So what does the word "pudding" actually mean?

So what does the word "pudding" actually mean?

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

Ape Out Shirt $21.68

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

  1. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    Those baby talking island bound fricks don't even know what they mean half the time.

  2. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    It means dessert in England, like how "tea" means supper

    • 5 days ago
      Anonymous

      So explain blood pudding/black pudding

      • 5 days ago
        Anonymous

        pudding literally means small sausage.

        like mincemeat, it was common to serve sweetened sausages and as dessert became more common in the lower classes they slowly dropped the meat from the pudding.
        this is because britons are drunk and stupid, inventing new words to describe something is a cultural even that hasn't happened for them since Shakespeare.

        • 5 days ago
          Anonymous

          your dick literally means small sausage

      • 5 days ago
        Anonymous

        Your image reminds me so much of a dream I had..

        desserts in england can be savoury, eaten alongside a main course. the term pretty much means "side dish"

        • 5 days ago
          Anonymous

          this. to be more precise it refers to foods that are homogeneous in consistency.
          You wouldn't call a side of onion rings a pudding for example.
          The name of the popular dish "bread pudding" is kind of redundant lol

  3. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    >puddin' on the ritz

    • 5 days ago
      Anonymous

      You won the internet for today

  4. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    Pudding initially meant something cooked by steaming or boiling after being stuffed into a casing, so the earliest puddings were types of sausage, and can be either sweet or savory. It still applies today, just the casing is optional.

    Fun fact, the term pudding was also medieval slang for a person's innards, especially the contents of their stomach, after they had been cut open during battle. Edgelords never change

  5. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    These days pudding means dessert, but it has kept its historical usage in a few cases (black pudding, Yorkshire pudding).

    I know this is hard to understand for Americans who come from a country with no history.

  6. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    its means stubbyboi

  7. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    You can just look this shit up you know.

    • 5 days ago
      Anonymous

      Wait wtf we're using words from fricking foreigners? I thought the English invented English.

      • 5 days ago
        Anonymous

        You thought wrong, the English appropriate other culture's shit and make it our own.

        • 5 days ago
          Anonymous

          I read on kotaku that the english bulldoze their own culture to make room for that of the pajeets and muzzies
          Is that what you mean?

          • 5 days ago
            Anonymous

            Nope.

          • 5 days ago
            Anonymous

            No Germans, Norwegians, Danes and the French went over to their island to bully them. Every time they came over they forced the British to adopt some of their language. This went on for a long time, and now English is a mix of all those languages.

  8. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    BEHOLD PEASANTS

  9. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    This image should be flipped, the original definition of "pudding" was a meat based dish cooked in either animal organs or a cloth bag. Later, sweeter puddings became more popular than savory ones, until eventually it became a general term for dessert. Finally, the custard based pudding in the top image became so popular (and alternative terms for dessert became more popular as well) it took the formerly general term back to the specific, but for something completely different than the original use.

    • 5 days ago
      Anonymous

      >Finally, the custard based pudding in the top image became so popular (and alternative terms for dessert became more popular as well) it took the formerly general term back to the specific
      No it didn't, you're American is showing.
      Not one person in the UK calls that "pudding" it's either mousse or custard, which is what the American "pudding" essentially is.

      • 5 days ago
        Anonymous

        This is an American website, yes. Also having been to the UK, yes people do sometimes refer to custard as "pudding", because as I said it is a general term for dessert there.

  10. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    The words been around for like 600 years, its allowed to mean more than one thing

  11. 5 days ago
    Anonymous

    Bread pudding is delicious.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *