>how's the food? >it's fine. >do you really like it? >yeah it's fine

>how's the food?
>it's fine
>do you really like it?
>yeah it's fine

Do you get upset at this? Is it considered rude not to make a big show about how good something is if it's home-made? Do people owe you a reaction if you make something for them?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know. One time my wife tried to make a big deal that I never show enthusiasm for her cooking when she always does for mine. I told her my cooking was usually mediocre so her enthusiasm was obviously faked, and she started crying and I had to sleep in the spare room that night. Anyway, she doesn't give me fake compliments anymore so that sorted that out.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      just compliment her food anon. its not hard

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I tell her if it tastes good, but she was wanting me to get excited like I was experiencing a new revelation in taste. It's tiresome, and I never come across as genuine doing stuff like that anyway.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          you sound like my husband. in the end, it just gets lonely without shared interests and passions. pretending is at least momentarily fun, but some people can't even be assed to do that, or are so closed off emotionally they're incapable of it. see you at the divorce lawyers office.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            fat gay man detected

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I don't but I appreciate honesty. I still lie and say everything is great, always great, never anything but great because it exhausting dealing with people who get themselves into moods by assuming the negative from what I say. Postmodern Western society is weighted this way at all levels of subjectivity; amazing means good, good means not good, fine means bad, bad means awful. I wish I could be honest without people having fits or forming vindictive grudges. Everything his hyperlized.

            You will never be a woman.

            I have a TRICK
            When it's good I take more
            Perfect to score more dessert than you're expected to take and to shut them up

            This doesn't work when you're fat.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            kys

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            based
            people pretend constantly for pretty moronic reasons, if you can't force yourself to be a little excited when your spouse clearly put in effort then your marriage has already failed

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            crusty

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          At least you're not letting the lie go on for 30 years and constantly stressing about it.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        In anon's statement, his food is mediocre in comparison. It was a compliment, a glowing compliment to admit your own ability does not match.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >this is how you destroy your marriage

      Can you start a vlog or something? I want to watch along

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >confide in your partner that you don't have confidence in your cooking
      >she starts her histrionics and you're the bad guy
      Holy shit women are such vile toxic creatures.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I don't know. One time my wife tried to make a big deal that I never show enthusiasm for her cooking when she always does for mine. I told her my cooking was usually mediocre so her enthusiasm was obviously faked, and she started crying and I had to sleep in the spare room that night. Anyway, she doesn't give me fake compliments anymore so that sorted that out.

        she tindered a BBC that night
        not only did she get actual food with flavour and seasoning, she got dicked down by a real man

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Take it to

          [...]

          rabbi.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      you sound like my husband. in the end, it just gets lonely without shared interests and passions. pretending is at least momentarily fun, but some people can't even be assed to do that, or are so closed off emotionally they're incapable of it. see you at the divorce lawyers office.

      Women's obsession with performative bullshit is so tiresome. Just let people be genuine and stop expecting the world to be like some over-the-top TV show or some shit.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >we're at the point now where passion for life is considered ingenuine
        absolutely zogged

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          There's a difference between "passion for life" and "forcing yourself to feign over-the-top excitement that you're not actually feeling in a performative bid for social brownie points and future reciprocation of equally performative feigned excitement."
          Stuff like
          >my wife tried to make a big deal that I never show enthusiasm for her cooking when she always does for mine
          and
          >pretending is at least momentarily fun, but some people can't even be assed to do that, or are so closed off emotionally they're incapable of it
          is such a fake and empty way to go through life. Show excitement when you feel excitement, praise what you feel deserves praise; if you're feigning excitement and praise just to get the same for yourself later that's just selfish and fake and tiresome. Fake enthusiasm is empty and to me it feels far worse than someone simply not reacting. In a way it's downright insulting.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            That's not passion for life, it's being performative.
            If you want to put on a show and make a big deal every time you manage to feel something, go ahead. But don't expect the same of everyone else.

            tl;dr boring chudcels posting about how emotionally mature they are on Culinaly.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Try not to get too dehydrated crying about a post on Culinaly.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              It's easier to say you like to lie to people

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's not passion for life, it's being performative.
          If you want to put on a show and make a big deal every time you manage to feel something, go ahead. But don't expect the same of everyone else.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I told her my cooking was usually mediocre so her enthusiasm was obviously faked
      kek based

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The word "fine" has too much emotional baggage when dealing with women. Never use it when speaking to them.

    To women, "fine" means "I'm not really happy with this, but I'll allow it to suffice"

    For future reference, if a woman asks you how a food is, and it's just fine, say it's "not bad"

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not bad implies its not good either. Just say its good and be done with it.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is it really nothing to you when someone goes out of their way to make a nice meal for you? Thats just no big deal at all, something utterly ordinary its basically the default and generates no real emotional response?

      The meal is a way of saying "i love you" you morons, not feeling anything special about it comes across just as painfully as if you reacted with apathy to physical or verbal affection. If she didn't care about you she'd feed just herself or make you box mac n cheese or something, instead she does the longer more complicated action specifically for your pleasure. It's not anyone's default behavior to do the more annoying thing instead of the easy thing, she does it intentionally from loving you. When you react like its nothing or you take it for granted that hurts.

      This is also why theyre 'performative' if you cook them something. Its not the actual taste thats so delightful, its the expression of your love for them through the act of making it at all.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        you're correct but you're arguing with bangladeshis and 16 year olds

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The fact that you see making a meal as some arduous task that demands celebration and praise beyond simple gratitude shows that you're not doing it only out of love; you're seeking some specific form of validation in return, which is a very transactional mindset. Humble yourself and stop demanding so much from others.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        not anyone you replied to but it sounds as though you are conflating love with debt
        as though the people around you owe you something for merely existing in your presence
        -
        while I agree it's kind to show or be shown gratitude
        you cannot force it
        and if you do try and force love and gratitude from others, you deserve none
        I imagine many like you would be rapists if their desires were shifted towards sex instead of food
        >you WILL love me
        >and you WILL like it
        >or else
        thats the vibe I get and its not a good thing
        be humble like other anon said
        and don't put an emotional price tag on your meals anon
        hidden debt like this
        it's evil. it makes me hate the person dishing it out. and so I tend to try and avoid them and decline their meals as well as their attention
        you are poison
        clean out your heart and mind
        and be like pure water
        accepting and clear, expecting nothing in return

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Why not just lie and say "That's great! I really like the [aspect of it]"

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Good kino.
    Since I do most of the cooking I ask my gf if she liked it, then I'll say something critical about it or a potential improvement for next time so she knows she can speak honestly. Then after that I don't keep asking her about it.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My experience with older generations is that "fine" or "alright" means they actually do like it. I think they were taught to heavily control themselves as children and so don't exclaim in general

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I mean yeah, if you don't control yourself then you are treated as moronic by everyone else, no shit you should control yourself. All this touchy feely shit is because people have forgotten the term public decency.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I probably count as 'older generations' (52) and yeah, if I'd have started pulling s9oyfaces and jumping around slamming myself in the balls with joy over a slight tweak to a meatloaf recipe or something when I was younger, people would have thought I was taking the piss.
      There's also the difference between men an women to consider here. Ask a man if he likes something he will say 'yes'. Ask a woman and, well it doesn't matter what she says because you can guarantee it won't be what she actually means and you'll be in the doghouse anyway for not instinctively figuring out what the frick she did actually mean. They're literally incapable of dealing with straight answers to simple questions, everything has to have five layers of manufactured complexity added on top.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have a TRICK
    When it's good I take more
    Perfect to score more dessert than you're expected to take and to shut them up

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Life is not like one of those ADHD youtube videos, where everyone is constantly being dramatic, bewildered and hyperventilating over every little thing; many people are quiet and understated, where if they like something they will say so, no more, no less.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah, I get pretty upset if someone tries to give me a survey while I'm eating.
    If I'm eating it, I like it. Let me fricking finish and I'll be more specific. Prissy b***h.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i get pissed when they don't criticize it when i know i fricked it up

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Same. My wife just gives one word answers, no matter how much I try to lead her to constructive criticism. Drives me crazy! I have the decency to point out all of her errors and tell her where she can improve the dish, I give detailed critiques of every meal she makes, and all I get when I cook is "mmhhmm" and "fine".

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        lol. I'm not your wife, but I'm always happy to eat hot food someone else made for me. My landlord will occasionally offer me food, and I always feel somewhat anxious there isn't something more for me to say besides thank you. Sometimes the food is dull, but I'm still grateful for free food. sometimes I'm not hungry right away. i worry about seeming rude alot, and i have no cooking Talent or knowledge so i don't see myself criticising food, unless a major frick up happened.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Detailed critiques of [i]every[/i] meal? Does she even want that? Sounds like meal time is just something to get through with minimal engagement for her at this point.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If my spouse says my cooking is "fine" or "pretty good" I know I've fricked up because when it's actually good they do make a big deal out of it. It isn't rude per se, but I always immediately ask what I could do better or what could be added next time to take it up a notch.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Saying 'fine' when prompted for your opinion on a meal is like saying "meh" "it's food" "it's edible" "I'm satiated". 'Fine' is a non-answer.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    TFW he doesn’t compliment me lobster.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >make new dish I don't like at all
    >family loves it
    strange feel

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I always say the food is good even when it isn't because I know it took a lot of effort and don't wanna insult the person that cooked it
    I don't make big reactions though I am man and that would be fricking gay

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Clean plates and no leftovers is the only compliment I need.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Depends. In some cultures it's a compliment to leave a small bite left on the plate as a sign that you've been feed too much

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >In some cultures
        Name two (2).

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >In some cultures
          >Name two (2).
          Muslim and Christian

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Neither of those are cultures, they're ideologies.
            And I've never once heard of wasting food being a sign of praise among Christians.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Step mom is a pretty terrible cook
    >Literally the "White people don't season their food" meme, she probably thinks ketchup and mayo is spicy
    >Food is 99% of the time bland as frick
    >She is also very bipolar so if you didn't pretend to like the food or eat everything on your plate she would become extremely angry (a very bipolar anger; slamming doors, screaming, bullying, etc)
    On the bright side, it desensitized me so much that literally most food other people cook almost always tastes good.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My mum could take a fair critique of her food, but she is pretty good cook, so there is rarely stuff for critique.

    I don't have courage to criticize my granny's cooking.
    For her, feeding others is... important. I don't know. Way to express love? Something she considers her duty as woman? Something she derives her self worth from? I can't quite explain.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >dating a girl who was gluten free and pretty much vegetarian (or maybe vegan)
    >she makes me spaghetti using uncooked spinach and ragu, no other herbs or anything
    >barely warm, runny, no flavor
    >too autistic not to tell her I didn't like it and that I'd show her I could do better
    >make a red sauce from scratch for her
    >she said it was "okay" and that she liked hers better
    that was the most pissed off I had ever been with cooking for someone

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Hope you dropped that b***h. Her tounge is broken.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        oh definitely, she was just a short thing for me
        honestly culinary compatibility is important to me, as in if I can't cook for you I don't want it

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      She knew yours was better but couldn't bring herself to compliment you for it. Maybe she felt inadequate and that was her way of punishing you for it, who knows.
      Women, especially mothers and grandmothers, get very passive aggressive when they feel they've been outdone in the kitchen. Couldn't say why.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I always praise my mom's cooking and it's genuinely good but she got so upset at me telling her my meatballs are better than hers lmao. It's odd because she always wants me to make them and there's a lot of other dishes I make she loves.
        Also had a few feminist leaning gfs who didn't really cook. I had to teach them how to pan fry chicken breast but they'd get upset when I told them I am the better cook.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >pan fry chicken breast
          Absolute cooklet.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >do you get upset at this?
    No. I'm not 12. I understand that it's okay for people to tell little white lies instead of being rude. Of course if someone says my food is "fine" I understand that they weren't exactly enthusiastic about it. I appreciate that more than fake praise, and if my food could have been better I was probably already thinking the same thing (of course if they don't like it and I thought it turned out great I really don't care either).

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I hate it when people try and draw a forced reaction out of me, if that is what you are referring to.
    The chef or food prep *should* wait until after the meal is done, then ask what their audience/customers/family think of it.
    You receive more honest reactions that way.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I am rarely impressed with food. Most of my own cooking is alright at best. The best foods I have eaten are often rare ingredients or preparations, gifted to me, that are unaltered by end-user cooking (Honey, Preserved lemons, chocolate, beef, etc,.)

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