Was just in Japan, brought back a donabe. Anyone have tips for use or favorite recipes to make in one?

Was just in Japan, brought back a donabe. Anyone have tips for use or favorite recipes to make in one? I was thinking of having friends over and doing a big pot of sukiyaki or chankonabe

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    how about a cheeseburger, commie?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      wow epic
      take all my upvotes

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's a Dutch Oven, make wiener aux vin.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tagine pot: 😐
    Tagine pot, Japan: :O

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nice score, Anon. Misonabe would be my choice.

      Japanese ceramics are some of the best in the world.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    shabu shabu

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A donabe is versatile! You can cook various dishes like hot pot, stews, rice, and even grilled or steamed dishes.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    so its a $4 claypot you could have bought from chinatown?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's a $400 donabe that's been fire-roasted in a kiln by craftsmen from Nippon over 9000 times you gaijin pleb.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Used to be have one, too, but I donabe anymore.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That’s a pretty corny joke, anon. Donabe such a homosexual!

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If it came without an instruction booklet: First thing you do is cook a thick rice porridge in it. Make sure it's filled up to the to the top when you do this, as this is seasoning it.
    Porridge can be consumed.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      that was not on the instruction sheet, thanks

      motsu nabe
      >tripe, chitlins, offal meat
      >cabbage, could use nappa but doesn't absorb fat as well regular cabbage
      >firm tofu
      >dashi broth
      >sesame oil
      >garlic
      >sake', mirin is fine too I guess, I don't use it
      >and either salt, soy sauce, miso on what kinda flavor you want
      >other shit you want, nabe is honestly whatever you wanna throw in

      figure out the rest

      ooh organ meat and miso sounds quite nice

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lmao that looks like a kitschy gum leaf design pot you’d find in a second hand shop in australia

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Donabe cow, man.
      |///|
      | ........ |
      | ........ |
      |...(o)(o)
      C......._)
      | ,___|
      |..../
      /____
      /.........

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous
  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    learn how to use a rice cooker first.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can I come over for dinner.
    I will unironically come over for dinner if you live near me.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      how do you unironically hoop up with anons anoymously?

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nabe is simple to do. Just make a broth and season it how you want. Chop up veggies and meat. Dunk it in now, serve when ready. Or plate it all up, and dunk it in while eating.
    You're going to need a hotplate to keep the damn thing warm on the table, though.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    motsu nabe
    >tripe, chitlins, offal meat
    >cabbage, could use nappa but doesn't absorb fat as well regular cabbage
    >firm tofu
    >dashi broth
    >sesame oil
    >garlic
    >sake', mirin is fine too I guess, I don't use it
    >and either salt, soy sauce, miso on what kinda flavor you want
    >other shit you want, nabe is honestly whatever you wanna throw in

    figure out the rest

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      once your done throw in ramen noodle into the broth as a bonus afterwards, that's the real treat of the meal

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    With the kind of donabe you got, you basically can just use it to cook up a soup to serve family style. I disagree with the dude who said it's a Dutch oven. The donabe shouldn't be heated without liquid food in it, and since it holds heat so well, it will continue cooking food well past the point of doneness, making leftovers pretty gross. This style of cooking hearkens back to when people lived in huts and had to scavenge weeds from the side of the mountains and crustaceans from the beach just to have enough food to wake up the next day to scavenge even more weeds and crustaceans. To be honest, it's not a particularly interesting way to eat for one or two people at a time. You need to have a donabe party with a whole family of people in a good mood to make something out of it.

    What I've found donabe can do really well that other cooking utensils can't, though, is cook rice. The grains get superheated from all angles while and after being steamed, and it's really easy to toast the rice on the bottom of the pot while still getting good release. And as opposed to vegetables or meat, rice only gets better if you leave it in the pot for an extra hour after being ready, while the donabe still has a ton of heat in it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      cool history lesson, nerd. post recipes

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