Is it just me? I use those frickers like 2-3 times a week. Where's the love, man?

Is it just me? I use those frickers like 2-3 times a week. Where's the love, man?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What do you use them for?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I buy Cento whole peeled San Marzanos by the case. We always have four or five cans at least in our pantry. Get 'em from Amazon, they're like $4.50 a can.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I buy them at a discount in dented cans from the supermarket.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I do the same but get them from Costco. I only bother getting whole peeled and paste, because it's easier to mash or puree them myself than it is to stock a bunch of different versions of the same thing, plus the whole tomatoes tend to be the best quality ones.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        They sell them at Costco!? I swear I've never seen them at the one in Van Nuys. I need to look closer.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    tubes are much more convenient

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Cost more, but convenient, yes.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I got a convenient tube for ya, RIGHT HERE PAL

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      as much as I hate wasting a little bit of sauce when using cans because it's not the right portion, these things end up being so much more expensive it's better just to waste

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      cento puree is just blended tomatoes, that napolina "puree" is concentrated tomada paste. different naming conventions.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I make pizza and sauce for my meatball subs with this, only thinf better is fresh. The pre-made sauces are hot garage.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    is there a taste difference between puree, crushed, and whole peeled or is it all the same?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I haven't taste-tested them, but I'll say that I buy whole peeled because they're more versatile. I can use them as they are, or I can crush them, or if I want a puree I can make one in the food processor.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        with the whole peeled have you noticed if it says "italian style" or "certifed" on your label? certified 28 oz costs twice as much as italian 28 oz on Amazon fresh theres got to be a reason for that?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Must be a newbie. Check out the Alton Brown episode on San Marzano tomatoes, Ethan Chlebowski also did a good video explaining the difference on youtube.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >watch two full length documentaries
            >you have 24 hours to find the jade monkey by midnight
            you really couldn't just give a simple answer to that question dude ?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          These are the ones I buy, the certified San Marzano ones. I know it's a little pretentious, but I've tried a lot of whole tomatoes in the same recipe and imo the Cento San Marzanos are much better than any other I tried.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          the tomatoes inside may not be san marzano

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            but do they still taste the same?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              probably not

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          As others have said, san marzano is a specific tomato grown in a specific region with strict growing guidelines. Italian style means there's basil packed in the can as well as being some assortment of plum style tomatoes.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      it's mostly a texture difference for different recipe consistencies. puree/paste will be more pronounced but that's just because it's been broken down and opened up. if you stuck a whole peeled one in a blender it would taste the same

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Brian Lagerstrom said in his latest videos that he prefers whole peeled canned tomatoes and doesn't use pre-diced ones because they contain calcium chloride which makes them too firm

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You eat 56 to 84 ounces of tomato puree per week?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That's the only brand and style i use for anything. Sauce? Cento Puree. Chili? Cento Puree. Vindaloo? Cento Puree.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Absolutely based. I keep cans of high quality tomato paste around for making my own spaghetti sauce, mostly, but it works well for sloppy joes, chilli, anything that needs a tomato sauce really. My kitchen feels naked if I don't have some cans of it in the pantry because its too damn useful.
    That reminds me, I really should make my own meatball subs one day.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Coincidentally I made meatball subs for the family for dinner just last week. Lemme tell you: Bake your own bread or don't bother. I cut the corner and used grocery-store rolls (high-quality ones but still) and the subs were bland and boring. The meatballs were good, the sauce was good, the cheese was good, but the bread was just …bleh. Big letdown. Next time I'll bake my own.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if you can find a decent bakery hoagie the effort/result of making your own doesn't make a lot of sense.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    World's easiest spaghetti sauce:

    1 tbsp good-quality olive oil in a skillet or saute pan. Add enough crushed garlic to make up about a tablespoon; double if you're super into garlic. Let saute for like ten seconds, then dump in an undrained can of Cento whole peeled San Marzanos. (The tomatoes will break down durin gcooking, but you can nudge them along by mashing them with a spatula.) Cook at a strong simmer for about 11 minutes (just enough time to boil some spaghetti), then turn off the heat and scatter in a tablespoon or so of fresh basil. Transfer the spaghetti to the pan with tongs or whatever and then bring over about a tablespoon of pasta water. Turn or toss until the sauce is glossy and the spaghetti is coated. Serve with lots of parmesan and some toasted garlic bread.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That's not EL PATO and you should feel ashamed! Now go bury yourself in a hole or something!

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I like Cento but I always get the San Marzano [whole].
    I'll try out the puree since it's cheaper but I have a feeling the quality will be inferior.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I buy the whole San Marzanos because they can't hide lower quality tomatoes in that can. if it's puree'd or diced or crushed or sauce, I don't trust that they didn't mix in inferior tomatoes

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Good Man

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Does anyone know what would be a proper San Marzano alternative in Tokyo?
    I can order some from Rakuten and I probably will, just to have a reference for how it's "supposed" to taste like, but I'd like an option that doesn't cost an arm and a leg.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      no asiatics sorry

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

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