the American section at the supermarket. how accurate is it?

the American section at the supermarket
how accurate is it?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The American section around here has a lot of cheese, soda and chips.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Which supermarquette? Weird how they put arizona icetea there. It's been a thing in europe for over a decade I feel.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Food produced in different countries tend to have different tastes. Coke Cola being the most obvious example.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I know but I thought there was no difference between the imported stuff and the european stuff tbh lol.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          American industrial foods are quite unique worldwide.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen all the candy before, but as an American all the chips, pop corn, and pancake stuff are all a weird brand I've never seen. I'd say half that shelf isn't a brand that is sold in America.

    Also, why is it all just chips and candy?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Also, why is it all just chips and candy?
      What else could be put here?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Are you moronic?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          This is a "typical food" section, it contains stuff that certain country makes well and is famous for? Candy, chips and soda are pretty much the typical American grocery food.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            If your entire knowledge of American supermarkets comes from internet memes then sure.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              You're a complete dipshit.
              [...]
              OP said it was the "American isle".

              Mind to tell us something that is typical and well made in the US, that should also be added?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                moron: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_American_foods

                He said it was the american "section". If you look left you can see other snacks and chocolate. It is obviously a small shelf reserved for american snacks in an aisle reserved for snacks in general.

                Gotcha

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Can you list a single typical and good American food beside these?
                >No, there's none, here's a wikipedia page
                A shame, I expected to find at least one example.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                The list of American food is so large I'm not going to spend fricking hours typing it all up for your dumb ass, especially when it's already been done. have a nice day immediately.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >There are too many, that's why I can't post a single one.
                Let me help you:

                [...]
                Mind to tell us something that is typical and well made in the US, that should also be added?

                Microwave meals, kosher goods, half-ready cake mix.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I posted a link containing an entire list of foods broken down by category with links breaking the categories into sub categories and regions. What more could you want? Fricking shit for brains. I hope you're just acting moronic for some unknown reason.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >What more could you want? Fricking shit for brains. I hope you're just acting moronic for some unknown reason.
                I asked for American food that is both typical and good, instead I got an unrelated link and a mental breakdown.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Barbecue (aka actually slow smoked meat) you fricking moron.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >slow smoked meat is American...
                No, it's something pretty much every single human culture has, most of them since before the US was created, and American barbecue is sub-par.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >American barbecue is sub-par
                You've either never been to America or you got BBQ in frickin NYC or something.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'd say that some of these are not legal due to laws on additives (like root beer), or are not typically American (like sauces)

                [...]
                It's not bad, but Brazilians, Argentinians, Uruguayans, Turks, Greeks... all do it better.

                Tell us where in America you tried barbecue. You're very suspiciously dodging the question.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Tell us where in America you tried barbecue.
                Texas, California, Nevada (Las Vegas), Georgia and Florida.

                I guess these must be the only states with bad BBQ, right?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                And did you go to an actual hole in the wall barbecue place, someone's home, or just some random chain restaurant?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                He's never been to the United States, dude. He just named every state he knew off the top of his head.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >And did you go to an actual hole in the wall barbecue place, someone's home, or just some random chain restaurant?
                When I visited California, I went mostly to chain restaurants, some pretty expensive ones.
                At Georgia, Texas and Florida the people I was working with, and a few expats (I visited the little-my-country) took me to some less known places.
                I only eat BBQ at the hotel at Nevada.

                I'm talking food that seems relatively uniquely American. a dozen candies and sugary cereals aren't uniquely American.

                Sometimes products made in the US are different from similar products elsewhere, even if they share brand.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                The only difference in that pic is the sugar source.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Different sweetener greatly change the flavor, texture and other properties of food.

                Have you ever drunk a Kosher/Mexican Coke Cola?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >At Georgia, Texas and Florida the people I was working with, and a few expats (I visited the little-my-country) took me to some less known places.
                I'll accept this answer. Expensive restaurants, chains, and hotels don't do good barbecue.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm not going to lie, I ate at a Brazilian churrascaria in Florida and it was amazing.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >UK label is allowed to just say "tomatoes" and "spice" without specifying tomato concentrate and exactly which spices are used
                >somehow this is better
                Why are Brits/Euros all so terrified of comprehensive ingredients lists, and why do they think grouping items together under overly-broad terms is a good thing?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >somehow this is better
                The only one trying to say "mine is better" is you, this is just a way to show how the same product of the same brand can be different in the US and Europe.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Don't be disingenuous.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You guys could try to give up when caught red-handed, it'd make the board better for everyone.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Who do you mean by "you guys"? Americans? This is an American website. And you know full well why people post those comparisons.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Are there less allergies in the UK?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I think the US is number one, when it comes to allergies.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >instead I got an unrelated link
                Ah, there's the problem. You're too stupid to navigate a list. Could've just said you were moronic originally and avoided all this. Next time, do so. moron.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >be european
                >be illiterate

                Come on mates, less name-calling and more examples.

                Barbecue (aka actually slow smoked meat) you fricking moron.

                Barbecue is not typically American, and American barbecue is not notably good.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You already got a list with every single American food known to man. What more could we possibly give you?

                >slow smoked meat is American...
                No, it's something pretty much every single human culture has, most of them since before the US was created, and American barbecue is sub-par.

                BBQ is unique to America. Saying otherwise is just straight up ignorant.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >What more could we possibly give you?
                A single (1) example of an American food that is both typical (as in, others have not been eating it for centuries before the US) and good.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Banana bread. Which is the first food on the list I gave you, dipshit.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Cornbread and corn cakes.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                These are universal, not typical of the US.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Not remotely, considering that curb is native to the New World and cornbread is made in only two other countries I can think of off hand. We certainly don't make it in mine, despite cornmeal being readily available, not in any of those neighbouring it

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Just because something is typical of Central America, it doesn't mean it's unique to the US, if anything it probably has arrived in Europe five centuries ago, before the US was colonized.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No. Cornbread isn't native to any part of the New World that the Spanish colonised and was, originally, made by northern-ish tribes who encountered other Europeans who had little interest in taking anything back to Europe other than tobacco. These tribes had been making cornpone, the direct predecessor of cornbread, since long before Europeans set foot in the New World and the only Europeans with sustained contact with the tribes who make it, the Algonquins, are the British.
                It's a simple flat bread made by gelatinising cornmeal with heat, water and ash. The British added wheat flour and fat to pone, creating modern cornbread.
                Central American corn tortillas are unlike cornbread or pone because the corn is treated with lye prior to grinding and the batter is untreated while pone has the corn itself untreated but the batter treated with ash for leavening.
                If you'd like to argue that Central American tortillas count as cornbread, then you must also agree that hotdogs are ham.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                My mistake, but for what I know Aztecs had some forms of bread, despite they not being as popular as tortillas and similar

                >The British added wheat flour and fat to pone, creating modern cornbread.
                Spanish had modern cornbread far before the British.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >My mistake, but for what I know Aztecs had some forms of bread
                False, as mesoamerica lacked the technology for leavening and wheat flour anywhere. The first bread-like good Mesoamerica had other than tortilla was cool, which was developed after the Spaniards brought wheat and dairy to the region. It wasn't made with corn and no blend of the two had ever appeared in the historical record.
                Again: the Spaniards didn't know what pone was and had no knowledge of anything similar to it.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >False, as mesoamerica lacked the technology for leavening and wheat flour anywhere. The first bread-like good Mesoamerica had other than tortilla was cool, which was developed after the Spaniards brought wheat and dairy to the region. It wasn't made with corn and no blend of the two had ever appeared in the historical record.
                Are you really trying to say the Aztecs lacked the technology to make cornbread while the primitives in today's US had it?

                >Again: the Spaniards didn't know what pone was and had no knowledge of anything similar to it.
                Why you lie?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Had Mesoamerica any knowledge of any sort of leavening, chemical or otherwise, they would have had leavened foods. They didn't have even one before cocol was developed after contact with the Spaniards.
                >lie
                Not remotely. Besides the fact that cornpone was not eaten south of the Chesapeake and Spaniards never made it that far north, had they any knowledge of pone, they'd have written about pone.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Had Mesoamerica any knowledge of any sort of leavening, chemical or otherwise, they would have had leavened foods.
                You keep making this claim, so how about you try to source it for once?

                Maybe you're right, but this sound far too much like American revisionism for me.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                They invented nixtamalization, but didn't use ash to bake, and soda ash wasn't invented until 1791

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The source is the fact that they didn't have any prior to cocol, which was developed post Spanish contact.
                The onus to prove otherwise is yours, not mine.
                >American revisionism
                Hardly. Besides the fact that I'm not from America, your attempt to argue anything outside of the anthropological facts currently known is there very definition of revisionism. I'm simply stating facts. Pone is the predecessor to cornbread. Pone is chemically leavened. Chemical leavening is a technique invented by the Algonquins. The Algonquins had no contact with mesoamerica. Mesoamerica had no knowledge of any sort of leavening prior to Spanish contact. Spaniards never went as far north as the Chesapeake. These are facts.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Mate, I misunderstood what leavening meant, despite it not being required to make cornbread.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Chuckwagon chili, Cincinnati chili, hot tamales, Denver chili, ambrosia salad, buffalo wings, pecan pie, corn dogs, chocolate chip cookies, ranch dressing, tater tots, peanut butter, gumbo, cobbler, brownies, bubble gum, marshmallow, root beer, sassafras, sarsaparilla, cola, American cheese and Velveeta, johnny cakes, corn bread, pone, banana pudding, corn nuts, pecan rolls, fried chicken, hot sauce, white barbecue, chimichangas, root beer floats, jambalaya, basically all instant cereal, chicken fried steak, hot chicken I don't have all day

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >BBQ is unique to America. Saying otherwise is just straight up ignorant.
                No anon, barbecue is something every single human culture has been doing since the dawn of mankind, and most of them do it far better than Americans.

                There's a huge difference between your people being attached to something and it being typical.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >every single culture has been smoking foods with selective cuts of wood and drenching meats in a vinegar-sweet based sauce
                are europoors this moronic...?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Traditional Texas barbecue doesn't use sauce. It's just smoky and moist as all frick meats. Has its roots in German tradition. When done correctly no sauce is used or required. Brisket just melts in your mouth like some Japanese wagyu.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >every single culture has been smoking foods with selective cuts of wood and drenching meats in a vinegar-sweet based sauce
                I'm not that other Anon but actually, yes. You need to be more specific with the definition, I think. I understand what you mean though.
                Despite there being similar foods and meat preparations throughout the world, there's something different about American barbecue and I don't know what that is exactly. As for an example of vinegary wood-smoked meat from elsewhere, some varieties of shashlik are marinated in vinegar and cooked over wood smoke. Same for many types of sausages throughout Europe.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It seems he's literally trying to claim Americans invented cooking meat with fire.

                Ok so you're continuing to feign Illiteracy and argue with strawmen. Enjoy your last (You)

                There's literally nothing by namecalling and offenses in this post.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Americans invented cooking meat with fire
                No, I don't think anon is. There is something different about American barbecue but as an absolute novice to the style (and not being from the US originally) I can't quite articulate what, exactly, sets it apart but when the other anon above said that it was cooked indirectly, that's part of it. Typically, barbecue isn't cooked over fire directly but rather, it's cooked by the heat of its smoke. My barbecue has the fire in a separate box next to where the meat goes. The smoke it creates billows into the main chamber through a flue and the fire gets fed new bits of wood every now and again to keep it going. A second flue and the chimney help control the temperature and the rate of smoke going into the main chamber.
                It's not quite cold smoking, like we do in my home country and not hot smoking like they do in Asia. It's a different technique and I would agree with the Americans that said technique is uniquely theirs.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Fun fact: the secret ingredient to korean barbecue is coca cola.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Isn't the "ancient" South Korean culture created a few decades ago under American occupation?

                Fun fact: North Koreans use lots of beet sugar in their barbecues.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yes. Korea is only one generation ahead of arab oil states in being beverly hillbillies

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yes it was enhanced by the American GI. American cheese, spam, and coca cola are now very common ingredients across Korean cuisine. And let me tell you it's fricking delicious.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Personally I don't like South Korean barbecue, it seems like Japanese barbecue with slop added.

                >Americans invented cooking meat with fire
                No, I don't think anon is. There is something different about American barbecue but as an absolute novice to the style (and not being from the US originally) I can't quite articulate what, exactly, sets it apart but when the other anon above said that it was cooked indirectly, that's part of it. Typically, barbecue isn't cooked over fire directly but rather, it's cooked by the heat of its smoke. My barbecue has the fire in a separate box next to where the meat goes. The smoke it creates billows into the main chamber through a flue and the fire gets fed new bits of wood every now and again to keep it going. A second flue and the chimney help control the temperature and the rate of smoke going into the main chamber.
                It's not quite cold smoking, like we do in my home country and not hot smoking like they do in Asia. It's a different technique and I would agree with the Americans that said technique is uniquely theirs.

                It's normal to assume some generic stuff about your country is unique when you lack experience with other cultures. I used to assume strawberry yogurt was like this.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >t's normal to assume some generic stuff about your country is unique when you lack experience with other cultures. I used to assume strawberry yogurt was like this.
                And how, madam, is that relevant to the post you replying to?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >. There is something different about American barbecue but as an absolute novice to the style (and not being from the US originally) I can't quite articulate what, exactly,
                About this guy clearly is assuming something very genetic is unique out of ignorance.

                Food made at our home countries to feel somehow unique, even when they are generic, and this is healthy. Trying to pretend it's objectively unique is not.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Did you miss the part where he explained that difference, ma'am?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I've seen he describes how many other people do barbecue.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah? So which countries use an offset firebox smoker to barbecue meat? As far as I've read, and don't tell the Texans this, but the two chambered offset smoker was first invented and used in Southern California. The modern type with the chimney and adjustable flues was invented in Texas, tho.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >California
                OKLAHOMA
                idk ytf I said California lmao

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >So which countries use an offset firebox smoker to barbecue meat?
                It's not common, but I've seen Argentinians and Uruguayans doing this.

                Do you know what bread is Black person?

                Apparently an American invention, if we are to trust some people in this board.

                But tell me how Spanish colonies lacked bread.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >European education
                How the frick was central and south America supposed to make bread without the ingredients necessary to make bread? You know, mill, flour, and (chicken) eggs. None of which are indigenous to America. Good lord you're moronic.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You know central American was colonized before the US right?

                Havana was founded on 1515 while NYC was founded in 1624.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >(chicken) eggs
                Not necessary for bread and most don't use any. Also, there are breeds of chicken native to with America which were brought over before the Columbian exchange directly from South America by seafaring Polynesians. I only learned about that myself about a year ago and I was surprised af

                https://i.imgur.com/3o013nj.png

                S-shut up!

                Sorry. It's a fairly nice, slept on state. Just stay away from Wilmington.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Milk and flour are, dipshit.

                You know central American was colonized before the US right?

                Havana was founded on 1515 while NYC was founded in 1624.

                How does other parts being colonized before make patacons magically transform into bread?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >How does other parts being colonized before make patacons magically transform into bread?
                Being European colonies means they had milk, flour and eggs; pretty hard to see no one making banana bread until some American decided to make it in 1870, specially when I know some banana cakes from here that are very closer to banana bread and centuries older than this.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                So your source is that you made it up?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >pretty hard to see
                So you have zero proof and we're supposed to go off your vibes or something? Shut the frick up moron. I linked a Wikipedia article that is sourced to shit on the origins of banana bread. I have throughly disproven you. Good night, moron.

                >I'll pretend anything I don't like is fake... this way the US can be the first
                The US has the first written banana bread recipe, but it was a pretty common dish in Mexico, Central and South American.

                This habit of demanding others to pretend the US invented everything (something) is annoying.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >*it was a pretty common dish in Mexico, Central and South American
                *citation needed. Tik tok moron, we're waiting.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >pretty hard to see
                So you have zero proof and we're supposed to go off your vibes or something? Shut the frick up moron. I linked a Wikipedia article that is sourced to shit on the origins of banana bread. I have throughly disproven you. Good night, moron.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Milk is not necessary for the vast majority of breads. Neither is butter or oil or lard or whatever other thing you're thinking about naming next. You could have left it at flour, as wheat was not available to the new world, but every other thing you try to puke on just comes across as extremely childish and utterly ignorant of bread-baking altogether

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Central American colonies had cities with milk, eggs and flour for a century before the first US cities were founded.

                >*it was a pretty common dish in Mexico, Central and South American
                *citation needed. Tik tok moron, we're waiting.

                >I won, because...
                Sure, if you want me to call you the kang, you just had to ask.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Every coastal city has access to fish but sushi is definitely from Japan. You might be the dumbest mother fricker on Culinaly.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Banana cakes are a staple in every single Hispanic country and in Brazil.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Banana cakes are not banana bread. Dumb ass.
                I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :).

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I guess if we purposefully ignore all recipes except the US banana bread, then we can pretend the US invented the banana bread.

                It's like when you guys tried to change what "space" mean so you could be first to go there.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Still no source on banana bread being invented anywhere other than the US. Tik tok tik tok. I win 🙂

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Culinaly would be much better without your kind lying and coping to "win" imaginary battles.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Wow, still no source despite your claims? You seemed pretty sure of yourself. Maybe you were wrong? Tik tok tik tok tik tok. I win :).

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Still no source on banana bread being invented anywhere other than the US. Tik tok tik tok. I win 🙂

                Banana cakes are not banana bread. Dumb ass.
                I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :).

                Still no source on Latin America making banana bread. I win until you post a source proving banana bread was made first somewhere other than America. I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :).

                And it's Europeans who are triggered and baiting.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >make bold claims
                >get proven wrong with sources
                >still claim to be right, but can't provide a source
                Yeah dude, totally Americans baiting. Even though multiple sources have been provided, and just general historical knowledge of what ingredients were available pre contact easily proves the Euro wrong.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >multiple sources
                >general knowledge
                It's literally one or two American guys saying "cakes doesn't count" to cope.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                No. Americans have access to Caribbean and Latin American food, and obviously our own. Banana cakes are not even close to American banana bread. Euros looking at images on the internet have no reference and are desperately trying to be right despite being proved wrong, with sources, again and again.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Banana cakes are not even close to American banana bread.
                We already got it, it's an oddly narrow definition so you can be first.

                Congratulation on inventing the first "banana bread according the US specifications", i guess.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                And the Brits were the first to put meat in pastry dough to British specifications
                The Germans were the first to put ground meat in a tube to German specification
                The Italians were the first to make noodles to Italian specifications
                Your entire argument is moot.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >And the Brits were the first to put meat in pastry dough to British specifications
                Yes, meatbread is older than the UK.

                >The Germans were the first to put ground meat in a tube to German specification
                Yes, sausages is older than Germany

                >The Italians were the first to make noodles to Italian specifications
                Yes, pasta is older than Italy.

                Good three examples of food that was not invented in some countries.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                But the variations of them are associated with the culture they were modified in. You may as well just say that no country has unique food because some other country did something similar 9001 years ago. I bet you’re insufferable to your family and “””friends””” during get-togethers.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                The difference is that Italians and Germans doesn't seem to have a massive inferiority complex and try to cope by pretending they invented things they copied then slowly modified.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                ….HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHSHAHSHAHAHAHAHAHAHSHSHAHSHAHAHAHAHAHSHSHAHDHSIDUHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

                HAVE YOU EVER TRIED TO GIVE AN ITALIAN AMERICAN PIZZA OR A GERMAN AN AMERICAN STYLED SAUSAGE????
                Jesus Christ, they literally shit their pants and whine how “it’s not real because ours is better!” Especially Italians. God forbid you make an Italian dish yourself and 99% of the country will stick their nose up as their Depends fill with diarrhea.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >….HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHSHAHSHAHAHAHAHAHAHSHSHAHSHAHAHAHAHAHSHSHAHDHSIDUHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
                >Reddit space
                >HAVE YOU EVER TRIED TO GIVE AN ITALIAN AMERICAN PIZZA OR A GERMAN AN AMERICAN STYLED SAUSAGE????
                Wow.

                German sausages are far better than American ones, they probably don't like yours because of this. Italians tend to eat more American-style pizza, except in a few regions.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Different flavors for different usages. You wouldn’t eat them in the same manner. At least we’re beginning to acknowledge there’s a difference from society to society and not all sausages are the same.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >At least we’re beginning to acknowledge there’s a difference from society to society and not all sausages are the same.
                The problem is when someone start to demand others to accept "Americans invented sausages" because food has local variations.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I don’t think anyone is actually implying that, at least not intentionally. This could be because of a language barrier of sorts. We know that we didn’t actually invent these things, but when we say it we’re thinking of our regional cuisine and expecting others to know that is what we mean.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >We know that we didn’t actually invent these things
                You and maybe others are not claiming it, but there is at least one guy claiming Americans invented banana bread.

                See:

                No one ITT has suggested there was another style of banana bread other than American? What are you taking about? Some dumb ass Euro has googled his ass off trying to find something similar and came up with patacons. Seriously, look up a picture of banana bread and patacons and tell me that's similar. When that failed he is now trying banana cake, which usually has frosting and is a totally different taste than banana bread. Banana cake is actually more common in Asia and comes from the United States occupation of the Philippines, so even that falls flat.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I am both those people. Holy frick can you not read? America definitely invented banana bread. Look, again: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana_bread . There is no debate. If you think there is then provide a source or shut up.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >America definitely invented banana bread.
                As long as we limit "banana bread" to a very narrow definition so all older recipes are excluded.

                Did you know Americans invented sausages?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                What older recipe is similar to American banana bread?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Did you know Americans invented sausages?
                yup just like pizza, tacos, burgers, fries, etc. (just too many to list). we are the best at creating new iconic foods, only ones in the world good at it really

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Funnily enough barbecue sausages are popular with the few white tourists in Texas. Reminds me of that video of the new Zealanders eating Texas sausage.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Reminds me of that video of the new Zealanders eating Texas sausage.
                Poor guys.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Don't forget this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judgment_of_Paris_(wine)
                Euros literally seethe with rage whenever an American does anything. You can also see this thread where they get so mad they don't even understand how Pit BBQ works.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >If Italian invented pasta and Germans invented sausages, than Americans invented Banana bread,
                Kek

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Nice strawman, but that’s not what I was saying at all. The variation in recipes is what makes it unique to a specific country.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >The variation in recipes is what makes it unique to a specific country.
                Sure, we can all agree Americans were the first to invent the American variation of banana bread, this is something.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                And was that not what was originally implied before yuropoors derailed the thread into some “well ackshulay” pissing contest?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                If you ask some Americans this thread, they'll keep telling you "American style banana bread" is the only banana bread, other doesn't count so they invented banana bread.

                I think it's this guy:

                ….HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHSHAHSHAHAHAHAHAHAHSHSHAHSHAHAHAHAHAHSHSHAHDHSIDUHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

                HAVE YOU EVER TRIED TO GIVE AN ITALIAN AMERICAN PIZZA OR A GERMAN AN AMERICAN STYLED SAUSAGE????
                Jesus Christ, they literally shit their pants and whine how “it’s not real because ours is better!” Especially Italians. God forbid you make an Italian dish yourself and 99% of the country will stick their nose up as their Depends fill with diarrhea.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Nope, both are me. I wouldn’t say it’s the only banana bread. I’d say our spin on it makes it unique to our country and it’s dumb to say that it’s the same as one from Central America. You wouldn’t put them in the Hispanic food section.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >You wouldn’t put them in the Hispanic food section.
                For all that I know, American supermarket will put food in sections based on stereotypes, not origin. This is why pasta will go to "Italian" instead of "Chinese".

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                A typical grocer will have aisles for certain international foods. A generalized Asian section and South American section are common. Pasta is in the pasta aisle. Pasta is a pretty popular food item in the US. It's quick, its easy, it's tasty, and it's perfect for leftovers.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                No one ITT has suggested there was another style of banana bread other than American? What are you taking about? Some dumb ass Euro has googled his ass off trying to find something similar and came up with patacons. Seriously, look up a picture of banana bread and patacons and tell me that's similar. When that failed he is now trying banana cake, which usually has frosting and is a totally different taste than banana bread. Banana cake is actually more common in Asia and comes from the United States occupation of the Philippines, so even that falls flat.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >it's an oddly narrow definition
                If I said I was going to give you chocolate cake and then gave you a bowl of chocolate syrup would you be confused? Banana cakes and banana bread are not at all similar. It would be like saying ramen is the same as spaghetti blognese because both dishes have noodles and meat. You're so fricking stupid lol

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Bro, we got it, American banana cake is unlike anything before, it's totally not an arbitrary definition to exclude all older recipes so you can 1st.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                no it wouldn't
                in fact its what makes Culinaly good

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It's not a bread, tho. It's a really shitty cake with fricking "pumpkin spice" in it. It doesn't even taste of banana. Those Panamanian thingies my neighbour made were delicious and golden and so banana-y. American banana bread is an unpleasant brown colour and an unappetising shade of beige on the inside. Truly vile

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >It doesn't count... nothing made before ours count... so we are first.
                Wasn't this how Americans/English invented the first computer?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You are not very smart.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Not need to get angry, ignoring older cases is a very traditional American way of inventing stuff, I'd guess more than half American inventions fall under this.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Not very smart at all.

                No. Americans have access to Caribbean and Latin American food, and obviously our own. Banana cakes are not even close to American banana bread. Euros looking at images on the internet have no reference and are desperately trying to be right despite being proved wrong, with sources, again and again.

                I disagree. The only difference between American banana bread and actually good banana cakes is the inclusion of spices in banana bread and the fact that banana bread is invariably drier than a nun's c**t.
                They're otherwise not very different at all.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >They're otherwise not very different at all.
                One was invented by an American, the other was not, how can you say they are not completely different?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You keep popping up saying nothing useful. Whether you like American banana bread is completely irrelevant. The topic is whether it's American, and all proven sources provided have shown that it is.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Just as the other guy, your are also not very smart. You two should get together and go bowling.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Central American colonies had cities with milk, eggs and flour for a century before the first US cities were founded
                Good point! Except the oldest city in the US is St Augustine. 1560s. The first euro settlement in the new world altogether is... I forget... something in some island, but I know the first in South America is coastal Venezuela. 1501, iinm. That's only sixty years, not a hundred! But this ties into my post

                When did I mention bananas, kiddo?
                [...]
                I used to have a Panamanian couple as neighbours back home in yurp and the wife made these delicious little banana cakes from wheat flour and some type of corn flour that is NOT cornmeal. They were fantastic. I strongly dislike American banana bread because those were the first banana cakes I'd ever had and banana bread is dry and weird-tasting in comparison.

                and those Panamanian banana cakes because the first euro settlement in Central America was Panama in 1510. Of course, none of this is relevant when you take into consideration that bananas were not become a common fruit until the 1870s and were prior to that relegated almost exclusively to Southeast Asia as well as the places Portugal brought them to for cultivation (Brazil, the Azores, various parts of Africa and India).

                https://i.imgur.com/H6lCFEr.jpg

                Yeah

                [...]
                >I used to have a Panamanian couple as neighbours back home in yurp and the wife made these delicious little banana cakes from wheat flour and some type of corn flour that is NOT cornmeal. They were fantastic. I strongly dislike American banana bread because those were the first banana cakes I'd ever had and banana bread is dry and weird-tasting in comparison.
                Seems like "banana bread" is not a bread made with or of bananas, but an oddly specific US recipe.

                It's not a bread at all but a very very shitty cake

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >It's not a bread at all but a very very shitty cake
                I got it, if others made it first, it doesn't count, got it.

                https://i.imgur.com/BiFGBT0.jpg

                The first wheat crop in the Americas was grown in Mexico by a black man named Juan Garrido in 1525. He was a west African who grew up in Portugal, and became a conquistador. He was also likely the first black person to set foot in America.
                JUAN GARRIDO!

                Are you really trying to go full kang and say the US is a not a later colony? Central America had wheat VERY early one, Christians need it to take part communion.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                For BANANA BREAD, which is the topic of discussion, milk is necessary you fricking spaz. You look like a complete moron trying to correct me without understanding what is being discussed (more like me lecturing a moronic Euro).

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Central Americans had milk for more than a century before US had a city.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Still no source on Latin America making banana bread. I win until you post a source proving banana bread was made first somewhere other than America. I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :).

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >America. I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :). I win :).
                It's so tiresome.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                The first wheat crop in the Americas was grown in Mexico by a black man named Juan Garrido in 1525. He was a west African who grew up in Portugal, and became a conquistador. He was also likely the first black person to set foot in America.
                JUAN GARRIDO!

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Sure, and I've seen Irish people cook with miso paste. Doesn't make it native there.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Pit style BBQ by using indirect heat is uniquely American. You're just straight up factually wrong because you use BBQ interchangeably for other words like grilling due to your ignorance.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Cooking meat is a pit with fire is AMERICAN
                Lol now, this is literally older than cooking stuff inside pans.

                I'm sorry but you've never had real american bbq and only have a narrow understanding of it. As for the root beer I looked it up and only got some conflicting results about it's legality, but it's well known that it's very much an american thing, the only other countries that make it are canada and australia

                >If it was not NUMBER ONE, then it was not real American
                It was good, but not as good as other barbecues, maybe you guys need some time to refine the oldest recipe in the world.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Ok so you're continuing to feign Illiteracy and argue with strawmen. Enjoy your last (You)

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Americans invented the use of fire in pits to cook meat
                This cannot be real.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Americans invented using a two pit system where the smoke is funneled from one pit to another to cook meat low and slow. Ignorant moron.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Americans invented BBQ
                >Americans invented pit BBQ
                >Americans invented using a two pit system where the smoke is funneled from one pit to another to cook meat low and slow. Ignorant moron.
                Don't you get tired of being shown to be wrong?

                Yes. Korea is only one generation ahead of arab oil states in being beverly hillbillies

                At least unlike Israelis, their language was not created after WW2.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                That's not what Anon means.

                Pit style BBQ by using indirect heat is uniquely American. You're just straight up factually wrong because you use BBQ interchangeably for other words like grilling due to your ignorance.

                Better definition and very accurate.

                Traditional Texas barbecue doesn't use sauce. It's just smoky and moist as all frick meats. Has its roots in German tradition. When done correctly no sauce is used or required. Brisket just melts in your mouth like some Japanese wagyu.

                Doesn't it get mopped, though? Or have I been doing it wrong? I mean, I've been doing it wrong because I barbecue pork breast or shoulder rather than beef brisket because I detest the taste of smoked beef. But I mop it with a thin sauce I make, too.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >That's not what Anon means.
                Then he should be more clear, it's hard to read "BBQ is unique to America. Saying otherwise is just straight up ignorant." and understand he's talking of a very niche and strange form of barbecue.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                See

                >Americans invented cooking meat with fire
                No, I don't think anon is. There is something different about American barbecue but as an absolute novice to the style (and not being from the US originally) I can't quite articulate what, exactly, sets it apart but when the other anon above said that it was cooked indirectly, that's part of it. Typically, barbecue isn't cooked over fire directly but rather, it's cooked by the heat of its smoke. My barbecue has the fire in a separate box next to where the meat goes. The smoke it creates billows into the main chamber through a flue and the fire gets fed new bits of wood every now and again to keep it going. A second flue and the chimney help control the temperature and the rate of smoke going into the main chamber.
                It's not quite cold smoking, like we do in my home country and not hot smoking like they do in Asia. It's a different technique and I would agree with the Americans that said technique is uniquely theirs.

                This is what the fatties mean when they say that barbecue is uniquely theirs. Hopefully someone can explain it in even more depth than I can.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >be european
                >be illiterate

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Not the other anon but it makes sense why they only sell fooditems that have a shelflife of a few months and not other shit like what you linked. So snacks and drinks it is.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                If we're limiting it too non-refrigerated snack/junk food stuff
                >Root beer (maybe that's a little -too- american and wouldn't sell)
                >more salty snacks (chex mix, pringles etc)
                >meat snacks (beef jerkey, slim jims, pickled sausage)
                >sauces (a couple different bbq and hot sauces, maybe some salsa)

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'd say that some of these are not legal due to laws on additives (like root beer), or are not typically American (like sauces)

                >American barbecue is sub-par
                You've either never been to America or you got BBQ in frickin NYC or something.

                It's not bad, but Brazilians, Argentinians, Uruguayans, Turks, Greeks... all do it better.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm sorry but you've never had real american bbq and only have a narrow understanding of it. As for the root beer I looked it up and only got some conflicting results about it's legality, but it's well known that it's very much an american thing, the only other countries that make it are canada and australia

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Most of these already get sold overseas but even then we go back to what started this conversation

                I've seen all the candy before, but as an American all the chips, pop corn, and pancake stuff are all a weird brand I've never seen. I'd say half that shelf isn't a brand that is sold in America.

                Also, why is it all just chips and candy?

                and then

                >Also, why is it all just chips and candy?
                What else could be put here?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                mf JAZZ IT UP WITH ZATARAINS

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Big newer thing I haven’t seen yet is the “knockoff” Girl Scout cookies made by Keebler (I say “knockoff” because Keebler is one producers of the actual GSC’s and they’re shitheels for selling the knockoffs below what they charge the kids).

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Don't shittalk the company, profit is the reason the country exists.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You're a complete dipshit.

            This is the snack aisle of the supermarket.

            OP said it was the "American isle".

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              He said it was the american "section". If you look left you can see other snacks and chocolate. It is obviously a small shelf reserved for american snacks in an aisle reserved for snacks in general.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >in an aisle reserved for snacks in general.
                It's mostly snacks because it's an American island, not because it's part of a larger snack aisle.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Aisle vs isle
                Uhhhhh look up the difference anon.
                If you look at the bottom left you can see a snickers and we've had those for decades.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >If you look at the bottom left you can see a snickers and we've had those for decades.
                The funniest thing to me about these "American sections" is that they don't include all the American brands that have been around in Europe for a long time. They don't even notice, they get exports of all our most popular brands with global appeal and eat them all regularly and love them, then they saunter over to the "American section" where only the unpopular trash ends up and think, "Wow, American products are so bad!" without stopping to consider all the American products they consume and enjoy daily thanks to American imperialism.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >The funniest thing to me about these "American sections" is that they don't include all the American brands that have been around in Europe for a long time.
                They often include American produced products, these are usually different from same brand on Europe.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                That makes the cereal, mac&cheese and pancake mix/maple syrup seem out of place then but whatever.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I understand but
                >cereal
                Sweet and sugary
                >Mac and cheese
                Idk tbh, probs couldn't put it with the regular pasta boxes if it's 3 times as expensive
                >maple syrup
                surprises me as well, I've travelled across yurop and most places had maple syrup. Probs placed it there for similar reasons as macncheese.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >maple syrup
                >surprises me as well, I've travelled across yurop and most places had maple syrup. Probs placed it there for similar reasons as macncheese.
                I thought it was corn syrup.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Lmao, I looked at the pic a few times but never noticed that. Yea, if they do sell something for pancakes its usually caramelized sugar syrup or maple syrup not corn syrup.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            It looks like a Japanese, Mexican, or "Foreign" section in America really.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        SLOBBY JOE

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          every european should be tied to a chair like this and forced to eat 4-7 sloppy joes followed with neurological studies

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is the snack aisle of the supermarket.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >half that shelf isn't a brand that is sold in America.
      See

      I think Herr's is regional so someone in, say, California wouldn't know what that is and I've never seen Soundy anything before nor Magic Time popcorn.
      t. Euro in Ameriland

      Also, Pearl Milling has different names throughout the US like how Best and Hellmann's are both the same thing.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        pearl milling is former aunt jemimah if I'm not mistaken. had to drop the 'uncle' in uncle Ben's too

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      See

      I’m honestly surprised to see Herr’s chips there. That brand is very regional to Pennsylvania and some surrounding states. They definitely are commonplace here, but not so much the rest of the country.

      Herr’s is a US brand of chips from Nottingham, PA, a bit outside of Philly and just before Maryland. Not nationally sold, but is featured many times in the US version of The Office.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Accurate how? The candies do exist in American grocery stores as well. But this looks more like what you find in the check out impulse buy aisle than in the rest of the store. Pic is a part of the chocolate and candy section in a grocery store in America

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Most of it is stuff we have here, those jalapeño puffs are good way better than cheetos. No idea what that drink? In the bottom right is and I've never seen that brand of popcorn. Overall seems like an odd selection though, of all the cereals out there why 2 kinds of cinnamon toast crunch? a ton of candy too, you'd think there would be more salty stuff

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Those jalapeño cheese curls are good.
    t. American

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Very high sugar cereal
    >cheddar
    >corn syrup
    >cheetos-like snacks
    >peanut butter
    >candy
    >soda
    Seems pretty accurate.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe a fifth of this stuff I've never seen before
    The rest is stuff I haven't eaten since I was in middle, maybe elementary school
    I'd like to say its a shame that America is only accurately represented through candy, but I can't day its wrong either

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's fine we eat whatever we want, you could put surstrommung there and it wouldn't matter

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I think Herr's is regional so someone in, say, California wouldn't know what that is and I've never seen Soundy anything before nor Magic Time popcorn.
    t. Euro in Ameriland

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yea the other guy is moronic but what do you expect supermarkets to sell aside from this lmao.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    OK fellow patriots this is now an American grocery thread. Post pics of American grocery aisles so OP can gauge the accuracy of his American aisle.

    I'll go first. This is a small section of the snack aisle

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      And some "healthier" snacks. Still junk food but you know, baked, pita chips, shit like that. I love those little pita niqqas like you wouldn't believe

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/Ja7XCTh.jpg

      And some "healthier" snacks. Still junk food but you know, baked, pita chips, shit like that. I love those little pita niqqas like you wouldn't believe

      Looks like every single supermarket I've ever seen.

      Banana bread. Which is the first food on the list I gave you, dipshit.

      >Banana bread is American
      It was eaten in central and south america for centuries before the US was created.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >It was eaten in central and south america for centuries before the US was created

        Just straight up false, moron. I'm done taking to you since you're both stupid, and make shit up. How the frick were central and south Americans making banana bread without flour and milk you fricking moron? Banana bread was invented in the United States in the 1870s. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana_bread

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Reddit space
          >Mobile user
          >The first US banana bread was made in 1870, this shows the first banana bread was made in the US.
          Wow, just wow, do you know that people in lots of Hispanic countries have been eating patacons for centuries before this, right?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Are you moronic? Patacons are not bread, and definitely not Banana bread. They're not even close.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Unless "banana bread" refers to an extremely specific recipe in the US banana bread is old as bananas.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Do you know what bread is Black person?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      euros don't have full sized grocery stores so they can't comprehend, they think Americans grocery shop at 7-11

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >euros don't have full sized grocery stores so they can't comprehend
        Hard to see if this is irony or ignorance.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          its not
          your "shops" are North Korea tier

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you need to lie this much to be better than others, it's a clear sight you're not better.

            Sure, and I've seen Irish people cook with miso paste. Doesn't make it native there.

            >Ok, others do it, but it's our...
            The US is a relative new colony, it's probably older colonies did this before newer ones.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >our
              Not American, kiddo. I'm

              >Americans invented cooking meat with fire
              No, I don't think anon is. There is something different about American barbecue but as an absolute novice to the style (and not being from the US originally) I can't quite articulate what, exactly, sets it apart but when the other anon above said that it was cooked indirectly, that's part of it. Typically, barbecue isn't cooked over fire directly but rather, it's cooked by the heat of its smoke. My barbecue has the fire in a separate box next to where the meat goes. The smoke it creates billows into the main chamber through a flue and the fire gets fed new bits of wood every now and again to keep it going. A second flue and the chimney help control the temperature and the rate of smoke going into the main chamber.
              It's not quite cold smoking, like we do in my home country and not hot smoking like they do in Asia. It's a different technique and I would agree with the Americans that said technique is uniquely theirs.

              Did you miss the part where I said
              >It's not quite cold smoking, like we do IN MY HOME COUNTRY
              ?
              Because you seem to keep operating on the belief that I'm American despite making it very clear from the jump that I, in fact, am not.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                This doesn't change the facts that older colonies probably did all the basic stuff, like banana before later colonies.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                When did I mention bananas, kiddo?

                >How does other parts being colonized before make patacons magically transform into bread?
                Being European colonies means they had milk, flour and eggs; pretty hard to see no one making banana bread until some American decided to make it in 1870, specially when I know some banana cakes from here that are very closer to banana bread and centuries older than this.

                I used to have a Panamanian couple as neighbours back home in yurp and the wife made these delicious little banana cakes from wheat flour and some type of corn flour that is NOT cornmeal. They were fantastic. I strongly dislike American banana bread because those were the first banana cakes I'd ever had and banana bread is dry and weird-tasting in comparison.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >probably older colonies did
              Considering how much child raping priests wrote about what they saw in Central and South America, you'd think at least one would have written about offset smokers before the latter 1800s when they were first used in Oklahoma. I mean... they documented how the Taíno and Caribe used pimento wood to cook meat (the predecessor to Jamaican jerk). So they'd certainly document something like an offset smoker.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >They cannot make it first... because... they are subhumans.
                Central America was considerably more developed than the US until mid 1800s.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              its not a lie though
              our grocery store are larger than some euro countries

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Stores are similar sized, a few Americans being really large. If you want the US version to be larger, we just need to compare the locked sector.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous
              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah

                When did I mention bananas, kiddo?
                [...]
                I used to have a Panamanian couple as neighbours back home in yurp and the wife made these delicious little banana cakes from wheat flour and some type of corn flour that is NOT cornmeal. They were fantastic. I strongly dislike American banana bread because those were the first banana cakes I'd ever had and banana bread is dry and weird-tasting in comparison.

                >I used to have a Panamanian couple as neighbours back home in yurp and the wife made these delicious little banana cakes from wheat flour and some type of corn flour that is NOT cornmeal. They were fantastic. I strongly dislike American banana bread because those were the first banana cakes I'd ever had and banana bread is dry and weird-tasting in comparison.
                Seems like "banana bread" is not a bread made with or of bananas, but an oddly specific US recipe.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >doesn't even have a cheese ball department
                ngmi

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Amazing, does it also have meatclowns?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                those aren't American believe it or not

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            anon are you stupid, I live in the US but ASDA and Aldi (in the UK at least) are basically identical to a good ol Kroger. US stores are maybe ~20% bigger on the high end, but if you compare them store to store I'm certain there's a lot of overlap.

            Costco on the other hand would probably knock a Euro's socks off. And yes I know there's like one each in the UK, Spain, and France, but they're basically unicorns across the pond

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >I live in the US but ASDA and Aldi (in the UK at least) are basically identical to a good ol Kroger. US stores are maybe ~20% bigger on the high end, but if you compare them store to store I'm certain there's a lot of overlap.
              I can tell you right now that it depends on the site and the expected footfall. Busier stores with a suitable site will be larger.
              Land plots zoned for supermarkets tend to be larger in the US as land is mostly cheaper.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >as land is mostly cheaper.
                Land may not be cheaper, but in the US you can build stuff in the middle of nowhere, where land is cheaper and people will go there to shop.

                Broa de milho dates to the 19th century.

                >I just made up a lie... so... this is now real
                Are you a troony?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Aldi in the us is very different from Kroger in the us. Super limited fresh stuff. Meat, veg, etc. Kroger got everything. Thats so odd. Do you also have to out a dabloon or w.e in for a shopping cart to release at your Aldis?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You do know that both Aldi and Lidl originated in Europe and can be found all over the US, right?

          t. American

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Man, what is it about American bbq that always drives at least 1 yuro into such an assmad frenzy?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I think it's the kang element of trying to claim something everyone did for millennia, and many do better is "uniquely American". Americans are like #4 when it comes to barbecue in the continent.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Bbq is american because they prepare meat differently over a fire
      >They add different sauces and herbs
      Noone is getting mad except delusional americans thoughbeit.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Bbq is american because they prepare meat differently over a fire
        It's not even that meat is prepared in a different manner, but that the sauces added to overwrite the flavor of the meat are a somehow unique.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Funnier how the sauces aren't even a thing used all round

          Traditional Texas barbecue doesn't use sauce. It's just smoky and moist as all frick meats. Has its roots in German tradition. When done correctly no sauce is used or required. Brisket just melts in your mouth like some Japanese wagyu.

          so what is the actual difference between murican bbq and others lol.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Barbecue with sauce is still a bit unique because of the sauce, barbecue without sauce done in the US is identical to many others, hell it's literally the same other once-Mexican places have.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              They used sauces before, your own museums say it and it makes sense to marinate/rub something in a bit y know.
              >The first sauce they made was very simple. In 1698, a Dominican missionary named Père Labat visited the French West Indies and witnessed cooks using lime juice and hot peppers to season barbecued meat.
              >This sauce probably had its roots in Africa where cooks traditionally used both lemon and lime juice.
              The sauce concoction you guys make from vinegar might be a regional thing but come on now, it does not make bbq unique to america

              You already got a list with every single American food known to man. What more could we possibly give you?
              [...]
              BBQ is unique to America. Saying otherwise is just straight up ignorant.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >it does not make bbq unique to america
                Americans see barbecue the same way Latin Americans see Dragon Ball Z, it's so popular most people act as if it was invented locally and is an exclusivity.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Didn't know mexicans do that but lmao that would be funny af.
                I like american bbq too but come on mano eyy

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Didn't know mexicans do that but lmao that would be funny af.
                Yeah, I think it's not as bad as Brazilians, but it's a local staple.

                Personally, I prefer the stuff Argentinians added to their meat, it makes the meat taste more meaty, instead of sweet, citric or acid.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >so what is the actual difference between murican bbq and others lol.
            The difference is that American barbecue is American, while others are not.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Idk what one of those other anons was talking about, but "American" barbecue doesn't make sense. At most it's a state by state thing but even then varies by cities and regions. So the most popular and well known ones are probably Central Texas, Kansas city, Memphis, and the Carolinas barbecue cuisines.

            They all have sauces in their barbecue cuisines, but like I said earlier in Texas ideally it shouldn't need sauce. That's sort of the hallmark of Texas style and the signature meat is beef brisket often with little to no seasoning, focusing more on the long smoking and type of wood. Pork is the signature meat in Memphis and the Carolinas. Memphis focuses on dry rubs, while Carolinas use a mustard based sauce. Kansas city is much more broad, using all kinds of smoked meats and with a ketchup and molasses based sauce.

            In addition to these there are other less popular barbecues like Southern barbecue in Alabama and Georgia.

            In short, American barbecue goes by cities and states, and each has its signature style. If you asked a random person in the US they would probably prefer either Texas or Kansas city barbecue and I would agree these two would be considered the best of all the barbecue varieties.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >In short, American barbecue goes by cities and states, and each has its signature style.
              This goes for pretty much all of mankind. The issue is acting as if only Americans had this local variety.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Ok moron so all cooked meat across the globe is literally exactly the same thing? That's your argument at this point. Your obsessed asspain has backed you into a corner so you're just screeching nonsense now

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Ok moron so all cooked meat across the globe is literally exactly the same thing?
          Except for some changes on the sauce added (if a sauce is added)? Yes.

          Trying to claim what's perhaps the most universal dish as yours is the peak of kanging.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >BBQ IS UNIQUELY AMERICAN
          >no it isn't
          >OH SO EVERY OTHER FOOD IS THE SAME??? IS THAT IT
          No one said difference isn't allowed, we just said you aren't unique for bbqing lmao. What a way to strawman.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    American food is just other cultures food improved.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Keep telling yourself that, maybe you'll believe your own propaganda one day and be happy.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >this thread again
    The foods represented here are only the things you can't/wouldn't usually get in that area. We don't eat nothing but pop tarts, but you don't eat any poptarts

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Accurate to what?
    Yes, those foods are all made in America. At least, I think so. I've never heard of Herr's, MagicTime, or Pearl Milling Company, or Soundy brands in my life but maybe they're regional to California or something.
    No, I don't eat any of them because they're all trash. Even of the types of items available we have so many better options for most of what's presented here. Like why is there Reese's brand peanut butter? I've never seen someone buy that shit, where's the Jif or Peter Pan or even Skippy? Those are the peanut butter brands we ACTUALLY eat. I guess the candy selection is fine, it's got pretty good representation of things that are actually popular here.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I too have never heard of Herrs or magic time, but pearl milling is the rebrand of aunt jemima which I'm sure you have heard of

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oh, I've definitely heard of Aunt Jemima. I knew they got rid of Aunt Jemima's face but I didn't know they changed the name entirely. I haven't looked at pancake mix or fake syrup in years.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >aunt jemima
        I miss her.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    more like a Mexican section

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >0.1% of our grocery stores
    uhhh I guess that's a start

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Magic Time
    >Pearl Milling Company
    >Soundy
    >Repp
    I've seen everything on that shelf except for these brands.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the only thing there I consider Americana food is kraft macaroni, maple flavored corn syrup, and maybe the arizona tea.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You can claim there are other typical American products, but everything here is typically American.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm talking food that seems relatively uniquely American. a dozen candies and sugary cereals aren't uniquely American.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not exactly. I along with my other American friends ITT are confused by two brands. Herrs and magic time.

        Herrs is apparently a northeastern regional brand and not a very popular one. So only a small fraction of the population would have ever heard of this. Magic time is.... I'm not sure. Here's their website
        >https://www.magictimefoods.online/
        There's no information or address. I'm not sure if it's even American.

        Pic related is a few recognizable popcorn brands. Orville redenbacher is in every major grocery store. Pop secret and act II can be found even in gas stations.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Magic time is.... I'm not sure. Here's their website
          ://www.magictimefoods.online/
          >There's no information or address. I'm not sure if it's even American.
          I think I remember seeing these nearby US occupation bases in Germany, but it has been many years. Still the name sounds familiar.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah so I guess it's in Florida but they definitely do not sell anything in Florida. I have never once seen this in a Publix or Winn dixie or ingles. Hardly any followers too.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Must be. I've never seen Herr's while in the US. Only in convenience stores in Asia and Australia. Always owned by Indians. Maybe it's popular in India so they assume it's the most popular everywhere? Idk
            What I do know is these shitty daily threads where two anons keep fighting over nonsense and calling each other morons seems inorganic and bot-like.
            So now I just hide those threads with 100+ replies of pointless arguing.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Herr's is pretty good. It's just that it grows less common the farther away from Pennsylvania you get, like how no one gives half a frick about Faygo once you get away from Michigan

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                That's interesting, because these same stores selling Herr's, also sell Faygo. Nobody ever buys any of this crap here, yet these stores are completely full of this stuff, at twice the price of actual popular brands like Lays or Coke. Why do these indian convenience store guys think Aussies would pay double for Faygo when Coke Pepsi etc exist? Faygo is popular because it's cheap trash food. I really think these convenience stores are owned by Indian-Americans who think all white people globally love Faygo for some reason.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >not a very popular one
          It's literally the #1 brand in Delaware. : )

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Delaware isn't a state it's a tax haven for corporations. I hope all of you 1 million of you delawareans enjoy your Herrs. Me and my small city of 2 million will just have to snack on something else.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >Delaware isn't a state it's a tax haven for corporations
              Also for us! We have no sales tax, very low property tax and if you win a prize here (lotto, casino etc), you can remain anonymous when you collect it.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                S-shut up!

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    In the health food section maybe

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's kind of like a checkout aisle

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pic related is popular in America. Literally all 330 million people eat this every day. They can't get enough of it because if you eat this you instantly become based. Start stocking this on your shelves if you wanna be based too

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Churros are mexican

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Totally wrong. No guns.
    I just got a new pistol at the grocery store and an assault rifle at the gas station.

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I’m honestly surprised to see Herr’s chips there. That brand is very regional to Pennsylvania and some surrounding states. They definitely are commonplace here, but not so much the rest of the country.

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Are they still on the banana shit?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This pointless schizo argument just never ends

  28. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    takis and 'zona teas make up like 50% of my weekly groceries so very accurate I'd say

  29. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    ITT: Europeans continue to constantly think about americans every waking hour.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe people don't like you lying?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not sure how it's a lie, I see a couple Europeans constantly thinking about america every waking hour. Also some massive autism about banana bread. This is just pathetic.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Someone implies the US is not as great as in myths, it can be something as small as not inventing a niche recipe, and suddenly it all begins.

          There was something like this a couple of days ago when someone mention US laws allow sweeteners to be put on milk.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Not a single person is arguing about "US greatness". All we're asking is for one singular source that shows banana bread was first invented outside of America. Or just admit it was.

  30. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    We don't need to invent new foods. We take what everyone else has and improve upon it. No idea about banana bread though.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'd not call adding sugar and fat an improvement, but to each his own.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        but sugar and fat are great, I use one or both in all of my cooking.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You can never have too much of these two.

  31. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What a thread. It has a "The joke's on you I'm only pretending to be a European moron" quality to it.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      just imagine how big their husbands white wieners must be

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Seething began with americans claiming bbq was uniquely american
      lmao

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm starting to believe it's always the same guy that starts to seething about "how dare you say the US has something bad", these threads always go the same way.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Ehh its just monkey behaviour but it wouldn't surprise me. You have dedicated schizo anons who make japan : 0 threads , hot sauce threads, fricking wienertail threads and much more. Some want to bait their fellow countrymen so why not I guess.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            No, I believe the guy defending the US is the sameshizo, his style is identical to the milk thread including the "I win I win" spam.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Could be honestly, like I suddenly realized here

              Lol, just as I posted I noticed the postercount. Fricking hell it must've been at least just 7 different dudes going back and forth.

              i remember some schizos on Culinaly who had been posting nonstop for over 30 hours in some threads.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Maybe someday I'll make a thread I know he'll be attracted and mention banana bread and milk, see how it goes.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Still no source.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous
        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Lol, just as I posted I noticed the postercount. Fricking hell it must've been at least just 7 different dudes going back and forth.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Or two guys replying to each other with an ocasional other posting in between.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        What's a non-US equivalent?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          There are not many, most people are either pretty old, have invented a few things and don't need to kang.

          But Koreans and Israelis are like this on turbo.

  32. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >sour candies and pop rocks
    It's like a time capsule of America early 90s

  33. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Needs salsa, doughnut sprinkles, taco kit, popcorn and kraft

  34. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the thumbnail for op's pic looks like every single fake deli that sells chinese disposable vapes, it's just missing the 13 year old pakistani kid working the cash register yelling at the mexican guy who's making all the samdwiches

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That's clearly the Black person section

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    needs more oreos and lays

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Given that bananas/plantains are native to Indonesia and have been known in various forms in India, Africa and so on since something like 1000 BC why are you morons arguing about when the new world colonies got milk and flour? Seems far more likely something like it would have appeared from east asia or africa first. Hell 10 seconds on google tells you they were eating them in the 600s in the Middle East.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Doesn't matter, Americans invented it, I win 🙂

  38. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They are missing the mashmellow cream.

  39. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Great bait thread. Classic. Ignorant Americans waddling in, acting obnoxious and arrogant.

  40. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    this selection frickin rules. the "american" section in australian stores is marshmellow fluff and various tinned pie mixes.

  41. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >11
    Digits
    That's a very tiny section though. It's part of what we have here, but not very true to the experience of having anything you want either.

  42. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I always thought those things in the bottom left were japanese

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Arizona?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah

  43. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Cereal
    I don't think the Churros one is anything special but anyone will recognize Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Reese's Puffs
    >Microwave Popcorn
    good
    >Kraft Mac and Cheese
    good
    >Pancake mix and syrup
    good but it's the gay brand that changed their name because muh racism (was Aunt Jemima, very popular)
    >Herr's snacks
    They exist but Herr's is low tier compared to Frito-Lay
    >Sour Patch kids
    good
    >Soundy
    never heard of it. Maybe it's a knock off of Pop Rocks?
    >Reese's Peanut Butter
    okay but Jif would be better
    >other candy
    seems good. I'm a fan of the Reese's ones
    >Arizona
    good
    >Repp energy drink
    never heard of it. But you probably already have Monster, Rockstar, Red Bull, etc
    >Tajin
    okay but more for mexicans

  44. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    is that fricking tajin?

  45. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A lot of that selection is garbage that most Americans don't eat. Looks like they just got a good vendor deal on some of those items.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I do not think there is something too trashy for Americans to eat.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I guess but that doesn't change the fact that the poor aisle has a lot of knock off weirdo brands no American but a poor black 9 year old would eat from a Dollar General, since there are no other food options within 15 square miles, aside from the liquor store, and McDs. Can also sub 13 year old white trash ICP fan.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Having some high goods, some mid goods and some low goods is a good way to have a broader US section, isn't it?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, I suppose. If I'm shopping in an import aisle tho, I expect the top tier most popular imports. Not just something that was once sold in a country that's probably an import to that country, anyway. If I'm shopping burgerland I don't want some cheese doodle produced in Peru. I want cheetos.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >If I'm shopping in an import aisle tho, I expect the top tier most popular imports.
              Personally I prefer a broad selection of products in a foreign section, more on the exotic side than on high quality.

              Other section can have the high end goods.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          But Herr's is actually very good, it's just regional. Their tomato soup and grilled cheese flavoured cheese curls are absolute breasts

  46. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Reeses brand peanut butter
    As an American, I've never seen that before in my life. But they get points for having peanut butter nonetheless.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      In America, it's strongly preferred by Asians, especially Indonesians, for some reason. I see it sold everywhere but it's literally the only brand sold in any of the Asian supermarkets in my area. Maybe it's because it's sweetened, idk (never had it). I make pecel using whatever brand is cheapest when I go to the supermarket. Most recently, I got a couple jars of Peter Pan for a buck each as well as Safeway's ownbrand so that's what I use but SEAmonkeys will gladly pay seven times that for Reese's.

  47. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    10/10 makes me feel like I'm really in a Dollar General, or a Dollar Tree, or Family Dollar.

  48. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't eat Herr's. I eat Utz.

  49. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why is it so colourful in a tacky way?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's meant to attract children's eyes.

  50. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    That's nice, dear. Still doesn't mean they made cornbread or cornpone (because they didn't and if they'd had, it would be documented because, unlike the New World tribes, we had the written word at the time).
    I guess you could say that you've been poned on this one, especially since you conceded that Central American breads based on maize are irrelevant to the current direction of the conversation (or you would have otherwise pressed on that point).

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Since you conceded that Central American breads based on maize are irrelevant to the current direction of the conversation (or you would have otherwise pressed on that point).
      They are relevant, but it's impossible to say who made this first, the civilization in today's Mexico or the natives in the north.

      Now, on modern cornbread, it goes for Spain as it was already a typical peasant staple there before corn become common in England.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Mesoamerica didn't know what leavening was before the Spaniards and did not use untreated cornmeal at all ergo it is entirely impossible for them to have developed cornbread at any point prior to the Algonquins QED

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Mesoamerica didn't know what leavening was before
          I mean, i expect Americans to pretend everyone else is primitive, but this is plain lying.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not remotely. Chemical leavening is an Algonquin invention. Even Europeans didn't have it before contact. Mesoamerica had no contact with any culture as far north or east as the Chesapeake and had no knowledge of yeast leavening ergo, they didn't have any leavened food prior to cocol which, again, is post-contact with the Spaniards

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Chemical leavening
              Maybe it's a language barrier, but isn't leavening the process of beating the dough so it can grow? This, ovens and grinding is all that is needed to make cornbread.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No, chemical leavening is mixing an acid and a base that produce a gas that cause bubbles to form, as opposed to using yeast to produce gas

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Sorry for understanding it wrong, mate. But you don't need this process to make cornbread, tho.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You also need flour and wheat's not from America
                Cornbread was invented in the American colonies
                >inb4 the US is not the colonies
                Just about every country in the world is newer than post-American Revolution United States, but nobody says that France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, etc. aren't the inventors of their famous foods
                Also I'm NTA I'm

                Chuckwagon chili, Cincinnati chili, hot tamales, Denver chili, ambrosia salad, buffalo wings, pecan pie, corn dogs, chocolate chip cookies, ranch dressing, tater tots, peanut butter, gumbo, cobbler, brownies, bubble gum, marshmallow, root beer, sassafras, sarsaparilla, cola, American cheese and Velveeta, johnny cakes, corn bread, pone, banana pudding, corn nuts, pecan rolls, fried chicken, hot sauce, white barbecue, chimichangas, root beer floats, jambalaya, basically all instant cereal, chicken fried steak, hot chicken I don't have all day

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Cornbread was invented in the American colonies
                Spain (and a few other European countries), and Spanish colonies had cornbread far before the first settlement in original US territory began.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                As has been detailed already, that is false and making the claim again despite it being debunked thoroughly is disingenuous.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I thought you were talking about corn bread, not corn bread (US special definition). haha

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Unless hotdogs are ham, there are no other cornbreads that predate even American cornbread and especially not pone.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I'm sure they put corn in bread, that's not the same as cornbread which is made with chemical leavening, cornbread is colonial American
                Oh chowder, chowder's American, too

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I already got it, if we only count corn bread if it follow some narrow made up limitations, then yeah, the US invented cornbread*

                Unless hotdogs are ham, there are no other cornbreads that predate even American cornbread and especially not pone.

                >there are no other cornbreads that predate even American cornbread and especially not pone.
                Again, I agree with you as long as we purposefully narrow what "cornbread" means to exclude everything before the American version.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No need for a purposefully narrow definition where there are no other definitions unless hotdogs are ham

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >hotdogs and ham... so... cornbread narrow definition is actually broad.
                Sorry mate, but unless we play some mental gymnastics, bread made with corn is cornbread... even if someone dared to make it before Americans.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No bread made from corn predates pone.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                This is more like the annoying common attempt to claim Americans invented sausages, because "only hot dog sausages count, all that came before must be fake".

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >But you don't need this process to make cornbread, tho.
                That is literally the defining characteristic that makes pone pone and not polenta or corn porridge.

                >Chemical leavening
                Maybe it's a language barrier, but isn't leavening the process of beating the dough so it can grow? This, ovens and grinding is all that is needed to make cornbread.

                >language barrier
                English isn't even my second language (it's my fourth or fifth, depending on whether you consider dialects languages in their own right) and I can have discussions in English just fine. Don't use that as an excuse

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >That is literally the defining characteristic that makes pone pone and not polenta or corn porridge.
                I got it, you're using some "specially made for the US to be #1" definition, kek. Guess Americans were the first to make "corn bread according to American definition".

                It's the moon landing all again.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                False. This is not an American definition and I am not from America.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >False, cornbread only count if it's the way Americans made it
                Lol no, using cornflour to cook make bread following a wheat recipe is corn bread, unless you're trying to kang.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                False attribution. Disingenuous argument. No point made.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What a cute pile of buzzword, but unless we are playing a game of American revisionism, the bread made of corn lots of people made before Americans is cornbread honey.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >American revisionism
                I am not from America. Disingenuous argument as had been established that no bread made from corn predates even cornbread and especially not pone.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >If bread made of corn is not "real corn bread", then Americans are first
                Now, if bread made of corn is cornbread, then Americans are not first, tard.

                No bread made from corn predates pone.

                You can make flour with bread, then make bread from this flour... even if for some reason it cannot count as cornbread, kek.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No bread made of corn predates pone.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Repeating a lie a few times does not make a truth, bread made of corn was a staple in Europe and Spanish colonies before the first English sat foot in modern day US.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Repeating a lie a few times does not make a truth
                Exactly.
                >bread made of corn was a staple in Europe and Spanish colonies before the first English sat foot in modern day US.
                Prove it

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >No one EVER grinned corn and made bread with it before late 1700s... this is a FACT...
                So you make an obvious fake claim, demand everyone to accept it as true and say it's true unless someone can convince you it's not? I guess you're a schizo mate.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Evidence of pone dates to about 700ad, not 1700.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Ahhh, you're saying natives did cornbread before the mutts (colonial Americans), this is true.

                But many others made modern cornbread before the mutts, this is also true.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >But many others made modern cornbread before the mutts, this is also true.
                That is false. Were it true, there would be cornbreads commonly eaten in places other than the US, India and, oddly, Serbia.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Were it true, there would be cornbreads commonly eaten in places other than the US, India and, oddly, Serbia.
                There are cornbreads commonly eaten in places other than the US, India and, oddly, Serbia... notably in Spain, Portugal, Italy, France, every single Spanish colony, every single Portuguese colony (India has it because of Goa)...

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >India has it because of Goa
                False. Indian cornbread, makka ki roti, is from the far northwest, where the Portuguese never set foot.
                Do not lie.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Corn was introduced in India by the Portuguese, tard. Even if you're ignorant and only know about northwest's Indian cornbread...

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >northwest's Indian cornbread...
                There is no other cornbread native to anywhere else in Asia. If there were, you'd have named it, just add you namedropped broa de milho, which is younger than American cornbread.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >There is no other cornbread native to anywhere else in Asia.
                There's cornbread in Goa and nearby regions... if we don't now narrow the definition of cornbread to make Americans first.

                Are you really trying to claim a Portuguese colony lacked Portuguese corn bread because "I'm ignorant about it? kek.

                >which is younger than American cornbread.
                Lying will not change reality, broa de milho is FAR older than muttland's cornbread.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >There's cornbread in Goa and nearby regions.
                False. Otherwise, you'd have named them.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >I refuse to believe in this... because... you...
                Refusing to accept the truth does not makes it any less real.

                Now go ahead and keep claiming a Portuguese colony lacks Portuguese foods... because you are an ignorant liar.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Refusing to accept the truth does not makes it any less real.
                My point exactly.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Brooooooooooo... there are NO broas in Goa... just there are none... because... I said so ok
                You are the most dishonest mutt I've ever met. Maybe worse than the mutt who claim to be French.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Broa de milho dates to the 19th century.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                i visited Goa and there are broas there tard do you just invent lies as you go to feel you won

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Broa de milho dates you the 19th century.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >I just lied about broa origin... why are you refusing to pretend my lies are real
                Just because some mutt invented a lie it doesn't mean I'll troony-out and play pretend.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Cite a source proving otherwise.
                We have writing in Portugal. Shouldn't be hard. I read Portuguese and speak European Portuguese so any source you can cite saying otherwise would be fine

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >My LIES are always TRUTH, unless you prove me wrong
                You're the one lying about "Broa de milho dates to the 19th century", so how about you try to prove this? I can read Portuguese if you want to source in a civilized language instead of English

                I know the first time is hard, but you can do it.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >civiliZed
                Ah.
                I knew you were an American. Broa de milho dates to the 19th century, you American. No older recipes for it exist, American

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >here is a fake claim, accept it as true, reeeee
                >can you source it
                >here is the same fake claim repeated, accept it as true, reeeee
                Kek, you're just inventing crap as we go mate.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >you're just inventing crap as we go mate.
                Exactly my point, American. You've shifted from Mesoamerica to Europe to Asia hoping something will stick rather than staying with one point because each one has been debunked and thoroughly so. I don't know why you sent this party of your culinary heritage, American.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >blablabla.. you the mutt... blablabla
                So you lied about broas being from 19th century and is now trying to hide. Truly pathetic.

                >I'm living in Mexico
                Prove it, American.

                >I can lie... and refuse to prove... and it's true.... reeeee
                >No, you cannot disagree with me... how dare you.
                This is a chan, giving up after begin caught lying is fine.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >giving up after begin caught lying is fine.
                Exactly my point, American.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Reeeeeeeee... I lied... but no u...
                Kek, you're stupid

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >you're stupid
                Exactly my point, American.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Btw, are you the same guy "inventing facts" about banana bread and milk?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No. What's that about? Did someone claim your people, the Americans, invented dairy or something?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Someone tried to claim Americans invented "banana bread", but ended up spilling he was using an oddly specific definition that purposefully excluded all the older banana breads around the world.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                That's a ridiculous thing for your countrymen to claim, American

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yes, but it's not more ridiculous than American claims on cornbread, by using some a purposeful definition to exclude all cornbread before.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No cornbread predates even American cornbread and certainly not pone.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If by "American" you mean the natives, sure. If you mean the mutts, then this is bullshit.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                iyss, American.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Someone tried to claim Americans invented "banana bread", but ended up spilling he was using an oddly specific definition that purposefully excluded all the older banana breads around the world.

                Also, while not on Culinaly, I've met a few Americans who tried to claim they invented sausages, sandwiches, soda and a few other very generic foods.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >soda
                British.
                >sandwiches
                oldest known sandwich dates to ancient Israel but it was probably eaten in Libya millennia before then.
                >sausages
                Uncertain origins but it's entirely possible that several cultures developed them independently of one another.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It's obvious fake, two of these are far older than the US... but it doesn't stop people from making these claims.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Americans did, iinm, invent soda canning. I think it was developed by Dr. Somethingorother Physick in Philadelphia in the infancy of the nation. I'll have to check my research notes, American

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Sometimes Americans invented a variation of something like CANNED-soda or some version of cornbread, and try to claim they invented the very thing.

                This is often called the moon-landing-cope.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Don't disparage your own, American.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No cornbread predates even American cornbread and especially not pone. If they did, you'd have cited something starting otherwise.

                I asked for a source, but if this is too much, you can go back to spam "Broa de milho dates to the 19th century" until bullshit becomes truth.

                Just do it fast because I'll go to the gym soon.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >I'll go to the gym soon.
                Because you're in America and it's not night yet there.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I'm living in Mexico, but whatever... still waiting for something more than you lying about broas.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >I'm living in Mexico
                Prove it, American.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Broa de milho dates to the 19th century.

                Anything to support this crap, or are you just repeating "I'm a real girl" over and over expecting people to agree?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No cornbread predates even American cornbread and especially not pone. If they did, you'd have cited something starting otherwise.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >No cornbread predates even American cornbread and especially not pone. If they did, you'd have cited something starting otherwise.
                >Whatever bullshit I'm trying to push is true, because... you would have called me a liar long ago...
                I've have called you a liar long ago, tard.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Shouldn't you be the one who need to prove people in Europe and American made a huge effort to never grind corn and make bread with it for three centuries, just so an American could be "number one", this claim is so obviously fake.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No need, since evidence of pone dates to the 8th century, long before we even imagined there was a new world to colonise
                Provide evidence if cornbread in Europe that dates earlier than that

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, native Americans made cornbread before anyone else. But modern cornbread was not invented by Americans.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                False. We're it true, there would be cornbreads commonly eaten in places other than the US, India and Serbia.
                There is no evidence if any cornbread dating to any earlier than the 18th century cornbreads from the Chesapeake.
                If there were, you'd have provided it.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >We're it true, there would be cornbreads commonly eaten in places other than the US, India and Serbia.
                Just because you're ignorant and doesn't know about cornbread from other places, it doesn't mean they doesn't exist.

                >If there were, you'd have provided it.
                Portuguese broas are FAR older than muttland's cornbread.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Portuguese broas are FAR older than muttland's cornbread.
                False.
                Broa de milho dates to the 19th century. The Anglo colonies had it a hundred years prior

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Broas de milho date from far before 19th century, where did you read this crap?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                False. Were it true, you'd have claimed otherwise already.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >This MUST be false, because... you just said it now... and...
                Wow, guess anything I didn't spoke half an hour ago is not automatically fake.

                How stupid and desperate can you be?

  51. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Herr's
    Don't think I've ever seen that company on the shelves
    It's more like a billion Frito-Lay options

  52. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >sugar sugar sugar
    >carbs carbs carbs
    >sugar sugar sugar
    >Hispanic shit
    pretty accurate tbh wa

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