Mehssaka

Anyone else get really excited about a dish, spend a bunch of time, money, energy to make it and then when you take the first bite. Meh, is that it?

Just had this experience with this famous Greek dish called Moussaka.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    lovely shepherd's pie there mate

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's not shepperds pie you retarded fuck. Jesus fucking cheist you're dumb

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, that's a cottage pie, mate. Fookin ell.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >browned potato top
        >minced meat bottom
        looks like it to me

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Does shepherds pie have eggplant in it? Because Moussaka does. Does shepherds pie have bechamel in it? Because Moussaka does. Does shepherds pie have nutmeg and allHispanice in it? Because Moussaka does.
          Fuckwad.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            stop being so autistic. moussaka is just the greek word for shepherds pie.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Almost every time I cook for myself.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    yeah, I think that's why most people don't like cooking.

    to spend all the time, money, and it came out underwhelming

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I never trust anyone who says they just made a thing and then posts a google image. You're too scared to post what you made because you know everyone would just say it looks like shit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      this nagger gets it
      OP fucked up. OP fucks up every time and is disappointed because he fucked up AGAIN

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      To be fair, I would never post an original pic on Culinaly, because of anonymous hackers. Not taking the chance I can be backtraced.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No "hackers" are going to "backtrace" you for posting your shitty moussaka. Jesus christ...

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    had one in turkey, absolutely loved it

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Moussaka is fine, but Pastitsio is the true winner of Greek lasagana-adjacent dishes. Try some Pastitsio, you won't regret it.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i'd rather name a dish i made because i had the right leftovers without expecting much but loved

    and that would be american sausage gravy.

    as for dishes i was disappointed in. i'd say beef bourgignon. i did everything right (i think), followed the recipe as close as i could, except for no pearl onions. it was tasty but not great. i think i just don't like red wine sauces because i didn't like coq au vin that much either.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      forgot pic

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i'd rather name a dish i made because i had the right leftovers without expecting much but loved

        and that would be american sausage gravy.

        as for dishes i was disappointed in. i'd say beef bourgignon. i did everything right (i think), followed the recipe as close as i could, except for no pearl onions. it was tasty but not great. i think i just don't like red wine sauces because i didn't like coq au vin that much either.

        Your bourgignon looks very good. Would happily eat a plate of it.
        Also that's cool you liked sausage gravy. Did you have it over American biscuits? That's the best. I have that for breakfast probably 3-4 times a month. Goes great with either some fried eggs or hash brown potatoes on the side.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          thanks
          no just regular eurofag bread unfortunately
          i'm sure biscuits taste like heaven, because of all that butter, because i frequently make an adjacent chink recipe that's simpler. but i just hate working with dough. and your american biscuits need folding over, using a counter i have to clean, etc. but i'm sure they're amazing with this recipe though.
          vid related, chink recipe i use

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        To be fair, that doesn't look very good. Looks like it came out of some kind of instant packet - however that works.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i scoured this whole wretched slav city for french wine from the burgundy region in particular and i made my own broth from beef bones i roasted.
          if anything, my problem might have been due to proportions. maybe with less red wine i would have liked it.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >scoured this whole wretched slav city for french wine from the burgundy region in particular
            That's really unnecessary. Any pinot noir or similarly dry red would work just find. There should be a good amount of wine in the dish, but it shouldn't taste like you're just eating straight wine.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              i suppose i can give it a shot with less wine, and i'll probably like it, but at that point is it even proper beef bourgignon?
              when i make foreign recipes i do care about authenticity, not because i think the authentic recipe is best, but because i want to actually taste what people around the world taste when they eat their food.

              Try sauce bordelaise. The flavour of red wine is definitely there but you get the meat and tomato flavour of the sauce espagnole or demi glace much more than in the more rustic ragouts.

              thanks for the idea, ages ago i was looking at sauce bordelaise but i thought it was too hard to source all the ingredients. but as it happens i have a lot of free time coming up so i should be able to either make my own bordelaise or do enough research to find a source for the ingredients.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Sauce bordelaise or espagnole don't really call for strange ingredients.
                Bordelaise is just red wine, shallot, bay leaf, thyme, white pepper (black one obviously works too), lemon juice and bone marrow.
                The hard to get part for espagnole/demi glace is veal shanks for the fond which calls for veal (and sometimes also beef) shanks, some additional bones, pork rind, onions, carrots, parsley, thyme and bay.
                Espagnole/demi glace is just brown roux, some additional onions and carrots, a bit of lean bacon, more thyme and bay and massive amounts of the fond. Demi glace traditionally also calls for madeira but it can be left out.
                If you actually plan to make it rather make a large batch and freeze it in portions. I always wait for veal shanks being on sale and then buy 5 kg of them. I use the Escoffier recipes but only use veal as the fond you get is more versatile without the additional stronger beef flavour.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You've never set foot in a kitchen, have you?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Try sauce bordelaise. The flavour of red wine is definitely there but you get the meat and tomato flavour of the sauce espagnole or demi glace much more than in the more rustic ragouts.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/dyzfC3g.jpg

      forgot pic

      the key is to do the vegetables separately. I know exactly what those carrots and mushrooms taste like, it's just disappointing. I wouldn't say that it ruins the whole dish but it's also not worth the time and effort if you do everything in one pot. that really is peasant food. we don't have to do it like that anymore

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        another advantage is that you can store the beef bourguignon in much smaller containers and store it in the fridge for about a week without having to eat mush vegetables that taste nothing like vegetables. the beef will still be great and you just saute a couple vegetables while you warm up the beef and boil some potatoes

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Youstill use some vegetables or champignon trimmings as aromatics and then make the other as garnitures.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          yea that's what I usually do. I usually discard the aromatics because they taste like ass

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        how do you prepare the veggies though? I imagine you won't just boil them.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          boil the carrots with the potatoes for a bit. if they're really thick you have to boil them longer obviously. then you just saute them in a butter oil mixture with the onions. if you start with bacon you get extra flavor from that fat. you don't have to use pearl onions because we all know how annoying they are to peel and how expensive they are. yellow onions work as well even if it won't look as pretty

          here are more options, just skip to the garnish part

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Youstill use some vegetables or champignon trimmings as aromatics and then make the other as garnitures.

        yea that's what I usually do. I usually discard the aromatics because they taste like ass

        how do you prepare the veggies though? I imagine you won't just boil them.

        i followed some recipe that called for "marinating" everything (meat and vegetables and onions) in wine for 24 hours before before you actually start up the stew
        ended up with sour carrots and meat that was for some reason tough, even after 4 hours of cooking.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          marinating is unnecessary. people used to do that back then to preserve the meat because they didn't have fridges and the meat was real shit. I think you missed the part where you have to discard those marinated carrots and all the other vegetables. they're only aromatics for the sauce

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Marinating meat in something acidic can make the meat more tender or tone down unpleasant flavours like haut goût. The actual flavouring part isn't that strong in my experience as you braise it in the sauce anyways afterwards. That's probably the reason why many recipes ditch the step nowadays.
          Also sautéing marinated meats is a pain in the ass.
          You could also make a red wine sauce, add the bourguignonne garniture and serve it with a steak.

          You've never set foot in a kitchen, have you?

          What's your problem?

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Also not a fan of moussaka as it was just greasy sloppa. I don't see the purpose of bechamel for it or lasagne neither.

    For me it's fish fond based sauces. Made sauce bercy and normande but a sauce with such a fishy flavour isn't for me.
    Same for very vinegary sauces like sauce piquante, sauce poivrade or Sauerbraten.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    go to a restaurant where they make it really tasty the way you like it
    make notes and try again with their version as your model to aspire to

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you probably undersalted it. If it tastes meh just add more salt.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    nah the first time I made moussaka it was delicious
    think you're just a shit cook and/or you used a shitty recipe
    sorry

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hi Everyone,

    It's me OP. I take back what I said, it tastes way better today. I don't know what happened overnight in the fridge, but the day after all flavors work very well. Sometimes if you eat something right after cooking it all the flavors are out of focus, but now they are in focus and taste really good.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've never had moussaka that wasn't "meh". It's like biting down to a watery lasagna. Is it supposed to be actually good?

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Moussaka is one of my favorite dishes of all fucking time. you just suck at cooking it.

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