tenderizing chicken using baking soda - to rinse or not to rinse?

I plan to marinade some chicken breast meat in wet brine with some baking soda. Do I need to rinse the meat afterwards or can I go ahead and stir fry it right away? The meat is going to be cut in pieces so I want to avoid rinsing it if possible. Different online sources just keep parroting one another with no understanding of why things need to be done certain ways. What do you think?

Schizophrenic Conspiracy Theorist Shirt $21.68

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

Schizophrenic Conspiracy Theorist Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Try it both ways and tell us what you think

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      that may actually be a good idea, although it is annoying

      You would rinse BEFORE you marinade, not after. You're trying to rinse away bird poop particles and weird shit from the factory it was processed at.

      Black person detected. I can assure you there's no shit on my chicken.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You would rinse BEFORE you marinade, not after. You're trying to rinse away bird poop particles and weird shit from the factory it was processed at.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You don't clean raw meat, are you moronic? This is literally the #1 cause of cross contamination. You haven't needed to rinse off chicken since the 70s.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        that may actually be a good idea, although it is annoying

        [...]
        Black person detected. I can assure you there's no shit on my chicken.

        It is rinsed in a tub at the factory, so it's bathed in chicken shit right before it gets packaged. I can't believe you would trust companies like that.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >american chicken comes poop flavored from factory

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Chicken was rinsed off to get bone chips and stuff off it. That's not an issue now. By washing your chicken you're just filling your sink with salmonella.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >I can't believe you would trust companies like that.
          but the TV said it was ok not to...

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Or maybe my personal experience of eating unwashed chicken and never getting food poisoning from it.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Poop is healthy to eat as long as it's cooked well, extra nutrients

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Baking soda has a distinctive metallic aftertaste. If you cook and eat it as-is and it's bad, you'll be able to taste it immediately.

      *CHIRP*

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Blank reply
        Why?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >wypipo aint even bleach dey chicken sheeeeeit

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >now that I've put flavor on my chicken, I should wash off all of the flavor right?
        You're moronic, does this help you understand how idiotic your question is op? You definitely remind me of the stupid Black folk that use bleach and soap like here

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      do americans really

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://www.pcrm.org/news/news-releases/usda-refuses-protect-consumers-fecal-contamination-chicken-and-other-meat

        It's either rinse the chicken or become vegan.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's cute that you think you can avoid contaminants in literally everything.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          and thats why you thoroughly cook your food you Black person and not wash it in your sink and spread salmonela to your whole kitchen

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It depends how much water and how much baking soda you are using in your wet brine. If you are using 1tsp and 1litre, you don’t need to rinse. If you are using 1tsp and 50ml water to 1 chicken fillet, yes you do need to rinse. You don’t want to consume more than a max of 1/4 tsp of baking soda in one meal because it has a chemical taste of soap.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      thanks Anon, that's something I can work with

      do you eat table spoons of baking soda? no? then rinse it off.

      we're talking about a teaspoon of soda or less, which is commonly added into dough when baking so it can't be too bad

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Also, when I’m velveting chicken strips with salt and baking soda, and I’m not going to rinse the velveting mixture, I would use 1/4 tsp soda for 2 chicken fillets. 1/8th for 1 fillet. Asian sauces often need a subtle sourness and too much baking soda will easily ruin the balance.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          right, this is what I wanted to do. I'll just give it a shot.

          https://i.imgur.com/qSBatkL.jpg

          >wypipo aint even bleach dey chicken sheeeeeit

          wait a minute. Wouldn't washing chicken with bleach achieve the same results as velveting it with soda? What if they are on to something?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It’s me again. Forgot to say, I vastly prefer the non rinse method, because when I did baking soda in water with cut chicken, the chicken muscle disintegrated and the raw chicken looked like pic related. It also happened when I rubbed it on dry and later rinsed. Secondly, baking soda only partly dissolves in water, therefore if you’re making a baking soda brine you have no idea how strong it will be. In my opinion, either salt brine or rub small amounts of baking soda and salt on dry, and eat the whole thing. Max 1/8 tsp of soda per person and you won’t over do it.

          Also draining and drying cut chicken peices is a pain for just 1-2 servings

          You can also overdo it with time, for both salt and soda. High conc for short time, low conc for long time.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      do not trust any poster that says wet or dry brine. they likely play with their balls and sniff the fingers before preparing food. there is salting and there is brining.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It adds to the flavour

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Rinse after anon although the amount of baking soda you use is negligible

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    do you eat table spoons of baking soda? no? then rinse it off.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >this fricking guy doesn’t eat tablespoons of baking soda

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    there are several ways to velvet chicken and when you do the baking soda way, you are supposed to rinse it off.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    try rinsing. I find the bicarb does a great job of tenderizing but sometimes you can go absolutely hypertense if you eat that shit and it's alarming. It has a shitton of sodium in it. Rinsing the baking soda away won't un-tenderize it, it'll just save you a frickload of sodium intake and weird baking soda flavours. I'm convinced the so called "chinese restaurant syndrome" was never from MSG but from the baking soda they velvet all the meats with

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I can understand that with large cuts but how am I supposed to wash bite-sized pieces? I've never been a fan of washing chicken (or any meat, unless there are small fragments of bone or slime that I can wash away) so I want to avoid it if at all possible. I'll start brining in about 12 hours so there's still time for me to figure this out.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        wait are you brining or velveting? velveting takes like 30 minutes. just use a strainer to rinse it and toss it on some paper towels. if you're going to then marinate the water won't really matter much, just adjust your marinade potency accordingly

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          kind of both, like add (a small amount of) soda into the brine (with salt, garlic pwdr, onion pwdr, pepper, maybe paprika) and let it brine overnight (already discarded at this point in time) or at least for few hours (the plan for tomorrow).

          I've even considered to marinate first (to let salt and flavors penetrate the meat), then velvet using soda and rinse, but I still want to avoid rinsing the chicken pieces if possible.

          >now that I've put flavor on my chicken, I should wash off all of the flavor right?
          You're moronic, does this help you understand how idiotic your question is op? You definitely remind me of the stupid Black folk that use bleach and soap like here

          by marinating the flavors get inside so a quick rinse won't wash them away. I still want to avoid the rinsing, though.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            what I would be interested to try is velvet, rinse, marinate, cook. after velveting the meat will be broken down and falling apart, the marinade will literally be sopped into the pores and broken proteins of the meat almost immediately. shit gets spongy.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              interesting. I think I could do that. I have two chicken breasts, so I could apply this technique to one and do brine then velveting to the other, and compare.

              Too much baking soda makes food completely inedible. You get this horrid taste that sticks on your tongue and gets worse and worse with every bite. I'd wash it and not risk ruining the entire meal.

              thank you, I take your point onboard. That's why I want to use a rather small amount of soda (max 1/2 teaspoon, or rather 1/4, for 2 chicken breasts, in brine of 100-200 ml wine)

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                This is good scientific method. You don't have a control but we all know chicken breast well enough. I think this comparison is going to be helpful. I haven't decided on my preferred velveting technique yet, only that accidentally eating too much baking soda almost sends me into a coma so I need to figure this out. You must rapport back, I must know.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                alright so even though this is going to be extra work I'm going to do the following:
                - two chicken breasts cut the same way
                - batch 1: velvet in 1/2 tsp soda and 100 ml water, rinse well, then brine (see below)
                - batch 2: brine, then velvet in 1/2 tsp soda (I'll use 0.1g scales to make both batches equal) and 100 ml water, rinse

                both batches will be breaded in panko + microplane'd pecorino romano and shallow fried, shoutout to Adam Ragusea

                brine is always going to be 100 ml Noilly Prat, 1 tsp garlic pwdr, 1 tsp onion pwdr, 1 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp kampot pepper

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                ok so shit is brining or velveting. One batch velveting will be done in 14 min, then rinse and brine. More updates in about 12 hours when the process is equalized (velvet the brined batch).

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                anon I've never seen the baking soda diluted in water, you're sposta just rub it into the meat dry

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                that's not realistic with bite-sized pieces, I'd be using way too much soda for that. Soda in water it is.

                12 hours seems excessive, most places do 15-30 minutes

                that's their problem, not mine. I'm marinading overnight.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                aight

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                12 hours seems excessive, most places do 15-30 minutes

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Too much baking soda makes food completely inedible. You get this horrid taste that sticks on your tongue and gets worse and worse with every bite. I'd wash it and not risk ruining the entire meal.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    alright everyone, so batch 1 is velveted and is brining, batch 2 is brining and will be velveted tomorrow. Despite my initial intention both batches will be rinsed so the A/B test is the order of velveting/brining. The marinade for both batches is the same (weighed shit to 0.1 g). Catch you later.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      you will likely need to make a new thread but I will keep an eye out

      nighty-night anon

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        this board is slow af, this thread will survive 24 hrs easily

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        that's literally me going to bed at 5 am after a good night shit posting

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No rinse. not supposed to use a lot. just little.
    work best on beef to tenderize. no brine.
    if you used lot it will have the flavor.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >tenderizing chicken using baking soda
    Why? It chicken.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It can be tough and stringy. Depends on the quality.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      velveting chicken is pretty neato. I find the chicken is not nearly as filling probably on account of how much the protein gets damaged in the process but it makes for a wonderful mouthfeel in a sturfy or such

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    just velvet the meat with a slurry of cornstarch and soy sauce. Baking soda has a bad tendency to make everything taste like shit, it's basically a lesser version of salt. You get the silky texture from the cornstarch and the chicken will get tenderized from the soy sauce. Making your food too alkaline will only result in a bitter and tasteless mess.

    This being said, the secret to stir-frying tender chicken is to cut a half frozen breast into thin slices, against the grain. Not velveting, which isn't very necessary so long as there is a cornstarch slurry thrown in your wok somewhere along the way along with some sesame oil.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You’re so under experienced here. Salting/brining changes the texture of meat. Baking soda creates a delicious change of texture that’s great for stir fries or fried chicken, without making the meat salty. It’s fundamentally different than velveting with cornstarch or anything that just coats the meat.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'd just cook the chicken breast whole, then slice it up at the end combining whatever.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *