*screeeech* *BAM* *BAM* *scraaaatch**

And at super high temperature too.
Wouldn't that dangerous? All the metal scratching and Chinese steel coating go straight into your fried rice.
Am I paranoid?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If there ever was any coating it is long gone. Who cares about some additional iron?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what the frick are you talking about butthole

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sure, if you're hacking at the topside hard enough to get metal shavings then maybe it's time to calm down.
    Otherwise it's fine. It's only the side touching the food you care about. Only nonsticks have coating. I don't like the sound of scraping metal so I pick up the pan to toss.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You aren't going to digest steel and even if you could it's just carbon and iron.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >just burn off the coating in advance bro

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Any carbon steel cookware that isn't pre-seasoned will ship from the factory with a beeswax, mineral oil or lacquer coating to protect the metal from rusting in transit. Lacquer is more common with woks, for some reason, and it takes a lot of heat to fully burn it off. It amazes me that this guy was able to do it in under 2 minutes. With my most powerful gas stove (Iwatani butane cartridge stove), and working together with a kitchen blowtorch, it took me almost an hour to get the lacquer off of my Yamada wok, and to also blue the metal. Most people will struggle to burn it all off in one go with a residential gas stove.

        isn't this basically the process called blueing?

        It's not the same as gun bluing, but when you get carbon steel really hot, it turns blue like that. I think it's basically like a thin layer of forge scale.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Those wok ranges are insane, like six figure BTU on full blast. Found a newer video by the same guy with no cuts, but it still only takes him a few minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNhtIeSYGNc

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      isn't this basically the process called blueing?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i honestly dont get wtf he he doing but the process is not blueing of any kind
        the blue sheen is from the steel being in the 300°c range

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i honestly dont get wtf he he doing but the process is not blueing of any kind
        the blue sheen is from the steel being in the 300°c range

        It is heat bluing, but the reaction coating is too thin to provide much rust resistance like often claimed, so it's usually only done for cosmetic reasons (watches, car exhausts, knives) which for a pan is dumb, it just looks darker faster when seasoning. I'll assume

        Any carbon steel cookware that isn't pre-seasoned will ship from the factory with a beeswax, mineral oil or lacquer coating to protect the metal from rusting in transit. Lacquer is more common with woks, for some reason, and it takes a lot of heat to fully burn it off. It amazes me that this guy was able to do it in under 2 minutes. With my most powerful gas stove (Iwatani butane cartridge stove), and working together with a kitchen blowtorch, it took me almost an hour to get the lacquer off of my Yamada wok, and to also blue the metal. Most people will struggle to burn it all off in one go with a residential gas stove.

        [...]
        It's not the same as gun bluing, but when you get carbon steel really hot, it turns blue like that. I think it's basically like a thin layer of forge scale.

        is right regarding other coatings.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          are you making shit up or do mutts really call tempering colors bluing too?
          A language that uses one word for half a dozen different processes with entire different chemistry is really something

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      He said stainless, so there's also chromium, probably nickel, and a range of additional possibilities.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No one other than you said stainless.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You’re supposed to wash and then season your wok before the first use.
    After that there shouldn’t be any problem unless you are doing something wrong.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Don't you mean something wong?

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >steel coating
    Those are just carbon steel. As in carbon and iron and not much else. Any harmful contaminants chinks could add like chromium would actually be more expensive that pure steel.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004HGBYTY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

    I put in oven on "CLEAN" to get rid of factory anti-rust.

    Neat wok, semi flat but still rounded bottom for better shuffle toss food flipping action but still stays upright if loaded.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    try and scratch steel with steel. unless you are using carbide or something you will only make marks, shavings or flakes wont come off

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Steel can't shave steel, you need strong abrasives for that, scratches are just deformations in the material that will oxidize with time. But don't worry, fried rice already contains more heavy metals than any wok coating might add.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >steel coating

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >steel coating
    are you moronic

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Trace amounts of iron in food is not going to hurt you. Your body needs some iron for basic functioning.

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