Tomato paste in coq au vin?

Do you put tomato paste in your coq au vin? It seems to make the color a little less gray, and more brownish red. Not sure I can really taste a difference, though. How do you coq your vin?

Mike Stoklasa's Worst Fan Shirt $21.68

UFOs Are A Psyop Shirt $21.68

Mike Stoklasa's Worst Fan Shirt $21.68

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is that legal?

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm allergic to wine
    t. sad frenchie

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Allergic to grapes or something else?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sulfites, it's in grapes, and it's also used to arrest fermentation in a lot of beers
        No such thing as sulfite-free wine
        Also used to clarify vodka and gin
        I get by, I substitute beer, cider and brandy, pomegranate syrup, tamarind, vinegar (apple) and stick with Norman recipes
        It makes going out to eat a roll of the dice, but as a side-effect, I'm a fricking baller cook now

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Damn, didn't know that. I always thought sulfites were added to prevent spoilage, not naturally occurring, as well.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah that's been illegal for like, 15 years
            I'm just glad it's required labelling in the US and EU now (even though all labelling requirements in the EU are still voluntary)

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Do you put tomato paste in your coq au vin?
    Yes, just make sure your wine isn't too tannic or acidic

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Yes, just make sure your wine isn't too tannic or acidic
      Why is that and how would I know?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Yes, just make sure your wine isn't too tannic or acidic
      Smart advice. Use young, fruity wines. Beaujolais nouveau is perfect. Bolder wines drown out the herbs and tomato flavor.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I actually came to the same conclusion, and thought it was just my uncultured palette.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >coq au vin
    Nobody has made or is aware of that dish
    Anyone decent at cooking makes food which appeals to everyone, and this? Not so. I don't like the way it looks, the broth is soapy and grease is forming at the top. The meat is definitely raw and fatty.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've made it with old roosters that I've raised and slaughtered, bro. It's a really good way to prepare chicken that needs an extended cooking time.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I've made it with old roosters that I've raised and slaughtered, bro.
        You can just get chicken legs from the grocery store. Why do you think you need to spend 5 years raising a rooster yourself before you're able to braise chicken meat in red wine, fricknut?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          1 year old rooster is already extremely tough. The flavor and texture of both the chicken and the braising liquid does not compare in the slightest.

          You could have just asked me what the difference was and not sounded conpletely moronic.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >and not sounded conpletely [sic] moronic.

            You *might just* be projecting in your concerns about sounding stupid. Keep on raising chickens, though. Sounds fun!

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Nope. You or that guy had absolutely no clue what they were talking about, and still chose to be rude.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Find literally any professional chef that only cooks coq au vin--or a recipe by one that directs this--with old roosters they raised themselves.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Chefs grind up filets for hamburger meat, but that doesn't mean it's a good idea.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Here comes the deflection.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It's not a deflection. It's a rejection of your point that chefs are a definitive authority, especially with respect to traditional peasant foods. The point of coq au vin is to make an old stringy rooster edible. That's why it has a long and fairly aggressive marinade. If you're making it with a fresh hen carcass, much of what you're doing is entirely wasted effort. If you actually understood cooking and why certain processes were in a given recipe, you'd know this stuff. But no, you just know the surface level of this stuff better than some random druggie on the subway and think that makes you capable of even kind of identifying actual authority on the subject.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Hahaha, know nothing.

                I accept your concession. 🙂

                Post literally any food you made, frickhead.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Here's my coq au vin using real old chicken. It was superb.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Ok, great. You've now proven that you cook and eat your pets. You can have equal status as me in this thread once you apologize for the shit attitude earlier.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                *apologise
                Sorry for correcting you, but it will help you in the future

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You didn't correct me. You just sounded like an idiot to someone who knows more than you.

                Only livestock I deem worthy shall gain status as pets. All else will remain livestock. I give all my animals a stress free life that would be impossible in nature, and in return they give me sustenance.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Nothing to do with what I corrected you on. But have sex with your chickens whilst playing late 60's soul if you want

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Here is a fantastic spanish chicken dish that I made with a cornish cross I raised, a young chicken. This was also incredibly good. It was for a dinner of 6 and everyone was in love with the dish. Served with couscous, and a simple garden.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah looks good

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah looks good

                Good job replying to yourself right as the post timer ran out.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Cope harder, or maybe post some food you've made before.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You are a guest in my thread, Kansan.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I'm the expat, not saying he isn't, tho

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Where is your final dish? I want to see how it turned out.

                Nothing to do with what I corrected you on. But have sex with your chickens whilst playing late 60's soul if you want

                Crazy ego.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I ate it, bro. I started the thread to talk about cooking, not to shame people who didn't sacrifice their pets for the sake of a moronic purity test.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Oh... must have been good if you forgot to take a pic of the final dish. That happens to me often.

                Also, you know we were both eating chicken, right?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You are a freak.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Woah, you are stupid! Just because a dish has a french name does not mean it is this fancy thing.
                Coq au vin is a peasants dish that was created specifically to utilize tough old roosters and hens in a tasty and delicious way.

                The awesome part is that you are admittedly ignorant compared to me and still you cannot accept that you are wrong. It's amusing.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >y-y-you're stupid!
                >I'm a peasant, you'll never understand!!
                >y-y-y-you're not allowed to make my food with your grocery store chicken!
                >waaaahhhhh!!!!!

                Are you done?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Hahaha, know nothing.

                I accept your concession. 🙂

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                My dad used to serve it with blood at his restaurant, but it was on the secret menu because it was a health code violation
                But even if you can't find a rooster you can get capons and they're usually cheaper than chickens

                >I personally feel like it's goddamn everywhere, but it could be a bit of a Southern France bias.
                It is. All the Popular French dishes contain often no garlic at all.

                >And yeah obviously there's lots of sauces without alcohol, I just mean that in general, the pattern of "onions + local meat + local alcohol + some vegetables and just throw it all in a pot" covers quite a lot of French regional cuisine, and is something you can have some fun with.
                That's just sauces everywhere. You will always need some flavourful liquid, thickening and aromatics. The French are just much more creative with sauces and especially spirits.

                Gaul literally means "garlic eater"
                That being said, I do believe Americanized French and Italian foods often call for more garlic than more "authentic" cuisines

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >health code violation
                Are you French?

                >That being said, I do believe Americanized French and Italian foods often call for more garlic than more "authentic" cuisines
                Obviously.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah my family moved to outside of Wichita when I was, like, 8

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I was just wondering, because you said blood was illegal.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That plus they slaughtered the roosters on-site out back by the loading dock

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >never heard of coq au vin
      Don't complain to me because you're an uncultured pajeet.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      4/10

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, in the form of sauce espagnole/demi glace.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'll add a tablespoon or so to the mirepoix when it's almost done if I remember. I'm not sure it makes a big difference either so it's no big deal when I forget.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sure buddy you do whatever you want

    honestly my favourite thing about all those french sauce dishes is that they're all very customizable. Like there's the "standard" versions - boeuf bourguignon, coq au vin, carbonnade flamande etc.

    But at the end of the day it's all the same idea : cooking meat, onions (or scallops), garlic and whatever vegetable in an alcohol-based sauce. You can customize it just about however you want in term of which specific alcohol you use with which specific meat and vegetables. You'd really have to go out of your way to find something that doesn't work.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >onions (or scallops),
      That's an interesting substitution.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm sure he meant shallots

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Haha, I meant "shallot" obviously. Don't know why I had it translated as "scallop" in my head.

        Garlic isn't even used that often in French cuisine. Also many white sauces contain no alcohol.

        >Garlic isn't even used that often in French cuisine
        I personally feel like it's goddamn everywhere, but it could be a bit of a Southern France bias.

        And yeah obviously there's lots of sauces without alcohol, I just mean that in general, the pattern of "onions + local meat + local alcohol + some vegetables and just throw it all in a pot" covers quite a lot of French regional cuisine, and is something you can have some fun with.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >I personally feel like it's goddamn everywhere, but it could be a bit of a Southern France bias.
          It is. All the Popular French dishes contain often no garlic at all.

          >And yeah obviously there's lots of sauces without alcohol, I just mean that in general, the pattern of "onions + local meat + local alcohol + some vegetables and just throw it all in a pot" covers quite a lot of French regional cuisine, and is something you can have some fun with.
          That's just sauces everywhere. You will always need some flavourful liquid, thickening and aromatics. The French are just much more creative with sauces and especially spirits.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Garlic isn't even used that often in French cuisine. Also many white sauces contain no alcohol.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This triggers the peasantry.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It doesn't as you can't get roosters easily and soup hens have no meat on them. I wouldn't marinate younger chickens opposed to roosters though.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >young chicken
      >the size of a turkey

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *