NO YAMS ARE NOT FRICKING SWEET POTATOES. Yams. >grown in Africa, totally different crop. Sweet Potatoes

NO YAMS ARE NOT FRICKING SWEET POTATOES

Yams
>grown in Africa, totally different crop

Sweet Potatoes
>consistently marketed as "yams" by moronic American food companies

Don't buy into the lie. You'd have to go to an international grocery store to even find yams in the states. What you see in your Kroger/Safeway/Publix, doesn't matter if it's near white or bright orange, it's a fricking sweet potato. Don't let me catch you making this mistake again. It won't be pretty for you.

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    this thread has emboldened me to continue referring to sweet potatoes as yams simply out of spite of OP who can't and won't do anything about it

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Neither of those are sweet potatoes

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >NO
    >YAMS
    >NO NO NO NO NNNNNO
    >NOOOOO YAAAAAAMS

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stay mad you dumb Black person

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      dont you dare think about getting more than 1 clam per ham

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    "yams" just used to be the american word for sweet potatoes. Because we had sweet potatoes but didn't have yams, but we had the word "yams" and knew it was something like a potato but different. Not really something that should upset you.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    marketed as "yams" by moronic American food companies
    The reason why sweet potatoes are called yams colloquially in America is because Enslaved Africans saw them as the closest analog in cooking to their own yams and referred to them as such. It's honestly impressive how much of southern American cuisine is just elevated slave food, those were some very industrious and creative cooks.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >It's honestly impressive how much of southern American cuisine is just elevated slave food, those were some very industrious and creative cooks.
      It would be if it were actually true.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >It would be if it were actually true
        I know this is bait, but it very evidently is true if you've ever had soul food or just southern US cuisine in general. Pork n beans, collard greens, etc.
        >Some slaves were maids and cooks. It's not like they were completely separated from society.
        Right, and the food they made ended up being a synthesized cuisine of American ingredients, English culinary tastes, and African cooking techniques. There's a clear distinction between the food they made for themselves (they often had to trap and fish after working the fields and were relegated to "garbage meats" like organ meat, raccoon, possum, etc) and the food they made for their masters.

        It's weird how often people parrot conflicting stories about this topic.
        >slaves were making do with scraps so now we have soul food like trotters and chitlins and grits and collard greens and
        >b-but they were also given whole animals to fry! a-and pecans and fruit and precious sugar to make pies! no those aren't european! stop bein raysis!
        A lot of the classics were made for the owners, and were adaptations of existing European recipes. Hence foods like the aforementioned pies, and techniques like deep fat frying and baking. It may have been a slave doing the cooking, but they didn't create those recipes, and they weren't eating those meals unless their owner was real nice.

        See my last statement. Things like cooking a little bit of meat with veggies would've been things slaves at themselves unless their masters were honest to god sadists. The westward passage you were getting fed porridge slop, but it doesn't do well to keep your work force completely malnourished, and slaves were often permitted a bit of the scrap cuts and to go bag their own game.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Middle passage, not westward. Forgive my typos I'm currently undergoing heat exhaustion in the godforsaken wastes of east texas.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >African cooking techniques
          Such as?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Using okra as a thickener in stews
            Having sauce as a side to a meat to be dipped rather than an application while cooking
            Deep fat frying (although this was also done by Euros, it's more the application of the technique to chickens)
            Using grated hominy to make grits (much less solid than African preparations of similar origin)
            Natives and slaves get equal credit for cooking on farming implements to make breads like cornpone

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      pretty much every impoverished demographic in history has been pretty creative with scarce ingredients except tribals who still just throw food directly into hot ashes or eat it raw. Slave cuisine was likely elevated by proximity to other cuisines as well. Some slaves were maids and cooks. It's not like they were completely separated from society.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's weird how often people parrot conflicting stories about this topic.
      >slaves were making do with scraps so now we have soul food like trotters and chitlins and grits and collard greens and
      >b-but they were also given whole animals to fry! a-and pecans and fruit and precious sugar to make pies! no those aren't european! stop bein raysis!
      A lot of the classics were made for the owners, and were adaptations of existing European recipes. Hence foods like the aforementioned pies, and techniques like deep fat frying and baking. It may have been a slave doing the cooking, but they didn't create those recipes, and they weren't eating those meals unless their owner was real nice.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        so true, we need to bring slavery back.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >see picture on left
    oh look, it's japanese sweet potatos

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >>see picture on left
      And I saw a boniato, a sweet yellow fleshed potato someone locally in florida eats.

      https://i.imgur.com/7QztqB3.png

      Neither of those are sweet potatoes

      similar to this, but more bark-like I think

      UF classifies it as a hybid, hrm. Anyway, it's delicious, only barely sweet.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Did the portogee barbarians bring the sweet potatoes to Nippon?

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sweer potato

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the yams got a hold of richard pyror

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Are Yams actually good? I have an arab grocer near me that sells them and I'm wondering.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    SHIBIDI-BOP SHIBIDI-WHOAHOHOOOO
    SING

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >sweet potato
    They're not potatoes.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah or like when dumb Americans call maize "corn".

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Culinaly is pretty much dead these days, but there's still nothing I hate more than threads like this, where OP comes in yelling at who the frick knows and acting all smug because they just learned something everyone here has known forever.

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