Rabbit Farming

Has farming rabbits for meat ever been common? I've had rabbit once before. It's basically chicken but leaner. I'm thinking about European food culture though and I dontbthink I've ever personally heard anything about them being a commonly eaten food. This seems strange to me, since at least where I live, in a part of the US with a similar climate to Europe, they are everywhere, although if memory serves me, the Cottontail is a rabbit from America only.

Are they poor as far as cost goes? I live in the suburbs where raising chickens is a no-go. Rabbits too, but im thinking about how I could farm them discreetly without being cruel to them. They aren't noisy or stinky, and I don't have a problem, in the abstract at least, with slaughtering them, though I have never taken the life of a thing with warm blood.

I don't think stacked cages is good enough of a quality of life for my rabbits. Would using vertical space replicate their natural burrowing? Maybe if I had them on a shelf with a tunnel to the ground? Or I guess I could just let them run around wherever they want and clean every day......... RIP all my wires though.......

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Antarctic explorers brought rabbits to farm and they ended up starving because the meat was too lean. You're better off eating dog.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't think anyone is interested in breeding rabbits to survive off of them. More like they want a cheap meat they can raise in secret as a luxury for when Soros halts the sale of meat worldwide and forces us to eat wienerroaches.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You'll only starve from rabbit if you don't eat anything fattier. Rabbit meat is incredible high in protein compared to fath though, and this does cause problems.

      Thats a huge rabbit. Also Guinea pig tastes better because they are fat

      Ooh, I might have to look into that. What are guinea pigs anyway? Rodents?

      rabbit is happy in a cage, the tunnels in a rabbit den is so they can escape/avoid predators. they dont enjoy that aspect of their burrows. Give a rabbit food, water, and shelter and they are in paradise. They dont have a desire to explore, they dont need to roam. Some people add 5 gallon buckets to the cage to stimulate an extra level and thats important for breeding and seperating the animals. Some people farm rabbits for their pelts, some breeds you can directly harvest excess fur without hurting them. But their meat is fine and can be interchanged in recipes that use chicken

      pre-industrial societies didnt farm rabbits because you cant without access to cheap metal cages. 'free'range rabbits means dead rabbits. They are a r-selected prey species that are extremely fragile by nature. You let rabbits out in your yard, or farm, or whatever and they will either accidently escape and get lost and then die to disease/starvation or be eaten by predators.

      Why wouldn't they just farm them in a coop like chickens?

      I was reading into stuff about homesteading, apparently rabbit is more efficient than chicken when it comes to grain to meat yield. This one family though, was a video of them explaining how they live off of meat rabbits exclusively. All of them had this kind of rodent-y prey animal look in their faces, especially the dad. idk maybe thats the drawback.

      If you feed it your own grass and veg instead of pellets, they are even cheaper. I was planning on something like that, and only using fake food if necessary.

      You shouldn't eat rabbit meat because you can actually starve to death from it

      I eat a lot of beef. I'll get enough fat.
      If it's really a fear, you can just add some fat via oil, cheese, or butter.

      I used to go to a primary industries expo and there was a rabbit farmer that would give out samples, was pretty small scale though and i didn't ask about his farm but they exist.
      They're abundant, easy enough to hunt and not that desirable so no-one bothers is my guess.
      Just go hunting instead, you said yourself they're everywhere.

      I try to chase the rabbits in my backyard but they are notoriously fast.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Thats a huge rabbit. Also Guinea pig tastes better because they are fat

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That rabbit is average size for its breed. Opinion discarded.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They're too adorable to eat, Anon.

      They're cheap to raise and pretty easy also, but too cute!

      That's a pretty mid bun. Flemish giants are the big ones and that ain't a Flemish.

      Antarctic explorers brought rabbits to farm and they ended up starving because the meat was too lean. You're better off eating dog.

      A dog is a fine meal, and great in bed too. #knotclub #knots4ever #lovetheknot

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    rabbit is happy in a cage, the tunnels in a rabbit den is so they can escape/avoid predators. they dont enjoy that aspect of their burrows. Give a rabbit food, water, and shelter and they are in paradise. They dont have a desire to explore, they dont need to roam. Some people add 5 gallon buckets to the cage to stimulate an extra level and thats important for breeding and seperating the animals. Some people farm rabbits for their pelts, some breeds you can directly harvest excess fur without hurting them. But their meat is fine and can be interchanged in recipes that use chicken

    pre-industrial societies didnt farm rabbits because you cant without access to cheap metal cages. 'free'range rabbits means dead rabbits. They are a r-selected prey species that are extremely fragile by nature. You let rabbits out in your yard, or farm, or whatever and they will either accidently escape and get lost and then die to disease/starvation or be eaten by predators.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I was reading into stuff about homesteading, apparently rabbit is more efficient than chicken when it comes to grain to meat yield. This one family though, was a video of them explaining how they live off of meat rabbits exclusively. All of them had this kind of rodent-y prey animal look in their faces, especially the dad. idk maybe thats the drawback.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      but rabbit can't shat out eggs

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Meat chickens aren't raised for their eggs anon.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        have you heard about easter bunnys?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://bahs.org.uk/AGHR/ARTICLES/36n1a1.pdf

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You shouldn't eat rabbit meat because you can actually starve to death from it

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I used to go to a primary industries expo and there was a rabbit farmer that would give out samples, was pretty small scale though and i didn't ask about his farm but they exist.
    They're abundant, easy enough to hunt and not that desirable so no-one bothers is my guess.
    Just go hunting instead, you said yourself they're everywhere.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    there was once a butcher shop in mt horeb, wisconsin where screaming rabbits could be heard from outside all fricking day through the concrete walls. i think he was a sadist

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm impressed that someone else in the world has heard of Mt Horeb.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm sure some moron culture farmed rabbits at some point, but rabbits are survival food. eaten because they're easy to shoot. can't outrun a bullet, el-ahrairah

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Rabbits are full of razor sharp bones and the amount of meat for the amount of work is stone age, there's a reason rabbit, like mead, fell out of favor except among the renfaire larper crowd

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You bring up a good point, but unless you're harvesting the honey yourself, mead making is mostly waiting. I've been watching this normal dude making mead and its like 3 ingredients in a special bottle.
      https://youtube.com/shorts/gaXG9nAF9CE?si=jhVz1PIEEZeE5YyW

      I should probably try butchering one before I do anything too bold with them like getting many.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Honey is expensive compared to grape juice for making wine. I don't think it's really for any other reason.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein_poisoning

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    we raise and eat rabbits regularly.

    we keep aboot 15 on hand. that covers our need for meat, and breeding.

    I've posted on here a few times aboot our various dishes. it really good meat. it is extremely versatile, has a great texture and the flavor seems to meld with and/or compliment most everything.

    wife does it all. from feeding, care, breeding, slaughter, butcher and cooking.

    it is not our only meat. we also have lamb, hogget, mutton, turkeys, quail, chickens guinea and occasional hog.

    I highly reccomend it. grow your own. turn away from the industrial food system.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Really cool. Have you been selling your meat?

      https://i.imgur.com/mlrqWMJ.jpg

      Rabbits having a big revival in the grow your own food spaces.
      They're cheaper to raise then chickens on a small scale. They don't handle industrial abuse quite as well as chickens so they didnt win out on the factory farming systems.

      Ive raise rabbits for practically free during the summer months. Just supplemental pellets. The manure alone pays for the cost of that.
      They also butcher much easier than birds.

      They usually just eat grass and then shit it out and then eat the shit, don't they?

      There was only a small time window where it really made sense around the 1930s to 1950s in the depression and postwar homesteads.
      First main thing is technology, someone already mentioned cage and pen tech, the other major invention is pelletized feeding. Pellets are really important to get nutrition consistently, and they weren't around until the 30s.
      Rabbit populations are also susceptible to collapsing from disease, it's like you have an exponential increase and everything seems fine and then a likewise exponential decrease. Myxomatosis for example killed practically all rabbits in Britain in the 50s.
      Rabbits are also relatively high effort to butcher, but you do get a usable pelt from some breeds. Rabbits also purposely hide disease and sickness so it takes a careful eye to casually check for health outside of a medical exam.
      Because of the other problems there hasn't been as advanced breeding for meat rabbits as say the chicken.

      All of these really prevent large scale commercial rabbit farms. Small scale is not quite as impacted by the issues but that prevents widespread rabbiting.

      Overall the looming question is why would you pick rabbit over chicken? Chickens just win.

      Noise and smell.
      Other reasons I've heard are that the manure is useful, dry, and odorless, and that people don't like plucking chickens.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Rabbits having a big revival in the grow your own food spaces.
    They're cheaper to raise then chickens on a small scale. They don't handle industrial abuse quite as well as chickens so they didnt win out on the factory farming systems.

    Ive raise rabbits for practically free during the summer months. Just supplemental pellets. The manure alone pays for the cost of that.
    They also butcher much easier than birds.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There was only a small time window where it really made sense around the 1930s to 1950s in the depression and postwar homesteads.
    First main thing is technology, someone already mentioned cage and pen tech, the other major invention is pelletized feeding. Pellets are really important to get nutrition consistently, and they weren't around until the 30s.
    Rabbit populations are also susceptible to collapsing from disease, it's like you have an exponential increase and everything seems fine and then a likewise exponential decrease. Myxomatosis for example killed practically all rabbits in Britain in the 50s.
    Rabbits are also relatively high effort to butcher, but you do get a usable pelt from some breeds. Rabbits also purposely hide disease and sickness so it takes a careful eye to casually check for health outside of a medical exam.
    Because of the other problems there hasn't been as advanced breeding for meat rabbits as say the chicken.

    All of these really prevent large scale commercial rabbit farms. Small scale is not quite as impacted by the issues but that prevents widespread rabbiting.

    Overall the looming question is why would you pick rabbit over chicken? Chickens just win.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I'm thinking about European food culture though and I dontbthink I've ever personally heard anything about them being a commonly eaten food.

    My grandma raised rabbits to eat when she was dirt-poor living on the Azores.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    OP here again. Are any peemaculture gays rabbitpilled? I'm just thinking about how the rabbits in my backyard lived, and how if I could just confine them somehow, I'd have a farm. They tunnel though.
    Just "thinking out loud, but what if a concrete floor, like a concrete foundation, was used on an area of yard to prevent them from digging, was fenced off, and an artificial burrow was made. Maybe with like a hole in the concrete leading to a garbage can or something. I'm thinking of how to replicate regular life and comfort for them. It would be cool for them to have some space to run around in and to not feel threatened or trapped often.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      we keep ours in a "free range" Warren.

      we have a giant multi section aviary. really just a fancy way to say chicken coop. we have areas for our ducks, turkeys, quail, 3 breeds of chickens seperate, and then we build an area for our rabbit Warren, attached to all that.

      we feed pellets, but the bulk of their diet is alfalfa, oat and timothy hay.

      we used to keep our rabbits in individual cages, but since we have many acres now. it just makes more sense to let them live in a colony as nature would. less hassle.

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