 cigs to cope

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I applied to be a dishwasher at Olive Garden and you have to go through 3 fricking interviews. Plus they all want you to be a bus boy too, I don't want to see people from high school, I want to hide in the back.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've been trying to get a job as a janitor or dishwasher for 3 months. Applied to at least 100 jobs. And I have 2 years of restaurant experience. I might get food prep at a fast food chain. Chick-Fil-A wouldn't even call me back. I'd have an easier time just pretending to be moronic to get a job at Good Will.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Chick fil a actually have ridiculously high standards for the people they hire so they wouldn't be a good starter job.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I have an interview for line cook at Chili's this week which I assume would be harder.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Catering is great, I highly recommend it

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just walk right in look the manager in the eye and shake their hand.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    How do I become a line chef?
    If I don't want to go to culinary school because I already have debts from college, is it possible to become a line chef or will I be stuck as a line cook or a dishwasher?

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have just discovered that the brigade system fell out of fashion 2-3 decades ago in 90% of restaurants
    What are the implications of this for non-diner/chain restaurants?

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get a servsafe certification
    You most likely will get a line cook job plus the added benefit of taking temperatures and labeling dates on food without the extra pay for the work

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >the added benefit of taking temperatures and labeling dates on food without the extra pay for the work
      I don't know what this means. People like you having a certification, but there's no law that requires you to have one to do those things. I got one once and left it on my resume for years after it expired, and if I ever got asked I'd just pull out my expired card and be like, "oh shit, I guess this thing expired awhile back; nobody ever asks about it, but I still remember everything. You don't actually need me to go take an online test again, right?" Also, is that from an actual frame of Kemono Friends? The artwork looks like shit.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do you think cooking schools would be improved if you were required to do a work placement of like 6 months at the start of the program?
    Or is that just totally unrealistic?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I think any school can be improved by mixing real work experience with classes. But it brings the issue of students learning bad habits, and people in general prefer to only study.

      One model is to have the school keep a "model workshop".

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You need experience to be a line cook? They drafted me from the dishes when I was like 19. It was like coming out of the darkest frontline trenches for a taste of command behind the lines. The battles were more intense but i never forgot my Chinese and Portuguese brothers left behind in THE PIT.

    Ciivies like OP will never understand

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Unfortunately, the custom of just promoting competent people within is dying. In most career paths today, this has become the worse path possible.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      reading this in shepherd from modern warfare 2's voice was fun

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    This is surprising a good thread, kinda like /k/'s MEG. I was kinda expecting someone to spout "civillian" though.

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