how tf you all keep your iron pans seasoned?

how tf you all keep your iron pans seasoned?
I loved cooking with cast iron because they're cheap and can "heal" if they get chipped or scratched. But the thing is I no matter how much I try seasoning it, it seems to keep being stripped off some how. The only thing I cook in it is eggs and vegetables, and heat up some ham once in a while. I never cook anything acidic in it (exclusively use my stainless for that)

I'm going nuclear rn and going to put a layer of canola and bake the fricker at 500F for an hour 30+ times. If that doesn't do it then I give up and ditching iron and going exclusively with stainless

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >cooking on a surface of polymerized canola oil
    Honestly sounds worse than teflon, you probably already have bowel cancer.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what oil you suggest anon? I haven't started yet. And sorry, I meant sunflower oil. I forgot I switched to sunflower oil

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        NTA, but I season all my cast iron with pure (unhydrogenated) lard and it works better than any seed oil I ever tried.
        Also, be sure to sand the cooking surface smooth beforehand for maximum performance, like so: https://youtu.be/ljSQrSoSYAE
        A polished smooth cast iron pan seasoned with lard is the best cooking surface.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I agree with you about the lard, but the smoothness is almost completely immaterial to cooking. Smooth surfaces do look prettier though, so if that's a priority for you then sure go for it.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I thought the same originally, but I have a pan that I polished and a pan that I never polished and the difference is night and day on how much things stick to the unpolished pan regardless of how seasoned the surface is.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I didn't sand mine and it works fantastic.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i didn't bother clicking til i saw it was kent

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >be sure to sand the cooking surface smooth beforehand for maximum performance
          Ah so that's how this guy got his pan so non-stick /sarc
          Stop parroting this moronic line about smoothness having anything whatsofrickingever to do with cast iron performance. It doesn't matter. It's simply cope for having overpaid for vintage or boutique pans.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Ah so that's how this guy got his pan so non-stick /sarc
            That pan is very smooth. It's unevenly pitted, sure, but it's still smooth. Have you ever felt the inside of a Lodge pan? It's rough like sandpaper and it absolutely snags on food and encourages sticking.
            >Stop parroting this moronic line about smoothness having anything whatsofrickingever to do with cast iron performance.
            I'm not "parroting" anything but my personal experience. I'm telling people what helped me.
            >It's simply cope for having overpaid for vintage or boutique pans.
            Ah, yes, my $30 "boutique" Lodge pan from Kroger that I spent like $10 sanding down. Such a high expense from which I will never recover, surely I must cope for having wasted 1.5 hours worth of wages on this luxury.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              For reference, pic related is the kind of surface I'm talking about. It's not just uneven, it's ROUGH. These are the most common cast iron pans out there and sanding down that rough surface absolutely helps prevent sticking.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Oh you mean like this one?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >muh fried egg
                Now how about some meat or an omelet? I have a sanded down lodge pan and a stock one. I can brown and smash up ground beef in the sanded pan without a single hint of sticking, it all just wipes away effortlessly without water, but the stock one gets covered in fond that I have to scrub off after in the sink. Same with bacon. Omelets (I cook them diner style) have a stronger tendency to stick to the rougher pan as they brown, too, while the smooth pan releases them much more easily.
                It's not like Lodge pans are unusable in their stock state, it's just WAY better after being sanded down.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >how about an omelet
                Wanna know how we know you didn't actually watch the video?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You're right, I assumed it was one of the other webms I've seen. Doesn't change my point. I'm not saying it's unusable without sanding, I'm saying that sanding gives maximum performance and maximum ease of use.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >sanding gives maximum performance
                It doesn't though. It has no effect whatsoever. It simply makes the pan look nicer.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >It has no effect whatsoever.
                My personal experience in comparing the two pans I own says you're wrong and I trust my own senses more than I trust you.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >didn't even watch the video
                >expects his opinion to still matter

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >thinks showing that you can keep food from sticking to an unmodified Lodge pan proves that it can't be easier and more foolproof on a sanded one
                It's like if someone said putting a scope on a rifle helps with accuracy at distance and the response was, "Nuh-uh! Here's a video of someone shooting accurately at distance without a scope!" Sure, okay, but how does that prove the scope wouldn't make it easier?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You're right, I assumed it was one of the other webms I've seen. Doesn't change my point. I'm not saying it's unusable without sanding, I'm saying that sanding gives maximum performance and maximum ease of use.

                Fricking moron writes an essay on why cast iron sucks without even bothering to watch a video less than a minute and a half. And we wonder why this place is such a shithole these days. Please just have a nice day, but if you can't do that at least don't ever try and think your opinion an anything is worth more than a pile of shit and keep it to yourself

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If your takeaway from my posts is that cast iron sucks you're a moronic, illiterate ESL. Cast iron is literally all I use and I've even said in this very thread that I prefer it over stainless pans. I also prefer cast iron over ceramic (expensive and fragile) and teflon (toxic bullshit). The fact that I happen to also feel that sanding cast iron down to a smooth, polished finish and re-seasoning it with lard makes it work even better than normal doesn't mean that I think cast iron doesn't work normally or that it's bad in any way. It's your own personal problem that you interpret my offering tips to improve cast iron performance means I hate cast iron. Go frick off and take your moronic strawmen with you.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                tl;dr no one cares what you think

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I love cast iron and you're a fricking moron. Short enough for your illiterate moron brain?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                tldr

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Cast iron best. Learn to read.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Well if you are going to 500F you better use something with a really high smoke point like rapeseed oil.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >How do you take care of something
      Good habits.

      >Polymerized canola
      I don't know anyone who does this with cast iron but than again I only hang out with white people. I've never actually ever bought Canola or peanut oil.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      TSD (Total Schizo Death) can't come soon enough

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Seasoning builds up very thickly when cooking vegetables and even eggs, but most meat seems to be bad for seasoning, if only because it gets stuck to the pan while cooking, and the effort required to clean this shit off will always scratch off a layer of seasoning. There's a guy on youtube who deglazes all his carbon steel pans with hot water, which seems to get all the stuck-on bits of meat off the pan without hurting the seasoning. I'm going to try this method from scratch on a new carbon steel pan I have in the mail. I've never had very much luck building seasoning up naturally on cast iron.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Just put some water in the pan and put it back on the fire on low for a few minutes, whatever is stuck will soften to the point it can be easily scraped out. I've seen youtube videos where a guy puts the pan on the fire and gets it very hot then puts hot water from the tap into it to "steam" off the stuck bits. While that works, more or less, it's a hard thermal shock on the pan and no faster than just putting a half cup of water in the pan and heating it up, you don't even have to bring it to a boil, 150F or so is all you need.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Seasoning builds up very thickly when cooking vegetables and even eggs
      doesn't seem to for me. I use butter for eggs and sunflower for everything else. Is it possible that the cause of my seasoning stripping off is because 90% of the cooking is with a high smoke point oil so it never polymerizes during cooking?

      >meat seems to be bad for seasoning, if only because it gets stuck to the pan while cooking, and the effort required to clean this shit off will always scratch off a layer of seasoning
      Maybe my seasoning isn't as bad as I thought. I just use hot water with a nylon brush or paper towel and it's clean in 1-2 minutes. It's not usually much more difficult than my stainless unless eggs stick to it. it still looks like there's no seasoning when I dry it though (It doesn't have that patine finish)

      >going to try this method from scratch on a new carbon steel pan
      let us know plz how it goes if this thread is still is still alive

      Just put some water in the pan and put it back on the fire on low for a few minutes, whatever is stuck will soften to the point it can be easily scraped out. I've seen youtube videos where a guy puts the pan on the fire and gets it very hot then puts hot water from the tap into it to "steam" off the stuck bits. While that works, more or less, it's a hard thermal shock on the pan and no faster than just putting a half cup of water in the pan and heating it up, you don't even have to bring it to a boil, 150F or so is all you need.

      won't that burn off the seasoning? one time I got frustrated (don't remember why) and tossed my pan on a propane stovetop max temp outside for like 6 hours. When I came back to check it, it was glowing slightly with ash of some kind in it and when it cooled, it looked like it was bare iron.

      Seasoning is a meme, just cook with it and use more oil if your shit's sticking.

      try cooking scrambled eggs in an unseasoned iron pan. Now throw it in the trash and buy a new pan cuz you'll be scrubbing for hours otherwise, no matter how much oil. Whereas with a seasoned pan I could probly get away with using a teaspoon of butter or oil for 2 eggs

      I was watching an old Julia Child Show episode the other day, and she described the process of seasoning thusly:
      >put oil in the bottom of the pan and let it sit overnight
      >the next day, put salt in the pan and rub it vigorously
      >then, proceed to cook with it as normal
      wtf, and I bet all her cast iron and carbon steel pans were perfectly well seasoned regardless of having no clue where seasoning comes from.

      >regardless of having no clue where seasoning comes from
      she probly has someone who knows what they're doing fix them up while off camera

      Idk but my Mom bought some seasoning oil from one of the ci companies and that stuffs a miracle. I used some on a rusty pan I had when visiting and it fixed it up and has stayed good for years.

      ci companies?
      Could you get the name or pic of the oil plz? I'm edging the idea of trying motor oil at this point.

      NTA, but I season all my cast iron with pure (unhydrogenated) lard and it works better than any seed oil I ever tried.
      Also, be sure to sand the cooking surface smooth beforehand for maximum performance, like so: https://youtu.be/ljSQrSoSYAE
      A polished smooth cast iron pan seasoned with lard is the best cooking surface.

      I think lard is the only thing I haven't tried at this point. Ty anon Ima try it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        builds up very thickly when cooking vegetables and even eggs
        >doesn't seem to for me. I use butter for eggs and sunflower for everything else. Is it possible that the cause of my seasoning stripping off is because 90% of the cooking is with a high smoke point oil so it never polymerizes during cooking?
        The point while sauteing vegetables when seasoning builds up the most is when the cooking oil is getting a little broken down toward the end of cooking, and there are many spots on the pan not covered in hardly any oil. If you do multiple batches in the same pan with some of the same oil, you'll see it build up more.

        If you look at a pan you just fried food in, where does the seasoning build up? The side walls. That's because oil is constantly being splattered up on the sides in very thin layers and heated up without a bunch of liquid oil covering it up. This photo of a stainless pan that got unintentionally "seasoned" illustrates the concept. It's generally easier to season the side walls than the bottom.

        That's because you weren't around when that article came out.

        >That's because you weren't around when that article came out.
        Cry harder, homosexual. The ONLY reason you keep reposting this article is because you want to act like a smug butthole about how this one random old lady's idea to use flaxseed oil didn't work out. Frick off.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >if only because it gets stuck to the pan while cooking,
      Have I already superseasoned my pan then? Nothing ever sticks to it any more. +1 new ip btw

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It takes very little to season a pan. If it's not actually gunmetal-gray - if it has the slightest tinge of brown - then it's as seasoned as it needs to be. That glossy deep black level of seasoning is pretty, but unnecessary.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >If it's not actually gunmetal-gray - if it has the slightest tinge of brown - then it's as seasoned as it needs to be
          Yup, I seasoned this 19th century skillet once after stripping it, and it turned this brown color. Not had a single problem with rust and it's mostly non-stick. Never felt a need to keep seasoning it till it was black.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Well if course if you're scrubbing regularly it'll come off, deglaze, or simply boil water in it after cooking.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Seasoning is a meme, just cook with it and use more oil if your shit's sticking.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >just use more oil
      The first time that thought sprung into your little head should have been a clue that it's not a meme.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >how tf you all keep your iron pans seasoned?
        I just don't give a frick about the pan and it somehow works.
        I think I've seasoned one on purpose only 1 or 2 times when it was new and I did sand it a bit so it is a bit smoother.
        >But the thing is I no matter how much I try seasoning it, it seems to keep being stripped off some how.
        You're probably doing something wrong.
        >I'm going nuclear rn and going to put a layer of canola and bake the fricker at 500F for an hour 30+ times.
        500F is too much, its like 260C. All you need is to go slightly above the smoke point of whatever oil you're using. In case of canola that's 230C.
        And you don't really need to use an oven for seasoning, unless you are dealing with absolutely naked cast iron pan. I suggest doing it on the stovetop. Like chinks are seasoning their woks.
        Clean off all rust and loose junk with sandpaper, coat it with thin layer of oil and heat it up on the stovetop until it starts smoking. Turn off the heat, wait for it to cool down, rinse off excess oil with dishwashing soap and its done.
        It is thin seasoning, but with seasoning, you have to earn this filth by using the thing. If you have any exposed metal, it should be barely brown. And not sticky to hand touch.

        Caring about seasoning is a meme. You do it once and then just dont give a frick.

        The real question is why do you even have cast iron? They make good non-stick pans out of thick aluminium which have same thermal capacity....

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >You do it once and then just dont give a frick.
          Ideally, yes. Judging by the frequent posts about seasoning issues, apparently this doesn't work for everybody.
          >why do you even have cast iron
          Because I'm an oldgay who's been using it for over 50 years, and it just works. I've never had issues with seasoning, but I'm not so blind as to fail to notice that some people do have issues.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Ideally, yes. Judging by the frequent posts about seasoning issues, apparently this doesn't work for everybody.
            I think this is because people just think too much about their seasoning, all those satanic cults of oiling, baking, special oils... Probably makes it thicker than it should be and thus more likely to break off.

            >The real question is why do you even have cast iron?
            Because nonstick pans are full of toxic chemicals.

            Why not stainless?

            So are cast iron pans. You think polymerized oil is good for you?

            I wonder are there any studies on this subject? It is known that oil fumes are cancer...

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Why not stainless?
              Too expensive, especially for how fiddly it is. Cast iron retains its seasoning better and that makes it less annoying to use, in my opinion.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >The real question is why do you even have cast iron?
          Because nonstick pans are full of toxic chemicals.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            So are cast iron pans. You think polymerized oil is good for you?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I think it's not remotely as bad as any plastic or plastic-derived chemical coating.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Plastic is literally polymerized oil.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >polymerized petroleum is the same thing as polymerized vegetable oil because they both have the word "oil" in them
                Based moron. Now go pour motor oil on your salad and let me know how it tastes.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Based moron. Now go pour motor oil on your salad and let me know how it tastes.
                You self-owned yourself hard here. Rapeseed oil (today we know it as canola) was originally used as machine oil. It was only marketed for human consumption because petroleum was usurping Big Rape's market, and they had to find new customers fast. All of the processing of rapeseed into oil is highly industrialized, involves toxic chemicals (hexane), and really has nothing to do with the food industry except for some clever marketing of the product as "vegetable" oil, as if rapeseed is the same thing as a cucumber or a carrot. You would never put the shit into your body if you knew where it came from.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Okay, so go put motor oil on your salad and let me know how it tastes.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                refined mineral oil is literally a laxative, it doesn't have a taste nor does it get absorbed in the intestines

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                i mean why do you think the cutting board homosexuals shill it for their niche autism

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Then go put motor oil on your salad and let me know how it tastes.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                probably a slight sulfur note
                also what question is that even? linsneed oil tastes gross too

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The point is that two things sharing a name doesn't make them the same thing. You may as well say olive oil and avocado oil are the same as petroleum-based oils, too. Incidentally, you can season a cast iron pan with avocado oil or all kinds of animal fats. I don't accept the "plastic is just polymerized oil" argument because there's more than one type of oil that exists, and anyone who thinks all things called "oil" are interchangeable in terms of edibility, toxicity, and overall health impact should see how substituting olive oil for motor oil goes.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                the point is that everything hydrocarbon works for your homosexual "seasoning". some people use beeswax, which isnt even an oil, you could even use a fricking paraffin candle
                >"plastic is just polymerized oil"
                was another anon and hes moronic, there is a lot more to plastics

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >'beeswax'
                >with (canola)
                >and safflower oil

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                beeswax is stupid expensive compared to other waxes, obviously they cut it as much as possible.
                i blacken iron parts often with pure beeswax on a rag, leaves a nice brown tone instead of pure black from throwing a glowing piece into an oil jar

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                This is what I use to lube up my wife before sex. It's baby oil without the scent

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >It's baby oil without the scent
                its also the most common industrial lubricant, used as cutting fluid, leather and skin care products, medication against lice and other topical parasites and the only reason we phased it out as engine oil is because synthetic oils are superior in every way.
                i mean not bad for a simple crude oil fraction

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If youre never doing enough foreplay that she is lubricated enough from arousal, she might feel pretty negatively about it, but maybe not enough to say anything

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Anon, I think that they are doing the sex in the bum bum...

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Anon I think she's really old (and maybe his mum)

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                homosexual.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                > Rapeseed oil (today we know it as canola)
                LoL and you vall people moronic

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                moron

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >cAnOlA iS sAmE aS rApeSeEd!11
                moron

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Not him, but all canola oil is rapeseed oil, but not all rapeseed oil is canola.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What if I mix extra virgin olive oil and rapeseed oil?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It'll work fine. Asuming you mean food grade canola rapeseed, not industrial rapeseed which is made from varieties with higher erucic acid which might react with your pan. As a few anons have mentioned though I find lard or duck fat seems to work the best.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                .... It is the same. They're synonyms.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Canola oil is the food grade version of rapeseed oil. They come from the same plant but are processed differently, thereby necessitating a different name.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Semantic homosexual

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Cool it with the anti-semantic remarks.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                My seasoning tends to get fricked up sooner or later inevitably because my electric stove gets the pan too hot in the center before the edges even start to get any kind of decent heat in them.

                The things that have helped are cooking with more oil than I think I need, never cooking onions or anything else acidic in the pan, trying my best never to burn anything, and cleaning as lightly as possible when it gets dirty. All of which suggests that whatever seasoning I'm getting is extremely fragile, moreso than what others experience.

                Partly this is because due to being a (fake) Peatard I have very limited oil options for cooking. Even by using an iron pan (rather than vintage corning visionware glass or brand new unscuffed nonstick pans etc) and butter and olive oil (rather than ghee or coconut oil or whatever) I am already a terrible Peater, if I started using canola oil and pig lard and so on I'd have to just give up the entire pretense that I've listened to the man at all

                I have tried seasoning with some of the recommended seed oils and such though and invariably it starts out perfectly nonstick and is then ruined in less than a week of normal cooking

                >All of the processing of rapeseed into oil is highly industrialized, involves toxic chemicals (hexane), and
                none of that matters as much as the fact that the oil is essentially PUFA. pure virgin untainted expeller-pressed organic 100.00% rapeseed oil would still be unfit for human consumption

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          aluminum accumulates in the brain and gives you alzheimers

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Or stop flipping it before it releases. 99% of people don't understand the maillard reaction.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I was watching an old Julia Child Show episode the other day, and she described the process of seasoning thusly:
    >put oil in the bottom of the pan and let it sit overnight
    >the next day, put salt in the pan and rub it vigorously
    >then, proceed to cook with it as normal
    wtf, and I bet all her cast iron and carbon steel pans were perfectly well seasoned regardless of having no clue where seasoning comes from.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >where seasoning comes from
      Here's the link to the seminal article on cast iron seasoning, where a chemist first explained the science behind seasoning:
      https://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/
      Of particular interest is that, prior to writing up her opinions on the matter, she had been unable to successfully season her own pans, her common failure being the extreme fragility of her seasoning. But as is typical with females, did not allow this history of failure deter her from sharing her thoughts with the world.
      What I've always found astonishing is that very many people latched on to what she said as though it were gospel, and few people seemed to notice that her claims were falsified by her own documented failures. This has led to many years of people complaining about their inability to form a durable and non-stick layer of seasoning, issues that were documented years earlier by this chemist's own failures.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Here's the link to the seminal article
        You say that, but I've only ever heard of this article because you keep spamming it on Culinaly.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's because you weren't around when that article came out.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Idk but my Mom bought some seasoning oil from one of the ci companies and that stuffs a miracle. I used some on a rusty pan I had when visiting and it fixed it up and has stayed good for years.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the seasoning oil from Lodge is literally just canola oil in a can

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    thin layers. you should wipe off as much oil as you can before putting it in the oven.

    also don't put it in the dishwasher, and don't leave it in the sink overnight or whatever.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Build a fire in backyard or a charcoal grill
    >Let pan burn overnight in the ashes of the fire
    >Once cool, take pan and scour well with soap and steel wool until clean
    >Let dry
    >Heat oven to 400 F
    >Rub a THIN layer of peanut/flaxseed/canola oil all over the pan
    >Put in hot oven and let it bake empty for five or six hours (It might make your kitchen smoky)
    >Re-oil when cool and bake again
    Simple as.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also, if you really want to go nuts, you can rub the pan with sandpaper and get a smooth raw iron finish before you wash it after the fire step.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My brother's ex-girlfriend recommended seasoning cast iron with duck oil.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks but I'll keep the duck fat for actual cooking. She must have been a millionaire or what.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's more than one way to maintain them.

    Once I'm done cooking I let it cool off a bit, if there's a ton of food stuck to the pan I'll put some water in there and let it cook off a little to make it easier to clean. I take it to the sink and just use a stainless steel scrubbing pan to clean the rest of it. Then I take a paper towel and grab a little bit of crisco (any high smoke point oil will work, flax seed oil smells terrible though I'm not sure why so many people recommend it) and just do a very, very light coat over it to prevent rust and store it away. That's it. If I'm cooking eggs or something greasy I don't even bother coating it, just clean and dry it.
    When I first get my carbon steel or cast iron pans I do like 1-2 coats, any more is unnecessary.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Always do a light re-season after every time you cook in da pan.
    >Wash pan (no soap, just hot water)
    >Dry with towel
    >Put back on burner
    >Add a few drops of oil and wipe on
    >Wait until smoke appears
    >Turn off burner and let cool

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cast iron is a meme. Stainless steel is all that you need and wont rust lol.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the moment someone tries to make a science out of something trivial you know its a soy meme

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >what kind of oil you use?
    I have used canola spray can and sunflower oil. Id say spraycan works kinda better, because it is easier to get a thinner film with it.
    But any sort of oil should work.
    >I follow exactly this. The seasoning turns out decent (not much sticks to the pan at 1st) but my issue is the seasoning is gone 10 meals later and most of the food I cook isn't particularly acidic.
    Maybe you overheat your pan somehow?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Here's the 2nd pass with sunflower oil at 500F for >1 hour. ngl it's Actually looking decent. No idea how non stick it is or how long it'll last tho. now for 28 more layers

      if it was me over heating the pan to the point the seasoning fails, wouldn't the food be burnt to charcoal?

      I never season it.

      Wash with hot water and paper towels only, no soap or sponge.

      Pan stays on stovetop and is washed only immediately before cooking. Let the cooking fat, oil, or butter sit in the pan after use, this will prevent rust and build up seasoning layer.

      that's usually what I do or it'll rust, or I have to dry it well and coat it in oil

      Use a non metal scrubbing pad for anything that sticks. This usually happens when heat is not high enough.

      nylon ok? that usually seems to work

      [...]
      >WAIT so you're saying that article is what NOT to do?
      No that article is saying what to do. It's just that the author knows frick-all about cast iron, much less cooking with it, and she decided to post that to flex her chemistry knowledge despite the fact that her own attempts to apply it had ended in failure. If you read the article, she's all about getting the hardest coating possible. Not a care about how non-stick it is, she's assuming that any polymerized surface will be equally non-stick. And not a care for how durable it is, she simply assumes that the hardest polymerized surface will be the most durable. I'm assuming because she's coming from the PTFE world where abrasion and wear on the coating is the main killer of that cookwear. Which is where her inexperience comes into play, since on cast iron cookwear the seasoning is self-repairing, abrasion resistance isn't as important for longevity, other factors come into play, such as how well does the seasoning handle thermal stresses, how vulnerable is it to chipping from shear stress, etc. And her "scientific" seasoning method fails on all points as she herself discovered. She just assumes that this is because she's a cast iron novice, that it's not a fault with her method.

      ah. I wish she woulda made it more obvious. would've saved me some cash and a little time

      >Why not stainless?
      Too expensive, especially for how fiddly it is. Cast iron retains its seasoning better and that makes it less annoying to use, in my opinion.

      >Too expensive
      nta but I gotta say I agree. Most iron pans can be had for under $30 but that's the cheapest a stainless would be, and for who knows what trash sheet metal. But if I can't figure out this seasoning shit I will probably end up dishing out the cash instead of constantly dicking around with iron

      eggs with butter doesn't stick for me. I used vegetable oil once and the eggs stuck instantly. I figure the pan was probably too hot.

      never tried vegetable (soy bean for most brands) but canola and sunflower seem to work well for me, besides butter. I think it'll stick no matter what oil if it's too hot

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Your pan just looks like it's barely been used and then washed too much.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I never season it.

    Wash with hot water and paper towels only, no soap or sponge.

    Pan stays on stovetop and is washed only immediately before cooking. Let the cooking fat, oil, or butter sit in the pan after use, this will prevent rust and build up seasoning layer.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Use a non metal scrubbing pad for anything that sticks. This usually happens when heat is not high enough.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      nah frick that I don't want rancid fat sitting in the pan on my counter. I wash it after every use unless it's something 100% non stick like eggs. If I cook something crusty I let the pan cool, then fill it with some water and let it simmer for 15 mins which usually loosens it up.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >WAIT so you're saying that article is what NOT to do?
    No that article is saying what to do. It's just that the author knows frick-all about cast iron, much less cooking with it, and she decided to post that to flex her chemistry knowledge despite the fact that her own attempts to apply it had ended in failure. If you read the article, she's all about getting the hardest coating possible. Not a care about how non-stick it is, she's assuming that any polymerized surface will be equally non-stick. And not a care for how durable it is, she simply assumes that the hardest polymerized surface will be the most durable. I'm assuming because she's coming from the PTFE world where abrasion and wear on the coating is the main killer of that cookwear. Which is where her inexperience comes into play, since on cast iron cookwear the seasoning is self-repairing, abrasion resistance isn't as important for longevity, other factors come into play, such as how well does the seasoning handle thermal stresses, how vulnerable is it to chipping from shear stress, etc. And her "scientific" seasoning method fails on all points as she herself discovered. She just assumes that this is because she's a cast iron novice, that it's not a fault with her method.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Don't scrub it so hard and wipe some oil on it after you clean/dry it.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    eggs with butter doesn't stick for me. I used vegetable oil once and the eggs stuck instantly. I figure the pan was probably too hot.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i seasoned mine when i bought it 5+ years ago
    thats it
    It's still like the day i first used it, perfect non stick surface and i even use detergent on it to clean it now and again if i frick up and make a mess. The only thing i do in terms of 'maintenance' is after i've washed it, i just put it back on the heat for 5 or so minutes to dry it out so it cant rust.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    First off why did you post a stock image of some pan instead of the pan you use and have trouble with? I don't understand how anyone can have trouble keeping the seasoning on a pan. What are you doing that strips the seasoning off? If you're just cooking eggs and veggies you should barely need to clean it at all, just hot water so how you're losing seasoning is a little weird.

    I use my pan for almost everything, I'll cook tomatoes in it, sometimes forget over night and just toss it in dish water. If it ever starts to look thin, a half pinky nail bit of lard in while it's hot and a quick wipe and that's that. Nothing ever sticks to it. Shitty pic of me making pancakes and red currant sauce last night.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      And if you think I'm joking about soap being no problem, this is my pan after cooking tomatoes and peppers in it then getting lazy after supper and leaving it to clean the next day. Tossed it in the dish water for five minutes, wiped it out and good to go

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So question for the board, this is my pan, straight after being washed if you've been around here a while you've likely seen it posted a bunch I've had it for about 30 years and use it almost every day. As you can see it now has a few scratches in it because while drunk at Christmas I cut something up in it. It doesn't really affect the performance but it is ugly. At some point I'll sand it down and re-season so the question is, would any of you like to see the process of doing that. If yes I'll make a thread diwn the line when I get to it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Pan a few minutes later frying up bacon and ham to have with left over pancakes.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It already looks pretty flat I dont think sanding will do anything to improve it.
        t. metalworker

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've only ever had problems with rust on the bottom where it doesn't get seasoned often. It's easy to scrub off with steel wool and reseason though. You must be doing something wrong. I rarely wash mine, maybe once a week when it gets gunked up, and I almost never use any soap. I'll usually just throw a little hot water in there and scrape shit off or scrub it, and I might reseason a little bit based on how oily the pan still is.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why is there a new thread about this everyday? just fricking google it c**ts.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Might sound like a dumb questbut can I keep my cookware in the Fridge? Also can I cook with it right after taking out of the Fridge? Or is this a bad idea?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I answer phones.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Well that's a homosexual life choice

        >No YOU

        If you come across something that shows you up just fight back irrationality

        >Might sound like a dumb questbut can I keep my cookware in the Fridge?
        It's not a such good idea when it comes to cast iron.
        >Also can I cook with it right after taking out of the Fridge? Or is this a bad idea?
        Oh, I thought you wanted to store cooked food inside a pan or something.
        Without food you can definitely store it in the fridge, but keep in mind that it would get condensation all over it moment you remove it and its not good.
        [...]
        >if it was me over heating the pan to the point the seasoning fails, wouldn't the food be burnt to charcoal?
        Probably. Idk honestly.
        But it looks like it should. Id call it a day and use it.
        [...]
        Its not that expensive.

        I was thinking everything but the cast Iron, but you say its fine, but then you say it'll get condensation, so it's not fine?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm pretty sure the opposite of this is true.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Do you eat an blockchain often?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Might sound like a dumb questbut can I keep my cookware in the Fridge?
      It's not a such good idea when it comes to cast iron.
      >Also can I cook with it right after taking out of the Fridge? Or is this a bad idea?
      Oh, I thought you wanted to store cooked food inside a pan or something.
      Without food you can definitely store it in the fridge, but keep in mind that it would get condensation all over it moment you remove it and its not good.

      https://i.imgur.com/PS82458.png

      Here's the 2nd pass with sunflower oil at 500F for >1 hour. ngl it's Actually looking decent. No idea how non stick it is or how long it'll last tho. now for 28 more layers

      if it was me over heating the pan to the point the seasoning fails, wouldn't the food be burnt to charcoal?

      [...]
      that's usually what I do or it'll rust, or I have to dry it well and coat it in oil

      [...]
      nylon ok? that usually seems to work

      [...]
      ah. I wish she woulda made it more obvious. would've saved me some cash and a little time

      [...]
      >Too expensive
      nta but I gotta say I agree. Most iron pans can be had for under $30 but that's the cheapest a stainless would be, and for who knows what trash sheet metal. But if I can't figure out this seasoning shit I will probably end up dishing out the cash instead of constantly dicking around with iron

      [...]
      never tried vegetable (soy bean for most brands) but canola and sunflower seem to work well for me, besides butter. I think it'll stick no matter what oil if it's too hot

      >if it was me over heating the pan to the point the seasoning fails, wouldn't the food be burnt to charcoal?
      Probably. Idk honestly.
      But it looks like it should. Id call it a day and use it.

      >Why not stainless?
      Too expensive, especially for how fiddly it is. Cast iron retains its seasoning better and that makes it less annoying to use, in my opinion.

      Its not that expensive.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Its not that expensive.
        Compared to cast iron? And when considering the ease of use for each? Stainless isn't worth the money.

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you are all frickwits. scrub it clean, put olive oil on it and heat it hot enough that the oil is smoking. Everytime the oil stops smoking, wipe MOREon moron. Stop when a black carboniferous layer is formed.
    Store it oiled, cook with oil in it. Cook hot n fast. repeat as needed.

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Don't give up man, you're probably just not drying it after washing

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Unenameled cast iron is a meme.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You got that backwards champ.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You left it too long before cleaning it. Clean after use and re-oil and rub it down and this won't happen.

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Are you using wood or silicone utensils. Don't use metal.
    Also don't use any acidic vegetables like tomatoes.
    And don't leave the pan wet, dry it off as much as possible before stowing it away. Preferably putting it back on the heat, letting it heat up, and having the moisture evaporate that way.

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    so why should I not use ev olive oil for seasoning? I just see articles mentionin not to do it without elaborating further

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It has a very low smoke point and when you overheat the smoke that comes off is carcinogenic. It's one of the reasons you're not typically supposed to cook with olive oil. Most people re-season their pans between use with a thin wipe of oil so if you do that with olive oil and heat it to the smoke point that happens again but instead of dissipating in the air it goes straight into the food you're cooking. So higher smoke point oils and fats are preferable.

      tl;dr if your pan has oil in it that's smoking, don't put food in it if you care about your health.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >so why should I not use ev olive oil for seasoning?
      You can use it. Any oil works.
      But it has very low smoke point and something carbon double bond something whatever I am not chemistry rocket.
      Other thing, it is very expensive.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      electric vehicle olive oil is not appropriate for food

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It has a very low smoke point and when you overheat the smoke that comes off is carcinogenic. It's one of the reasons you're not typically supposed to cook with olive oil. Most people re-season their pans between use with a thin wipe of oil so if you do that with olive oil and heat it to the smoke point that happens again but instead of dissipating in the air it goes straight into the food you're cooking. So higher smoke point oils and fats are preferable.

      tl;dr if your pan has oil in it that's smoking, don't put food in it if you care about your health.

      You can season with and cook with olive oil. When seasoning, wipe on your pan as usual and bake it around 350F. Certain foods are commonly fried at a higher temperature than olive oil smokes, so it's not an appropriate oil to fry, for example, chicken with. However, the majority of what happens in a skillet stays below the smoke point of olive oil, so it's fine, as long as you don't mind the flavor.

      Personally, I don't like cooking some foods with it because it changes the flavor. Sometimes, it's insignificant; other times, like with eggs, I think it adds way too much astringency and bitter odor to an already rather disgusting food. If I'm cooking eggs, I want to COVER UP the putrid sulfur smell with delicious animal fats--butter, bacon grease, etc.--and olive oil is not strong enough or appetizing enough to do that.

      Also, note that many olive oils are actually adulterated with various seed oils, and the maker doesn't have to disclose this. Generally, if it says "cold first press," that's good, but you never really know. Especially those "light" olive oils for frying. Those are definitely cut with rape or soy (i.e. "vegetable oil").

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cast irons are not very good pans. If you're cooking something for a long time or you need a ton of heat retention for oven-based cooking, cast iron is better than nothing but you're sucking in all of the chinese pig iron and weird alloy materials, not to mention whatever weird polymere disaster shit is in the seasoning. Stainless steel or copper with steel outerwrap is the only safe way to cook. Iron is toxic. Polymeres are toxic. Steel is just steel. Save up, get steel. It's better and safer and lasts longer.

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >canola oil
    holy frick, use literally anything else
    >500F
    450F should be enough. Wipe the oil on with a paper towel then wipe as much off as you can with a dry paper towel, bake at 450F for an hour, repeat 3 or 4 times.

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I do this crazy thing called cooking with it. Seriously I don't understand how this is such a common complaint here because my pan has never shown any sign of rust since I purchased it in 2013.

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    just use a ceramic pan

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Lol no

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >The cooking surface is their own ceramic finish called Ti-Cerama. It does not contain any of the potentially harmful 4-letter chemicals such as PTFE, PFOA, and PFOS. It is also free from lead and cadmium which could leak into the food, making cooking surfaces that contain them toxic.
        sounds based to me

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >how tf you all keep your iron pans seasoned?
    That's the neat part, you don't.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Forgot to mention that I'm a drooling moron.

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    here is your non-stick bro

  34. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I bought one and used normal oil to create a couple of layers for cooking, had to let it smoke for a few minutes each time.

    That's it really. Make sure you dry it properly and don't use it for acids

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >But the thing is I no matter how much I try seasoning it, it seems to keep being stripped off some how.

    That's because you're WASHING it. Just use it for frying and simply wipe it out with a paper towel afterward and that's it, it'll remained
    'seasoned" forever.

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I tried using the gas burner on my barbecue today instead of my electric convection stove

    it's 100% my piece of shit electric stove that makes cast iron not work for me

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      guess the pan bottom is warped

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's not. It sits perfectly flat with no wobble.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What do you think is more likely, that this ancient bronze-age tech failed or the stove is not level?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          feels good being an ir chad

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >but my issue is the seasoning is gone 10 meals later and most of the food I cook isn't particularly acidic.
    You have to frequently reseason, that's your problem. A lot of people say you have to reseason every single time, but I reseason 2-3 times a week.

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