how to make good chicken wings

got like a kilogram of them. so far i brined them in like 5% salt water solution with some peppercorns and garlic overnight cause i got into brining recently and i'm trying it out on everything. wat now. should i just cover them in flour or maybe make some batter and what temp to try them at? does doubly fry sounds like a good idea. idk just make this a fried chicken thread, give recommendations

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cram.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not sure why you brined wings, they have a high enough fat content to stay moist with out it. I guess just bake them.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      just experimenting as i've said and i feel like it doesn't just give the meat moisture but also kinda seasons it from the inside

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/AcNAo6Q.jpg

      you're fine with your brine i guess. use baking powder and little to no flour. cook 450F 20min each side. i usually mix garlic powder/smoked paprika/onion powder/black and red pepper with the baking powder. finish by adding franks during the last 5 min of cooking

      you're both recommend baking but i've already bought almost 2 pounds of lard to fry them in lol. also i'm staying at my grandma's and her oven barely works

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Lard might be a little much. I'm sure it would work but the flavor will likely be extremely rich.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          i prefer vegetable fats so i mostly fry in lard, it's cheaper than the cheapest vegetable oils where i'm currently staying at. I've never really found it to have too overpowering taste like duck fat for example. i'm a sucker for rich foods as well and it's gonna be my only meal today

          Take them out of the brine, pat dry with a paper towel, prepare your coatings, and fill a Dutch oven halfway up with peanut oil, you want to maintain 350 degrees.

          For the dry coating, mix 2 parts flour to 1 part corn starch, you can season it if you want. For the wet coating, beat 2 eggs in a bowl. You can add pickle juice to that if you wish, really helps with the flavor.

          Take your dry wings, drag them through the dry coating, then dunk them in the egg mixture, then drag them through the dry coating again. Place them on a cookie sheet with a wire rack. This will dry the coating out a bit and also get rid of excess flour.

          Once your oil is at 350, crank it up a bit to 375 and then drop your wings in. Don't put too many in at a time or they'll stick together. The temperature of the oil will drop after you put them in, so keep an eye on it. You'll probably have to adjust it to hold around 350. Let the wings cook for bout 6 or 7 minutes. This is entirely dependent on the size of the wing, but the color of the fried coating is a pretty good indicator. You'll have to play around with it.

          After they're cooked(or whenever you think they're done), remove the wings from the oil with, ideally, a spider strainer so you can let the oil drain off. Tongs will also work fine. Move the fried chicken to a paper towel lined baking sheet and keep them warm in the oven until you're done frying.

          Hopefully this helps. Frying chicken is an art form, took me years to perfect my recipe. Good luck and happy frying (:

          if this is not ChatGPT then i appreciate the effort, sounds really good. never really got the egg tho, I've only used it while frying for schnitzel, what does it actually do?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Well if it works then it works I guess. I've only ever used peanut oil for my fried chickens.

            And no, it wasn't chatgpt. The egg acts like a binder for the dry coating. Also helps puff it up a bit during cooking. But you don't have to use it, a lot of batter recipes don't require it at all.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        then fricking fry them moron

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >i've already bought almost 2 pounds of lard to fry them in
        as was intended

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          very interesting, what's the book? from what time?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I believe it's from The Taste of Country Cooking by Edna Lewis, published 1976.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      to salt them fricking moron how is that not obvious

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you're fine with your brine i guess. use baking powder and little to no flour. cook 450F 20min each side. i usually mix garlic powder/smoked paprika/onion powder/black and red pepper with the baking powder. finish by adding franks during the last 5 min of cooking

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Take them out of the brine, pat dry with a paper towel, prepare your coatings, and fill a Dutch oven halfway up with peanut oil, you want to maintain 350 degrees.

    For the dry coating, mix 2 parts flour to 1 part corn starch, you can season it if you want. For the wet coating, beat 2 eggs in a bowl. You can add pickle juice to that if you wish, really helps with the flavor.

    Take your dry wings, drag them through the dry coating, then dunk them in the egg mixture, then drag them through the dry coating again. Place them on a cookie sheet with a wire rack. This will dry the coating out a bit and also get rid of excess flour.

    Once your oil is at 350, crank it up a bit to 375 and then drop your wings in. Don't put too many in at a time or they'll stick together. The temperature of the oil will drop after you put them in, so keep an eye on it. You'll probably have to adjust it to hold around 350. Let the wings cook for bout 6 or 7 minutes. This is entirely dependent on the size of the wing, but the color of the fried coating is a pretty good indicator. You'll have to play around with it.

    After they're cooked(or whenever you think they're done), remove the wings from the oil with, ideally, a spider strainer so you can let the oil drain off. Tongs will also work fine. Move the fried chicken to a paper towel lined baking sheet and keep them warm in the oven until you're done frying.

    Hopefully this helps. Frying chicken is an art form, took me years to perfect my recipe. Good luck and happy frying (:

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Here's a good technique for wings like your picture. If you prefer the thicker/crunchier coating you get at commercial places, rub some splashes of water into the flour with your fingers to replicate the messy well used texture of a day's worth of cooking.
    Double frying seems unnecessary unless you're making an enormous batch.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      potato starch supremacy

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i end up doing something similar. tho instead of putting them in flour/starch and then dipping them into water, i just mixed about 2 tablespoons of my seasoned flour with some fizzy (why? i don't even know) water to make a very thin batter, quickly dip it in it and then push it into the flour so it's nicely covered. now i'm letting them rest for like half an hour at room temperature before frying cause i read somewhere that's what you're supposed to do. and then i'm gonna fry them like this guys recommended

      Take them out of the brine, pat dry with a paper towel, prepare your coatings, and fill a Dutch oven halfway up with peanut oil, you want to maintain 350 degrees.

      For the dry coating, mix 2 parts flour to 1 part corn starch, you can season it if you want. For the wet coating, beat 2 eggs in a bowl. You can add pickle juice to that if you wish, really helps with the flavor.

      Take your dry wings, drag them through the dry coating, then dunk them in the egg mixture, then drag them through the dry coating again. Place them on a cookie sheet with a wire rack. This will dry the coating out a bit and also get rid of excess flour.

      Once your oil is at 350, crank it up a bit to 375 and then drop your wings in. Don't put too many in at a time or they'll stick together. The temperature of the oil will drop after you put them in, so keep an eye on it. You'll probably have to adjust it to hold around 350. Let the wings cook for bout 6 or 7 minutes. This is entirely dependent on the size of the wing, but the color of the fried coating is a pretty good indicator. You'll have to play around with it.

      After they're cooked(or whenever you think they're done), remove the wings from the oil with, ideally, a spider strainer so you can let the oil drain off. Tongs will also work fine. Move the fried chicken to a paper towel lined baking sheet and keep them warm in the oven until you're done frying.

      Hopefully this helps. Frying chicken is an art form, took me years to perfect my recipe. Good luck and happy frying (:

      I'll also try your full recipe dude when I'm a bit less drunk lol

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    since i'm feeling experimental and drunk. is there any way to incorporate cheese while making chicken wings. i've got like 5 unpackaged different kinds. usually i just melt some butter withgarlic and parmesan and that's that

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Probably not with wings, but you could filet a few chicken breasts, roll up some cheese inside, and fry those. Like a little jalapeno popper but with undercooked chicken on the inside.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        will focus on the wings today then, cheese should be fine for at least couple more days

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Make a simple cheese sipping sauce (ala chips; Velveeta, cream+shredded cheese+spices) for your hot wings. Great for using leftover/expiring cheese if you cook 'plain' with butter, hot sauce on the side

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          meant for

          since i'm feeling experimental and drunk. is there any way to incorporate cheese while making chicken wings. i've got like 5 unpackaged different kinds. usually i just melt some butter withgarlic and parmesan and that's that

          not

          Probably not with wings, but you could filet a few chicken breasts, roll up some cheese inside, and fry those. Like a little jalapeno popper but with undercooked chicken on the inside.

          kinda drunk myself, deciding on what sloppa is befitting tonight. Went to a concert and could use a snack. Trying to avoid reflux inducing foods

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >cheese sipping sauce
          DO AMERICAN'TS ReALLY??

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            dude it's just a thicker Mornay or bechamel. He ASKED what to do with the cheese. If he's making wings might as well use it for the celery

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Maangchi for wings
    Haven't found a way to make southern fried yet, my grandmother's recipe card that everyone loved forever was basically
    >take chicken
    >add fried

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Trad:
    brine 6+hrs in heavy cream, vinegar, and paprika/cayenne (spice tolerance depending)
    Bake at 400 for 15-20, 350 for 30. Toss in butter, sauce & seasoning of choice (franks & garlic powder / tabasco & lemon pepper / bbq & cajun) finish in oven for broil on low 5-8m.
    Serve with sliced carrots & celery, bleu cheese

    Asian
    Marinate 8+ hrs full wings in equal parts variety near and soy sauce. dash of sesame oil, fish sauce. Glob of chili paste. Minced/sliced ginger, scallion optional, but helps
    Steam fry covered med-med high (size depending) in veg oil & water. Serve with sliced scallion and MSG, honey+oil+chili paste sauce for dippingx0hm

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >asian:
      Equal parts white vinegar & soy sauce
      Holy typo

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just give up and order out

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you're gonna bake, just coat with salt, bakiing powder, a bit of corn starch, and whatever other spices you like. Then bake about 20 on each side, maybe an extra 5 at the end baaed on your oven.
    Toss in whatever sauce you like.
    Based boomer explains it easy enough.

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