Recipes always say to add the onion to the pan first, but this just gives you soggy, overcooked onions.

Recipes always say to add the onion to the pan first, but this just gives you soggy, overcooked onions.
I add onion at the end and cook it for no more than 30 seconds so it doesn't lose its firm texture. This is especially necessary for stir-fry.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    they say that so the onion flavor can spread throughout the dish rather than just being confined to the onions themselves

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Might as well use onion powder then

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        onion powder isn't as potent as the real thing
        same thing for garlic powder

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        ngmi

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        When to add any ingredient depends on what you want that ingredient to do, friend.
        I add thinly sliced onion at the beginning when I need it caramelised as a base for something to be built upon. I add larger cut chunks of onion in the middle of cooking or nearer the end when I want the onion to play the role of a soup, stew or stir fry vegetable.

        Different taste. Like using fresh vs picked vs powdered ginger; all the taste different and are used differently in different things for different reasons.

        onion powder isn't as potent as the real thing
        same thing for garlic powder

        It's not about potency, it's about overall taste. I seldom use onion powder but when I do, I powder it from dried bits of onion for a more potent overall flavour than shopbought powder but that flavour isn't even remotely similar to that of fresh onion. I don't use dried garlic or garlic powder at all.

        >well yeah the whole point of a stir fry is to cook everything quickly on high heat.
        You'd still want to add onion at the end, not at the beginning like recipes say

        That's not quite right. It's considered a tender vegetable so it goes nearer the middle of the stir fry asking with other tender vegetables like bell peppers. Leafy vegetables go at the end.

        here listen I'm hijacking these shitpost thread
        To what extent should olives be cooked? Like if I have my jar of olives, take them out, chop them. Do I add them to the pan at the start with the onions or do I add them to the pan at the end with the garlic?

        Same as what I've been saying about onion: depends on what you want the olives to do.

        https://i.imgur.com/T4m9LIl.jpeg

        Ghastly.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/PiGu4u5.jpeg

        Recipes always say to add the onion to the pan first, but this just gives you soggy, overcooked onions.
        I add onion at the end and cook it for no more than 30 seconds so it doesn't lose its firm texture. This is especially necessary for stir-fry.

        moron, you finely dice an onion to add at the beginning so it imparts as much flavour as it can, and you chop up some chunky onion to add at the end to get chunky, crunchy pieces of onion.
        It's called getting the best of both worlds.

        Surely you can afford an extra onion.
        Christ, if you wanna buy onion powder you can probably afford multiple extra onions for the same price. Onions are cheap as frick.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Your preference should be everybody else's preference. Got it, champ.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >This is especially necessary for stir-fry.
    well yeah the whole point of a stir fry is to cook everything quickly on high heat. good job figuring that one out. for other dishes, you might not necessarily want that firm texture, but for the onion to be in the background. there's a time and place for both.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >well yeah the whole point of a stir fry is to cook everything quickly on high heat.
      You'd still want to add onion at the end, not at the beginning like recipes say

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        no

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >and I took that butchery knife and held it up to her neck
    >and I said if you want to LIVE to see tomorrow, you better start cooking them onions a little bit better than what you been--
    >I'm TIRED of sloppy, slimy onions

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    here listen I'm hijacking these shitpost thread
    To what extent should olives be cooked? Like if I have my jar of olives, take them out, chop them. Do I add them to the pan at the start with the onions or do I add them to the pan at the end with the garlic?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I feel that cooking olives, pickles, kapers etc. completely ruins them.
      I add them as a garnish just before serving.
      Guess you can use some of the brine in your dish depending on what you're making.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >brine
        What if they're oil cured IE they've no brine? Those are best added at the beginning.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I'd still only add the liquid and use the actual preserved vegetable as a garnish.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I'd still only add the liquid and use the actual preserved vegetable as a garnish.

          Forgot to add; pretty much only oil preserved thing I get is whole cloves of garlic. I'd rather cook with fresh ones and put the oily ones in a salad or something.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >oil preserved thing
            Oil-cured != Oil preserved, I don't think. I could be wrong, but I don't think that's the case since oil cured olives aren't actually packed in oil.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Add them at the end.
      If you want to add an olive flavour to cook into the meal, add some of the olive brine where the recipe would call for olives.
      Then add your olives at the end so they're superior.

      Olive brine is fricking fantastic as an ingredient and people just throw that shit away.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For me, it's when the onions have been cooked enough to be softer and sweeter but still retain a slight crisp.

  7. 1 month ago
    all fields

    frick you Black person

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    good for you.

    no one cares.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    nothing cringier than an american's opinions on cookery

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You'd be eating nothing but pretzels and sauerkraut if it wasn't for Americans

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        god i wish

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I will not tolerate your existence in my society

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >but this just gives you
    >you
    stop projecting.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Recently I've been cooking onions in their skins in the airfryer. Fricking delicious.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Your french onion soup must be terrible

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Most ppl want them "overcooked and soggy". I honestly dont know any ppl irl who boast ruining every dish with raw onions, but you do you

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That just depends entirely on what you're making. Here's a protip for chili btw - You can add onions in the beginning and then again in the end for texture

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i like my onions raw and wriggling

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