Peanut Oil - Neutral????????????

Something I thought I needed an answer to. They say that peanut oil is a neutral oil (it does not impart any flavor to the food, it is flavorless) but when you cook with peanut oil it smell and taste like PEANUT! How is that neutral?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    peanut oil is not neutral lmao who told you that?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes it is

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Every list of neutral oils i have looked at lists peanut oil as a neutral oil. Have heard many youtube men say that it is neutral. But it taste like peanut and smell like peanut, that doesn't seem neutral to me.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        congratulation, you made your own opinion based on your own observations!

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          But I would like for there to be some objectivity. Is it or is it not a neutral oil. I smell the peanut. I taste the peanut. If I cook with non virgin olive oil I don't taste it. If I cook with rapeseed oil I don't taste it. If I cook with canola I don't taste it. If I cook with avocado I don't taste it. These are what I have come to think of as neutral oils. But the peanut.... it has a smell/taste. How is that neutral?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Just let it go, brotendo. Peanut oil isn't worth losing your mind over.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Alright

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            How can you not taste the other oils?
            Do you have the COVID?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >If I cook with rapeseed oil I don't taste it. If I cook with canola I don't taste it
            rapeseed and canola are exactly the same fricking item, anon.
            anybody telling you different doesn't know the history of the term "canola oil".

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I smell the peanut. I taste the peanut.
            sounds like you disagree with the people who say it's neutral then? it's not so difficult. I agree with you btw, it definitely tastes of peanut. I rather like it for some uses for that reason.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've never had any heavy impartation of overtones.
      I like it for Deep frying, but tallow or LARD is much better.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        why the frick are you deep-frying pasta

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          why the frick arent you deep-frying pasta

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          digits
          LEL! Ah yes the old "Crinklecuttalini" side, best served with a sugared and vinegared tomato sauce.

          why the frick arent you deep-frying pasta

          checked!
          It's not that rare at all, just not with semolina pastas.
          Let me tell you a seceret:
          Ramen noodles are deep fried

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    imagine cooking with that shit wtf

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Even neutral oils have a smell and taste. You probably just identify peanut more because it has a more recognizable taste and smell. I can smell corn in corn oil. Soybean oil just smells kinda fishy to me. Canola oil has a taste to it that I'm guessing is obviously from the seed but I wouldn't really be able to identify that flavor as "canola".

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That taste you are trying to discern..
      Chemically scrubbed RANCID plant oil.
      Based olfactory-pilled tho-.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        you need to sharpen your mower blades.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, you aren't wrong--I'm using a mulching set tho-

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Accurate. I have gallon jugs of corn, soy and canola in the house right now (they were on sale all at the same price so I decided to get all three) and they absolutely do have distinctly different tastes and smells all their own but it doesn't impart much of either to the cooking.
      And what is up with soy in general being fishy? I started making homemade tofu with my missus' paneer stuff and even made from fresh, green soy beans (or frozen, which you can do, believe it or not), it always has the slightest fishiness to it.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >And what is up with soy in general being fishy?
        It seems like soy just contains similar compounds that are in fish and it becomes more noticeable when it's processed and starts to oxidize.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        tastelet

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You don't know what a tastelet is.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            it means your taste buds are like little baby
            wahhhh wahh can't taste flavor

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >it means your taste buds are like little baby
              >wahhhh wahh can't taste flavor
              No. A tastelet is a gourmand that likes to eat food that tastes good.
              Dumbass newbie

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                kek I believe you've been misled or maybe you're a brainlet too

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You don't know what a tastelet is.

              So how is

              Accurate. I have gallon jugs of corn, soy and canola in the house right now (they were on sale all at the same price so I decided to get all three) and they absolutely do have distinctly different tastes and smells all their own but it doesn't impart much of either to the cooking.
              And what is up with soy in general being fishy? I started making homemade tofu with my missus' paneer stuff and even made from fresh, green soy beans (or frozen, which you can do, believe it or not), it always has the slightest fishiness to it.

              a tastelet when he can taste the difference between these supposedly neutral oils? You are not very smart.

              So I, a person you will never identify, look stupid to you, a person I will never identify? Whatever will my mother say. You sound stupid to me. Stupid and autistic. The plant is named canola, the crop is canola, it is a type of rapeseed and has seeds that can be used to grow canola. It does not provide enough oil without chemical processing to make economic sense, a detail which I shouldn't have to specify. Thanks for admitting to being an industry shill, though.

              That's nice, ma'am, but you claimed that mechanical processing for canola oil is impossible (it's not) and now admitted to that fact by moving your goalposts, claiming that while it's possible, it's not financially prudent to not use chemical solvents (wrong again, since cold pressed canola oil without solvent extraction exists).
              Finally, admitting that canola is a type of rapeseed, like i'd said in the first place, is neither a refutation of any points I made nor the sick burn you seem to imagine it is.
              I didn't think it possible, but you've made yourself look even dumber than before. Good job?

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    depends on your taste sensitivities. i prefer cooking with vegetable oil, but theres a swathe of different oils you can try to find something that you like.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You’re using old rancid peanut oil. Get a better brand.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's pretty much neutral yeah. A lot more than you'd think, if peanut butter was a part of your diet.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You're right, they're wrong. Now throw some fricking peanut oil in a skillet, fry up a couple hotdogs, crack a beer and enjoy.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use Picky Picky brand peanut oil and it has no peanut flavour or scent.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure it's a seed oil. Everyone on this board must have gallons worth of diarrhea daily.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It isn't. Look at a jar of natural peanut butter. The oil separates by simple mechanical means. The canola seed won't give up its oil without chemical processing.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The canola seed
        There is no canola seed. It's just rapeseed with low erucic acid (CANadian Oil, Low Acid; CAN O L A).
        >won't give up its oil without chemical processing.
        0 for 2. You can cold press any seed for oil. Chemically extracted oil is to get every last bit of the stuff out of the seeds, like how oil floats on water, yeah? In chemically expected oil, a chemical solvent forces the remaining oil out in a similar manner.
        The fact is, any oil can be chemically extracted, including olive and coconut (unless specifically labeled virgin) just as any oil can be mechanically extracted, too.
        Don't speak if you don't know wtf you're talking about. It makes you look stupid.
        t. guy who has actually extracted seed oils himself

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          So I, a person you will never identify, look stupid to you, a person I will never identify? Whatever will my mother say. You sound stupid to me. Stupid and autistic. The plant is named canola, the crop is canola, it is a type of rapeseed and has seeds that can be used to grow canola. It does not provide enough oil without chemical processing to make economic sense, a detail which I shouldn't have to specify. Thanks for admitting to being an industry shill, though.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            you sound like an industry sock puppet designed to make that other guy sound smarter

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >You sound stupid to me. Stupid and autistic.
            Not the guy you're talking to, but considering your entire original post boiled down to
            >mechanical is natural and good
            >chemical is forced and bad
            i'd say you're stupid.

            >Thanks for admitting to being an industry shill, though.
            The gig is up... Big Seed Oil has been found-out on Culinaly.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >The gig is up... Big Seed Oil has been found-out on Culinaly.
              Crisco is like a vegan form of lard/tallow/schmaltz, and you can use it as a replacement for animal fats if you don't like the idea of hurting innocent, cute animals.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I only hurt guilty, ugly animals. Good thing

                So I, a person you will never identify, look stupid to you, a person I will never identify? Whatever will my mother say. You sound stupid to me. Stupid and autistic. The plant is named canola, the crop is canola, it is a type of rapeseed and has seeds that can be used to grow canola. It does not provide enough oil without chemical processing to make economic sense, a detail which I shouldn't have to specify. Thanks for admitting to being an industry shill, though.

                sinfully hideous mother is into S&M.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I can definitely smell peanut oil when im cooking but it doesn't carry over into the finished meal's aroma or taste

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    peanuts are seeds, therefore it's a seed oil, and seed oils are bad.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      ok schizo

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >anons admitting to cooking with seed oils and soy based products
    >cat gifs
    wait till the sharty hears about this reddit tier thread

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    if you eat sneed oil you will die

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yall talking about the peanut oil?

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There's a reason it's more expensive than canola and vegetable oil

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I cant afford it

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Are the people spamming about oils being unhealthy with zero proof here because of Qanon
    Sorry but your life isn't going to magically get better by not eating seed oils, not matter how much they're processed in a factory. You see magic doesn't exist and factories dont imbibe bad vibes into the products that go through them

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I don't think seed oils are inherently bad but I don't see why they would be completely exempt from the general rule that highly processed food is less healthy.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >highly processed food is less healthy.
        it usually relates to overeating carbs, white rice, paste, chips, and simply getting massive overload of carbs because they taste great. Then you might get inflammation from eating specific food item and thats its own issue. Then since you got tasty food available 24/7 you dont give your body time to rest, the inflammation causes more issues and you fat.
        People often mix in stuff like you dont get enough vitamins or micronutrients but its actually irrelevant because of how easy it is to acquire them. Cavemen survived without ever googling how many vitamins they need each day after all.

        The seed oil conspiracy is a natural = good fallacy. Like some youtuber posted a picture of a factory as key argument as for why you should avoid them. Thats where the argument begins and ends

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >The seed oil conspiracy is a natural = good fallacy. Like some youtuber posted a picture of a factory as key argument as for why you should avoid them. Thats where the argument begins and ends
          Not quite. See

          The fear is of solvent extracted oil, which most seed oils are. The reason for this fear is because the solvent used is hexane, which is incorrectly said to be gasoline (hexane is used as a solvent in gasoline production, too, and gasoline is only 3% hexane at most).
          I don't know how much hexane is in chemically processed seed oil exactly, but it's considerably less than 3%. Every paper and article I've read on the subject to mention quantities simply says "trace amounts." However, hexane isn't safe to consume in any amount, really, but seed oils extracted with it are given Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) status by the US FDA and equivalent status elsewhere.
          I would say the concern is not unfounded and not without merit but very very very likely not actually taken seriously by most of the dumb c**ts posting about it here. They're too fat, lazy, friendless, ugly and stupid to cook for themselves and are therefore almost certainly eating mass-produced food that undoubtedly contains chemically extracted seed oils.
          I say, avoid it when you can but don't let it get to the point where this aversion becomes your personality. The easiest way to avoid chemically extracted seed oils are to buy virgin oils or use animal-derived cooking fats. You can do as I did and try making your own seed oils (I'm [...]). Be careful, tho, since you're likely unable to extract the oils without heating them up in the process, making them more likely to go off quickly. Refrigeration can help prolong shelf life but it still won't be nearly as shelf stable as chemically extracted (years) or even cold-pressed oils (months) are. Still, it's nice to do once just to get a better understanding of how this shit works.

          There is some legitimate concern, but total aversion to this omnipresent foodstuff is extremely taxing in the modern world so like I said already, avoid it when you can but don't go crazy over it.
          And for frick's sake, didn't be that funny at the barbecue asking if the mayonnaise was made with seed oil. You already know it was. Don't use that as a segue to being a c**t and soapboxing about the evils of seed oil. Nobody cares and I want my fricking coleslaw

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The fear is of solvent extracted oil, which most seed oils are. The reason for this fear is because the solvent used is hexane, which is incorrectly said to be gasoline (hexane is used as a solvent in gasoline production, too, and gasoline is only 3% hexane at most).
      I don't know how much hexane is in chemically processed seed oil exactly, but it's considerably less than 3%. Every paper and article I've read on the subject to mention quantities simply says "trace amounts." However, hexane isn't safe to consume in any amount, really, but seed oils extracted with it are given Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) status by the US FDA and equivalent status elsewhere.
      I would say the concern is not unfounded and not without merit but very very very likely not actually taken seriously by most of the dumb c**ts posting about it here. They're too fat, lazy, friendless, ugly and stupid to cook for themselves and are therefore almost certainly eating mass-produced food that undoubtedly contains chemically extracted seed oils.
      I say, avoid it when you can but don't let it get to the point where this aversion becomes your personality. The easiest way to avoid chemically extracted seed oils are to buy virgin oils or use animal-derived cooking fats. You can do as I did and try making your own seed oils (I'm

      >The canola seed
      There is no canola seed. It's just rapeseed with low erucic acid (CANadian Oil, Low Acid; CAN O L A).
      >won't give up its oil without chemical processing.
      0 for 2. You can cold press any seed for oil. Chemically extracted oil is to get every last bit of the stuff out of the seeds, like how oil floats on water, yeah? In chemically expected oil, a chemical solvent forces the remaining oil out in a similar manner.
      The fact is, any oil can be chemically extracted, including olive and coconut (unless specifically labeled virgin) just as any oil can be mechanically extracted, too.
      Don't speak if you don't know wtf you're talking about. It makes you look stupid.
      t. guy who has actually extracted seed oils himself

      ). Be careful, tho, since you're likely unable to extract the oils without heating them up in the process, making them more likely to go off quickly. Refrigeration can help prolong shelf life but it still won't be nearly as shelf stable as chemically extracted (years) or even cold-pressed oils (months) are. Still, it's nice to do once just to get a better understanding of how this shit works.

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It is neutral. The others are not.

    Try cooking with different oils now and then.

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