I heated up a bunch of pans to see how evenly they boil water on a common type of gas stove burner.

I heated up a bunch of pans to see how evenly they boil water on a common type of gas stove burner. I feel like this gives a much more real-world view of heating than the IR false color infographic that goes around this board. Thoughts?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    no one cares about how evenly a pan will heat water (lmao) because it's fricking water. yes what you put into the pan affects it's characteristics.

    summary: you are a moron!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >moron doesn't understand thermal mass
      Go back to Culinaly

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i'm sure you know tons about mass, fatty

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >no one cares about how evenly a pan will heat water (lmao) because it's fricking water.
      Bubble size directly correlates to temperature.

      >yes what you put into the pan affects it's characteristics.
      I commonly put sauce into a frying pan while cooking, so this is a perfect simulation of real life use.

      Summary: you're a moron.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      rare time that OP is not the homosexual, you nailed it son good work

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >YoU cAnT jUsT uSe WAtEr

      Why not, bro?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >nobody cares
      >you're wrong because I said so!

      i'm sure you know tons about mass, fatty

      >you're a fatty!

      You just wanted to show your expensive pan collection aren't you?

      >moooommmm, how come timmy gets to have TWO pans???

      Boiling water is not an accurate representation of heat distribution.

      >you're wrong because I said!

      https://i.imgur.com/DBxnECX.jpg

      >has time for all this autistic horseshit
      >stove is disgusting

      >I'm gonna tell my mommy on you!

      You know that all of the particles in the water have to reach the same temperature before it boils, right?

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enthalpy_of_vaporization

      >you've been fact-checked!

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm sorry you wasted time taking pictures and doing stupid shit for no reason.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          How injured you are.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    that's a bad way too. I suggest doing something that browns, like dunno, a tortilla or pancake.
    More realistic scenario too.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      or maybe pour tempered chocolate and then heat it up and see where it melts first.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >that's a bad way too. I suggest doing something that browns, like dunno, a tortilla or pancake.
      >More realistic scenario too.
      This would be a *different* scenario. I suggest you do this yourself. I'm not your personal tortilla browner.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don't have fancy clad pans. I only have non-stick, cast iron, and bottom spreader stainless (walls are thin).
        But I can make guess that non-stick would be the best, because it is chunky aluminium with thickness and thermal mass comparable to CI, but unlike CI it also conducts heat very well.
        Dunno, i only care for holywars

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, I wouldn't dry heat anything in your nonstick pan, tortilla or otherwise.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            works fine. Chinkshit induction cooktop has temperature control.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think I own a Cuisinart.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My thoughts (OP):
    -Tiny bubbles are places where water has not boiled yet. On my stove, the center of the burner blocks flames, and creates this cool spot in the center of the pan. In a properly preheated pan, I'd expect the center to be much hotter. This test is just a demonstration of each pan's ability to conduct heat from a stove's flames, which does happen when frying, once your pan starts to cool due to adding the food.

    -For All-Clad, there's basically no difference between D3 and G5. Maaaybe I can see more boiling closer to the center in the G5, but it still couldn't get the water in the center of the pan boiling.

    -The D5 pan conducted heat less evenly than both, despite being on a smaller burner, which should have had the opposite effect.

    -Demeyere Atlantis pans took much longer to boil the water, but the skillet is marginally more even-conducting than the All-Clad pans.

    -The Demeyere saute pan was actually incredible in comparison. Despite having the thickest base, it heated up faster than the Atlantis skillet, and much more evenly. There was only a tiny cool spot in the center. After 2.5 minutes, almost all the water was boiling rapidly.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Probably due to the Atlantis saute pan having copper and silver layers. The skillets are just aluminum layers in the middle

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Interesting, I appreciate the spirit of discovery and thorough write up.

      If you get the urge to test further might I suggest using sugar? Might provide a different view based on which areas melt first.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You just wanted to show your expensive pan collection aren't you?

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Boiling water is not an accurate representation of heat distribution.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Turns out that's wrong.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah his gay little experiment was indeed wrong because of that fact.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's the same pan in all pictures

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You cracked the puzzle.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    BEHOLD my wondrous invention to solve the uneven heat problem. Ate, wallah! You wreck car!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sure. You can use any pan and just stir the food. But if you're searing a steak, then the sear is not going to apply to the steak perfectly evenly unless you know how your pan heats.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >anon uses wood instead of plastic
      >makes completely nonsensical post
      blessed moron

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >has time for all this autistic horseshit
    >stove is disgusting

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >he doesn't season his stovetop

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You know that all of the particles in the water have to reach the same temperature before it boils, right?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enthalpy_of_vaporization

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >YOU JUST GOT FACT CHECKED!
      This doesn't mean what you think it means. Ever put liquid into your skillet to reduce into a sauce? No? Just means you don't know what you're talking about.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    looks like an experiment with no scientific value
    covering the surface of the pans with flour will probably give a better indication

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >looks like an experiment with no scientific value
      You said that already. You still haven't explained why this supposedly "doesn't follow the science." This is exactly how cooking works.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Clean youre stove

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They all look to have similar levels of boilingness.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Bingo.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's impossible to tell anything from these photos. if you want to make an actual useful comparison and can't afford an IR camera, just sprinkle flour on the pans and see where it burns first. pic rel.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why do you think this is any different?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        because water is a liquid

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Nucleation points are more responsible for bubble formation than a difference in heat distribution.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >i dont trust objective thermal imaging
    >let me redo this with a fluid where now I have to worry about stochastic flow and an additional layer of thermal gradients and conductivity

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >that fricking rentoid stove

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Now, why would anyone need 4 different 10" – 11" pans of the same material?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Because OP is the kind of moron that assembles useless trash infographics. Probably has so many pans because they never do their dishes, is the stove is an indication.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Because OP is the kind of moron that assembles useless trash infographics. Probably has so many pans because they never do their dishes, is the stove is an indication.

      Who hurt you?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You did with your idiocy, it literally pains me.

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