irish cuisine

what're some quintessential irish dishes I can make in light of saint paddy's day?
>nb4 potato famine jokes

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    a six pack of Guinness

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Go to a pub or bar and get a pint of Guinness.
    Irish Breakfast.
    Coddle.
    Colcannon.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What DO the irish eat other than potatoes?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Stew

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Potato stew?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Press Ctrl+T and search "Irish dishes" it's that simple.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I’m on my phone. No ctrl button.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Explains the low IQ.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I’m not dumb. My momma had me tested.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Oats

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Cabbage, corned beef, battered sausages, chicken fillet sandwiches

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i've heard they have good cheese

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >What DO the irish eat other than potatoes?
      The same as the English, sorry to disappoint the Plastic Paddies but the Irish have no distinct cuisine at all.
      Anything the Irish eat was already eaten in England.
      The only decent thing from Ireland is Guinness but that is now brewed in Africa and Malaysia.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Same shit as what english people do. "Irish breakfast" is almost the exact same thing as "full english", etc.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      four-in-one

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Whiskey

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    irish food is just an inferior version of british food, which isn't that good to begin with.
    Go get drunk then get yourself some fish & chips and believe me when I say Ireland hasn't anything better to offer food-wise.

    >b-but me mum's irish stew!!!!
    sorry cormac, it's really not that good

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Paddy's

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I made stew, cabbage as a side dish.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/7dq75Yc.jpg

      Like the look of it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Looks delicious

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No it doesn't

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >what're some quintessential irish dishes I can make in light of saint paddy's day?
    irish seafood chowder
    to be eaten with good irish soda bread

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >irish seafood chowder
      No such thing.
      Mention this to a real Irishman and they will have a blank look on their face (they usually do anyway)
      It's only Americans that invent 'so-called Irish dishes' .

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Irish are inherently American. Most people in ireland immigrated to America long ago, they used to have a much bigger population

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Irish are inherently American
          Many Americans would like to think so.
          Although some Irish did emigrate to America, it's no where near on the scale it's reported to be.

          I have a relative in America who got Married in an Irish church (whatever that is) excluded the Father of the Bride (because he is English) and for the life of us, we can't explain where this fake Irish heritage comes from. Perhaps it's a trendy thing or just fitting in with their social circle.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >>no where near on the scale it's reported to be
            It actually is, ireland used to have more than 30mil people. The vast majority of which left to America, there's only 4mil left in ireland.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Although some Irish did emigrate to America, it's no where near on the scale it's reported to be.
              What do you mean? at a time when the United States had a population of 30-40 million something like 2 million Irish emigrated over the course of like 10 years. Irish made up 10% of the Union Army in the US civil war. Even still more would emigrate at the turn of the century. Is that not a significant scale? or do you dispute the numbers?

              >or do you dispute the numbers?
              >6 Million israelites died in 'The Holocaust'

              I dispute the numbers.
              The Irish have always been poor and could not have afforded the boat fare in the numbers you suggest.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Until the 19th century most of the Irish came to America as indentured servants

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Although some Irish did emigrate to America, it's no where near on the scale it's reported to be.
            What do you mean? at a time when the United States had a population of 30-40 million something like 2 million Irish emigrated over the course of like 10 years. Irish made up 10% of the Union Army in the US civil war. Even still more would emigrate at the turn of the century. Is that not a significant scale? or do you dispute the numbers?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Although some Irish did emigrate to America, it's no where near on the scale it's reported to be.
            You don't know what you are talking about.
            >Irish church (whatever that is)
            A Catholic church in an Irish neighborhood.
            >we can't explain where this fake Irish heritage comes from. Perhaps it's a trendy thing or just fitting in with their social circle.
            The short of it is that for the vast majority of US history your ancestry determined you location on the social hierarchy on top of that specific immigrant groups were settled in specific regions which is why places like the Midwest are full of German and Polish last names.

            [...]
            >or do you dispute the numbers?
            >6 Million israelites died in 'The Holocaust'

            I dispute the numbers.
            The Irish have always been poor and could not have afforded the boat fare in the numbers you suggest.

            >I dispute the numbers.
            The numbers come from census data I.E. for tax collection purposes and both governments affirm them, they're not comparable to holocaust numbers which are contradicted by census data.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Fish and chips, shepard's pie, guiness beef stew
    t.irish family that eats this

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That guy definitely doesn’t look like he is suffering from a potato famine.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/irish-beef-guinness-stew/#recipe

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Colcannon is really fricking good.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Does he think the I-95 is some uniquely Philadelphia thing?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Pennsylvanians have little to hang their hats on

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Butler’s Irish Chocolate is among the best I’ve ever had and this surprised me when I first tasted it because Ireland is not known for its Chocolate

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >in light of
    that's not how you use "in light of". thats only used when it's something unexpected. st paddys day is the same day every year so it's not a surprise, instead you should say "in honour of"

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The meaning of that term is equivalent to saying "due to the importance of," the "light" is St Patty's Day and it's "casting its light" onto related subjects of discussion. It's absolutely an appropriate way to use the term

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