*taste like nothing compared to 50 years ago*. are the boomers right?

*taste like nothing compared to 50 years ago*
are the boomers right?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Closer to 100. Boomers are just morons parroting their parents.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Fpbp, the green revolution and it's consequences have been terrible for nutritional values

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's chill dude, just spend hundreds of dollars a year on supplements and choke down a handful of capsules each day to replace what the Earth can no longer provide us due to our rape of her, we don't live in a dystopia yet.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And how do you know this?
      Are you 100+ years old or are you just redditing out some bullshit?

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe the Georgia Guidestones were right? That Humanity's arrogant pillaging of the Earth's resources is simply unsustainable and will cause them to suffer?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Name me one creature that does not pillage arrogantly. Humans just do pillaging better so they get poopooed.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >are the boomers right?
    mostly, but not for the reason you think. 50 years ago all of those vegetables and fruits were only available seasonally, so when you got them it had been 10 months or so since you'd had them last, so that month of banana season was special. The only equivalent I can think of today is crawfish season, you can get frozen crawfish year round but in March and April you can get fresh boiled crawfish that are out of this world - and a significant part of that is the many months when you are without. Food used to be like that for nearly everything, you had corn season and bean season and strawberry season and blueberry season, everything except beef, pork, and chicken were seasonal.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      most produce is picked when its unriped then artifically ripened with ethylene gas, which makes the plant look ready to eat but taste nothing like a propperly sun ripened fruit or vegetables.

      things have gotten worse post-covid/ukraine war because it use to be, super markets would only get the highest quality produce (in the first world) but now they intentionally sell you stuff that would normally be fed to livestock as slop. its way common to find rotten produce at stores now a days, and these same low quality foods make it into the processed food as well when in the past, they would be thrown away, fed to livestock, or ground into fertilizer.

      this too. now you can get produce picked half a world away, stored in various ways, then given to you at a much later time then would normally be consumed. Each storage method has a slight effect on taste. I believe some apples are even stored for a year+ old before they reach the consumer. They get stored in low oxygen environments for months which dramatically slows down their aging.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      most produce is picked when its unriped then artifically ripened with ethylene gas, which makes the plant look ready to eat but taste nothing like a propperly sun ripened fruit or vegetables.

      things have gotten worse post-covid/ukraine war because it use to be, super markets would only get the highest quality produce (in the first world) but now they intentionally sell you stuff that would normally be fed to livestock as slop. its way common to find rotten produce at stores now a days, and these same low quality foods make it into the processed food as well when in the past, they would be thrown away, fed to livestock, or ground into fertilizer.

      this too. now you can get produce picked half a world away, stored in various ways, then given to you at a much later time then would normally be consumed. Each storage method has a slight effect on taste. I believe some apples are even stored for a year+ old before they reach the consumer. They get stored in low oxygen environments for months which dramatically slows down their aging.

      These 2 poasts sum it up very tidily.
      In addition, there has been widespread soil depletion as well as massive varietal constriction due to 90% of the food supply being in the hands of globalist companies.
      The problem with overpopulation has never been one of space--the entire world population can fit into the state of Florida. It's always been an issue of resources and waste.
      There are some good companies trying to combat that though. The cotton candy grapes may be kind of a meme, but the company behind them is one of the good ones as far as I've been able to dig.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Wanna try those weird, long ones

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, they look very interesting, and I wonder what the seeds are like.
          I couldn't find any within 400 miles of my location for sale, and they may not be worth it to pay for shipping of them.
          If you don't mid waiting a few years, you might consider growing your own.
          Apparently it takes~2 months for the seeds to germinate and ~3-4 years to get fruit, but if you do get a good outcome,it may be worth it.
          >pic

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            honestly i wouldnt buy seeds off amazon, ive had nothing but bad experiences with it. Find a local organic farm in your area and purchase seeds from them.

            >muh organic meme

            i say local more so than organic because it means those seeds are already aclimatized for your own local area, which is a bigger deal than most people think. You should also try and save your own seeds instead of habitually buying newones each year for the same reason. As your plants grow in a new environment, it slightly changes their dna and makes them more likely to succeed in each subquential year if you keep growing them in the same place.

            That would require looking around in smaller farms for decent seeds, doesn't it?
            I think I might pick up gardening in future, the soil depletion is going to frick us over soon.

            >I think I might pick up gardening in future, the soil depletion is going to frick us over soon.

            its already fricked us over. lots of ferilizer precursor chemicals were made in and around ukraine, which is part of the reason food prices have spiked so much. The globalist supply chain system only functions propperly when theres world peace. Most industrial agg relies on petro-chemical fertilizers which unironically salt the land, forcing you to use more and more over time. One thing permaculture chads do right is focus on sustainable soil development, but thats more or less just returning to trvdition. A tradition intentionally suppressed to sell fertilizers.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >lots of ferilizer precursor chemicals were made in and around ukraine
              How come such important stuff doesn't have any redundancy system and it's made in some shithole on top of that?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                so the israeli zionist globalists can hold the rest of the world hostage under the threat of manufactured global famines

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >How come such important stuff doesn't have any redundancy
                It does. It just ends up costing more.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >i say local more so than organic because it means those seeds are already aclimatized for your own local area, which is a bigger deal than most people think.
              So if you successfully manage to replant store-bought seeds/plants, then it's decent enough for long-term?

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >honestly i wouldnt buy seeds off amazon,
              ... Yeah? I wouldn't either.
              I'd buy from dedicated seed sellers.
              Or even just heirloom nurseries for perennials that take a while to start producing.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this is partly true, shit gets frozen so you can buy it all year long. food loses some flavor and tissue gets damaged by freezing it.
      "flash frozen" should reduce this damage, and it does a pretty good job, although this is the case for meat, i am not 100% sure if this is also the case for vegetables. but it would make sense.
      but fresh is best. and it will always remain best.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >but fresh is best. and it will always remain best
        Not for peas. Those are actually better when frozen.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    no, it's just their taste buds are failing with old age

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >"it's too bland"
      >"too much salt"
      >"too much spicy"
      The sound of dealing with boomers that mostly drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes. They can't enjoy a real meal and blame it on the ingredients.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        no, it's just their taste buds are failing with old age

        c**t, I have a garden and I can tell you right now that the difference is chalk and cheese.
        If you think snowpeas from the store that have been sitting in cling-wrap for a week, in the off season for snowpeas are the same as fresh snowpeas right off the vine you've either never had them right off the vine and are talking out your arse, or you're fricking delusional.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >"it's too bland"
      >"too much salt"
      >"too much spicy"
      The sound of dealing with boomers that mostly drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes. They can't enjoy a real meal and blame it on the ingredients.

      That's bullshit I garden and my food tastes way better than the grocery store equivalent
      You don't even need to have a garden to figure this out, buy some fresh tomatoes and can them, and compare them against quality canned tomatoes that were canned ripe and in season
      It's all about soil depletion and artificial growing conditions, the food is literally less nutritious and bland-tasting

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/Lu4kzw5.png

        [...]
        c**t, I have a garden and I can tell you right now that the difference is chalk and cheese.
        If you think snowpeas from the store that have been sitting in cling-wrap for a week, in the off season for snowpeas are the same as fresh snowpeas right off the vine you've either never had them right off the vine and are talking out your arse, or you're fricking delusional.

        What the hell you two spastic greenthumbs are talking about? I didn't even mention gardenning and you autists sperging on how your veggie dildos taste like it was top notch gourmet shit. Fricking boomers man..

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You made assumptions and they made an ass out of you and umption

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Ur a gay homosexual kys

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Boomers say the food is worse
          >>THEY'RE JUST DUMB AND ARE OLD
          >>>Um ackshually the food is fricking worse because it's grown out of season
          >>WHAT ARE YOU EVEN TALKING ABOUT
          We're talking about you being wrong.
          Shit tastes worse if it's prepared worse than how it used to be.
          You dopey c**t.

          Fricking adderall addled your brains. Go grow some poppies for those opiates, you're fricked c**t.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It depends
      In Europe for instance, dutch tomatos are known for being tasteless plastic for some reason
      It doesn't even apply to other crops they grow, it's their tomato specifically that are shit

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    try growing your own veggies and see. most cultivars in supermarkets have been bred or otherwise genetically modified to look good vs. tasting good.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That would require looking around in smaller farms for decent seeds, doesn't it?
      I think I might pick up gardening in future, the soil depletion is going to frick us over soon.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can order heirloom varieties online

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Ah, of course.
          I wonder if there is a way to make sure the seeds are legit, tho.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Now when I think about it, I already had store-bought garlic replanted successfully continuously for few years.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            the best way to check is to grow them lol

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Yeah, but it takes time and you might end up giving money to scammers.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                could also end up with some horrid invasive species kek

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Buy from actual, dedicated, verified seed sellers. They're a thing.
                I've got some in Australia I use, one for heirloom vegetables, two for herbs and flowers, one for weirder plants like spiderflowers and black tumeric, and one that sell fruit tree saplings.

                And all of them have a set-aside for natives, which is how I found out about shit like coppertops, saltbush, and bolwarra, and that coastal pigface fruits are edible and taste like sherbert.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I will try to take a look around. It's now a season to plant stuff, so gotta hurry.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any time OP
    Make sure you keep buying our seeds (tm)

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You're right, they taste better because we don't just boil them like boomers

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stop buying supermarket crap that has been lying in fulfillment depots for weeks. It's all about freshness.
    Actually modern veggies taste better as they did 50 years ago since all the bitterness was bread out

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Everything I was going to say has already been said, so I'll just tell you to grow your own stuff to see the difference for yourself. It doesn't have to be a big project, just some beets in a window box is enough to start you off.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depends in the product. Corn and Apples have vastly improved. Sweet corn is something that you used to have to buy from the field basically, because it lost its sweetness so fast.

    When I was a kid the most commonly available apples were Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Fuji, and Granny Smith. Granny's are goated because they are exceptional for baking and storage, but of the other three only Fuji is okay. Now back then Fujis were better quality because they weren't all Chinese, but modern apple varieties like Honeycrisp, Royal Gala, etc. mog the old dessert apple options.

    Another vastly improved product is Brussel Sprouts. Used to be so fricking bitter, modern ones have been bred to actually taste good.

    Citrus is also improved. The boxed Christmas mandarins are still around and great, but the dekopon mandarins that have entered the market recently in North America are the best I have ever had.

    The only real loser is the tomato. Its been over optimized for durability and shelf life at the expense of flavour. But all the good heirloom varieties are still available at your farmers market or in your garden.

    Part of it is just we spend less on food than ever before. People in the 60s spent 18% of their disposal income on food, 15% on groceries for the home.

    Before COViD that had dropped to 10% on food and 5% on groceries. I bet if you just tripled your grocery budget the food would be better across the board.

    Also, frozen food is so good its unreal nowadays. Its incredible how far its come. It was piss poor trailer trash food until the early 2000s, but now the tech for freezing food has gotten so good there's barely a difference in quality for many products.

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