I'm supposed to cook a 16 pound brisket for a cookout on Saturday. What can I do to make this shit great?

I'm supposed to cook a 16 pound brisket for a cookout on Saturday. What can I do to make this shit great? I'll be able to use a friend's trager but it's the first time I'll ever be cooking one in a smoker, usually I bake or slow cook it. Any recommendations for rubs or marinades or even cook times?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    my recommendation is to bake it. it’s very hard to do in a smoker and you’re probably going to frick it up your first time.

    i baked a 15lb brisket for friendsgiving last year and fed like 20 people and it was amazing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >it’s very hard to do in a smoker
      how??? there are literally thousands of videos that show you exactly how to do it, and pellet grills are extremely easy to use.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think brisket is best done simply, just rub generously with coarse salt and pepper. If you do the Texas crutch (saves time, prevents drying out) pour some beef broth in when you wrap.
    Most important thing is to start cooking early enough, 16lbs will take a long time to get tender. I usually try to have it ready 4 hours before I plan to serve because it always takes longer than expected. You'll want to rest it for an hour before slicing anyway and brisket will hold just fine for hours in a cambro if it ends up being ready early.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >mfw
    Damn, they really aren't lying about HFCS being in almost everything

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Add some cocoa powder to your dry rub, that shits a real game changer. You'll get your dick wet, guaranteed.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    1/4" fat cap
    Top rack, fat side down
    Put large drip pan on bottom rack filled with water
    Thermometer in the fattest part of the flat
    Cook till it hits the stall at ~140 and then Texas crutch
    When you get to 190 start doing the probe test
    Probe the connective tissue, it's done once the probe easily pierces through like butter.

    Every brisket is different, some are done at 190, some are done as high as 210.
    Just keep an eye on it, feel it, prove it and you'll know when it's done.

    Most of the time mine are just at 200 when I pull them.
    It takes a painfully long time to smoke brisket, you can't rush it. Make sure you have ample time to smoke and to rest the meat before eating.

    I like Clarks Jackd rub or Meatheads big bad rub
    https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/spice-rubs-and-pastes/big-bad-beef-rub-recipe/

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >some are done as high as 210.
      This is objectively false, the highest temp you should be going for is 205, ideally you want to pull it at 204 that way carry over heat will take you to 207 which is the temp where all collagen will be broken down to gelatin.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This homie must be cooking the same exact uniform lab grown meat with scientific grade equipment.

        Every piece of meat is different. Every thermometer reads differently.
        Absolute temps mean nothing and only idiots obsess over them.

        You have 16lbs of meat, the point is 3x thicker than the flat
        It's a very fine balance getting both sides tender without under or overcooking one of them

        Worrying about what the actual number your 2$ chink thermometer that came with your traeger says is a sure fire way to frick that up.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The temperature needed to break down connective tissues is well known though as is the concept of carry over heat.
          Pulling a brisket at 203-205 then resting it in towels in a cooler will objectively result in better meat than pulling it at 210 and doing the same.
          I'm sorry you are wrong and moronic, maybe things will improve though for you.

          Do some research before spouting oversimplified nonsense.

          What's factually wrong about the fact that in beef at 207 collagen will be largely broken down to gelatin?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >The temperature needed to break down connective tissues is well known though as is the concept of carry over heat.

            It's also well known that smokers have hot spots and cold spots. It's also well known that the thicker part of the meat heats slower than the thinner part.
            It's also well known that cheap thermometers have acceptable tolerances and aren't directly on the money.

            Nobody gives a shit about your meat smoked in a laboratory. This is the real world we are talking about.
            The only people who want to die on this hill clearly don't have a ton of real world experience.

            If you blindly pull your meat at a specific temp, you are a moron.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >It's also well known that smokers have hot spots and cold spots.
              Get a better smoker, mine has 7f of variance across the entire cooking chamber.
              >It's also well known that the thicker part of the meat heats slower than the thinner part
              Who temps the thinner part of meat, what a moronic point to make.
              >It's also well known that cheap thermometers have acceptable tolerances and aren't directly on the money
              That's a very easy fix and you should have a nice thermometer anyway.
              You are very moronic and pretty disingenuous.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Listen to this homie, saying his smoker has 7f variance across it, looked it up and even the expensive Meater thermometer has a 1.5f tolerance (so it could be 198.5 or 201.5 when it says it's 200.
                And he openly acknowledges that where you probe the meat has a big change in what the actual temp is.

                All this variance in the equipment, anyone who has ever smoked a brisket knows you'll get a 3 or 4 degree swing when temping the flat vs the point.

                But he still sits here trying to save face by lying through his teeth.
                Stop it anon. No need to be stupid and lazy, you out the time in to smoke it, how about putting in the time to actually test and pull your meat when it's actually ready?

                Do you cite scientific papers when you feed people torched, tough and dry flat of your briskets?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I have a Shirley smoker, it absolutely does have that level of heat variance across the cooking chamber because it is made from nearly 1 ton of steel.
                Testing it involved 6 thermoworks probe thermometers through the probe ports and set in different sections of the chamber.
                The resolution of the probes thermocouples was 1.8f.
                Just get a better smoker and you won't struggle as much.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Do some research before spouting oversimplified nonsense.

          >The temperature needed to break down connective tissues is well known though as is the concept of carry over heat.

          It's also well known that smokers have hot spots and cold spots. It's also well known that the thicker part of the meat heats slower than the thinner part.
          It's also well known that cheap thermometers have acceptable tolerances and aren't directly on the money.

          Nobody gives a shit about your meat smoked in a laboratory. This is the real world we are talking about.
          The only people who want to die on this hill clearly don't have a ton of real world experience.

          If you blindly pull your meat at a specific temp, you are a moron.

          >It's also well known that smokers have hot spots and cold spots.
          Get a better smoker, mine has 7f of variance across the entire cooking chamber.
          >It's also well known that the thicker part of the meat heats slower than the thinner part
          Who temps the thinner part of meat, what a moronic point to make.
          >It's also well known that cheap thermometers have acceptable tolerances and aren't directly on the money
          That's a very easy fix and you should have a nice thermometer anyway.
          You are very moronic and pretty disingenuous.

          i enjoy everyone calling each other morons over temperatures! nice work my friends!

          i mean this completely unironically as i am also fat and moronic!

          for me i have le big green egg (as i said, i am a fat moron!) i have a nice thermometer as well and usually pull at a specific set temp but that is not always the case 100% of the time so i guess you are both kind of right at least for my case.

          also, i typed this while shitting my friends!

          3-2-1 ribs are the best ribs you'll ever have

          no they arent and you are gay and moronic

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Imagine that. You figured out what your grade of meat, from your butcher with your specific thermometer and smoker liked to cook at.
            With experience everyone does and this whole finishing process isn't really a big deal.

            Too bad OP has never smoked before and is doing it for the first time.
            Imagine telling OP what temp to pull based off your green egg, or what some random YouTuber claimed you should instead of telling him to actually pulling the meat when it feels done.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Do some research before spouting oversimplified nonsense.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          3-2-1 ribs are the best ribs you'll ever have

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >fat side down
      You can ignore everything this moron says

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