How do i use this shit?

How do i use this shit?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Correctly.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    3 parts oil to 1 part balsamic. and you have a balsamic vinaigrette. thats it. thats the only use for it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You can use it for bruschetta or other tomato dishes. Cuts the acidity a little.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >adding acidic vinegar to acidic tomato dishes to cut the acid
        Huh

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Good balsamic vinegar is naturally sweet

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Boil it too a reduction and put it on desserts/strawberry

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Also is the "real" shit worth it?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      ball-sac-mic

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      1000x YES, only get the "real" shit, it tastes so much better. Make sure it has the actual stamp on it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, even A. Grandi, our domestic Hobsbawm, had to agree that this one of the few real ancient culinary traditions and that the industrial product is a pale imitation.
      >the IGP version, the least noble, is one of the five most exported delicacies together with Parmigiano Reggiano, Grana Padano, Prosecco and Parma Ham. It's a shame that the original (traditional) costs 10,000 euros per liter and requires at least 12 years of aging, which can reach 30. The business risk is enormous: in the end a jury decides who to grant the sticker to. The substitute is made with must, wine vinegar and caramel. A shrewd business operation."

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The fundamental issue with traditional-method balsamic-style condiment is the enormous opportunity cost, which makes producing it as a basic commodity uneconomical. You have to age grape must in a series of ever-smaller barrels for a minimum of 12 years, so the upfront time and equipment investment is huge. If you sell it as 'regular' balsamic condiment, you're not going to recoup that cost.
        You either have to a) shoot for the Designated Appelation of Origin (which only works if you're in Modena or Emilia-Romagna, and, even then, it's not guaranteed), or b) offer it as a limited release (to keep financial impact low) loss-leader product, to enhance your (winemaking) company's visibility (which is what some winemakers do in other Italian regions, or even countries).

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Very carefully.

  5. 1 month ago
    multigrain

    I don't know

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    dijon mustard
    balsamico
    honey
    olive oil
    salt
    pepper

    put everything in a jar and shake to get excellent salad dressing

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Bake bread. Pour some olive oil in a bowl.
    D R I Z Z L E
    R
    i
    Z
    Z
    L
    E
    balsamic vinegar on oil.
    Dip bread.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Avoid it entirely. You're buying fake syrup that's stepped on by Italian organized crime.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Taste bretty good to me

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You're overpaying for Worcestershire sauce and you've never had the real thing

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Cool

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Apparently the "real" stuff is pretty expensive. Those are 100ml bottles.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I toss it in all of my stews, braised meats, chili, soups. etc.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Surprised no one mentioned this but I like making a reduction with it and using it as a sauce. You can mix it with honey as well or white wine, check out some recipes. The glaze goes great over chicken or salmon for example

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    lettuce, tomato, onion, add a frickton of this vinegar, a bit of olive oil and salt
    das le it
    or specific recipe of sardines

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I like balsamic reduction on brussels sprouts.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Drizzled on top of fruit

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Only if it’s the good thick aged stuff. I can’t imagine pouring dollar store quality balsamic on fruits

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        you know you need to reduce it right

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    have a bottle always standing around in a visible place, to feel sophisticated. preferably next to Worcestershire sauce.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pro tipp:

    if youre frying onions put a bit into the pan
    caramelizes the onions give them a sweet taste
    real good shit for stuff with meat or even burgers

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      can confirm,it's called "caramelizing" the stuff
      apparently this is quiet literal and common
      for example let's think about lamb ribs, sliced
      you throw them on the fire and slightly (emphasis on slightly) burn the outside
      that'll taste like heaven
      and someone correct me if I'm wrong, that's quiet literally a checmical proccess through which you indeed convert the food to sugar
      >t. official /b/ro-science comitee

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        caramelization and browning are two different process. caramelization makes sugars change into liquids and brown, browning meat or bread is millard reaction thats proteins and sugars reacting. burning is turning all that shit into carbon

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/H79bS4p.png

      How do i use this shit?

      can confirm,it's called "caramelizing" the stuff
      apparently this is quiet literal and common
      for example let's think about lamb ribs, sliced
      you throw them on the fire and slightly (emphasis on slightly) burn the outside
      that'll taste like heaven
      and someone correct me if I'm wrong, that's quiet literally a checmical proccess through which you indeed convert the food to sugar
      >t. official /b/ro-science comitee

      caramelization happens at low temps and gets faster when acidic. If you ever make french onion soup or caramelize onions by themselves it takes a while. balsamic adds fruit sugar fructose that caramelizes a low temp fast and acid speeding the process up and adding nice wine flavor

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    put it on the meat before you cook it

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I use it on mozarella

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