What pan do I buy?

I'm throwing out my scratched up teflon pan. Done with plastic coatings. What should I replace it with? I use my pan every single day.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >trips checkaroonied
    MJeatingpopcorn.gif

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cast iron.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      1 small non stick and 1 big cast iron

      How well does cast iron heat up? I hear nothing but good things about it but I'm not sure how practical it is as a "daily driver". I don't want to have to wait forever. I mainly cook chicken, ground beef, and veggies.

      >I'm throwing out my scratched up teflon pan.
      check for cancer

      It's joever for me

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I think stainless steel is the best for general use.

        Not as much of a a pain to clean as cast iron and works better (though still not ideal) for acidic foods, heats up just ok, and as long as you use a decent amount of oil in the pan it won't stick, though if you don't use enough it'll stick and burn and be a horrible mess. It's durable too and won't scratch as easily as a softer metal will.

        Just make sure to buy a decent stainless steel pan, not all steel is made the same. Don't be afraid to spend a decent chunk of change on good stainless steel, it'll last you ages.

        And cast iron doesn't heat up super evenly though it's never been a deal breaker for me, though a pro of cast iron is that it can go in the oven fine and it'll heat up even there. My main issue with cast iron is how much of a pain in the ass it is to handle.

        And if you're one of the types of shizos you see on this bored who's constantly worried about getting cancer from cookware, you won't have to worry with stainless steel, or even cast iron.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          stainless steel isn't responsive, dipshit
          manufacturers have to pull all manner of multi-layer chicanery to make it usable in that regard

          get a carbon steel. they have the potential to be almost as non stick as teflon. they sear almost like a cast iron, and they are almost as responsive as a stainless steel. really you should have all three, but in my experience carbon steel is the best all around pan. its like the best parts of all the other pans wrapped up into one.

          Thanks for the info. I poked around my cupboard and found that I still have an 8" stainless revere ware skillet that I was able to clean up. I'll look around for a larger stainless one for my veggies (I cook a lot of tomatoes).

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        cast irons suck because their heating spots are always inconsistent. one part will always get hotter than the other and it's totally random from pan to pan. they're slow to heat up though they retain heat which is useful for some cooking techniques but not mandatory. steel is the way to go. i like to have a small teflon pan for eggs that i make sure not to scratch and only use with my wooden spatula

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I use a nonstick pan for eggs too and only eggs, they're a pain in other pans if you're not poaching/boiling/frying them. As long as you don't heat a nonstick to super high heat or scratch it to hell and back you won't get cancer.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Cast iron or carbon steel and stainless.

        >How well does cast iron heat up?
        Takes forever to heat up, but retains heat.
        Not a problem with an induction stove. Its ok.
        Carbon steel would heat up faster, but less evenly.

        aluminum

        You can probably scrape off teflon and have aluminium pan. Aluminium pans suck.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >How well does cast iron heat up?
        I use it for cooking dinner, a big one can basically do everything, even serve as a pot. You need to preheat a cast iron for 5 minutes before you put oil in it, then it's like nonstick. You use the tiny nonstick for basic things, like eggs for a quick breakfast or something and the big cast iron for meals.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    1 small non stick and 1 big cast iron

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I'm throwing out my scratched up teflon pan.
    check for cancer

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    stainless steel for searing
    enameled cast iron for eggs

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    aluminum

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    get a carbon steel. they have the potential to be almost as non stick as teflon. they sear almost like a cast iron, and they are almost as responsive as a stainless steel. really you should have all three, but in my experience carbon steel is the best all around pan. its like the best parts of all the other pans wrapped up into one.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      stainless steel isn't responsive, dipshit
      manufacturers have to pull all manner of multi-layer chicanery to make it usable in that regard

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        stainless steel

        did you think that was a gotcha, homosexual?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You should be beaten until you aren't responsive you little autistic queer

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have a cast iron for daily cooking. Dry up after use which can be done while cleaning up. Weight makes tossing harder, but not that a spatula won't work.
    It can be tossed in oven too. however the handle makes it hard to utilize full space of an oven like baking sheet and dish does. Haven't seen any stove or heating surface it has issue with. most thin pan warp like crazy thus even the flat bottomed ones would rotate on those flat glass electric stove.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've a small cast iron (cooking for 1-3, generally easier) and one huge cast iron (cooking for 3-6, baking, stir frying, sauté etc) both with lids that work, flat and domed. I'm not going to say they aren't a bit of work / effort to maintain, but I've had them my entire life and use them almost every day. They go from burner to oven to bbq to open fire / coals no problem.

    Prior to getting them I went through many non-stick frying pans, sauté pans, shallow casserole pans etc. I occasionally miss one non-stick pan because for certain things, tuiles, generally things where very low colour browning is required using low temperature, but for these things I use a silicone liner and the oven.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Carbon steel is the best compromise out of all pans.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you are jabbed, go with Teflon, you clearly don't care about your health. It's easier to use, easier to clean, cheaper. Pure blood use stainless steel.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I use my stainless steel far my than my cast iron. i think its just better for daily use and easy to care for.
    i love my cast iron though because it makes an amazing pan pizza

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    stainless is mandatory but you will need a second pan no matter what pan type you get because you cant do everything in only one pan.

    my second choice would be carbon steel because a thick stainless pan can make cast iron 99% obsolete while performing significantly better due to perfectly even heat distribution. the only downside is the price especially if you're not located in europe, demeyere proline will cost you an arm and a leg but it's also a league above the american competition. those made in & all clad signature lines are very overpriced for what you get. they aren't even as good as demeyere's second tier 5-ply stuff.

    a combo of thinner stainless + thick cast iron will be much cheaper but also not as good and less versatile. it's definitely more annoying as well because cast iron is not very pleasant to clean and it takes forever to heat it up compared to carbon steel which is basically perfect for daily use.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Get carbon steel, good middle ground between cast iron and stainless but it can be difficult to maintain at first

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stainless steel is the simplest solution for an everyday pan. Everything else has some different weakness or compromise or is great with some foods but bad with others.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    get a steel can and a cast iron pan for when you want to sear meat.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    According to my chart stainless steel is the best

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >clean up
      >hard
      What do you mean? It is very similar to non-stick except you can't soak it and have to dry it off.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i cook tomato sauce in my cast iron all the time. i’m still alive and the pan is fine

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Nonstick prperties: low
      Learn 2 temperature newbie

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/RT1BK0P.jpg

        This chart is like it was written by someone who doesn't cook and learned all he knows by listening to other people and ads.

        All types of cookware, including a literal rock on a burning stump, can cook most foods if you have the technique to compensate for it. It's better to focus on the differences than trying to compare degrees of similarity, though.

        Cast iron is fricking heavy. Women do not enjoy using it. If you have a girlfriend you expect to cook breakfast for you, she's going to use UberEats to order you Dunkin Donuts instead of messing with it. It's also really slow to respond to heat changes--this is not universal, though. Griswolds are known for being thinner and more responsive, for example. Cleaning and cooking with acid, IMO, are minor details. Enamel mitigates them, or you can just stop treating your cast iron like it's a baby.

        Stainless is generally less massive than cast iron, but you can get a 12.5 inch Demeyere Proline, and the thing weighs over 6 pounds, and sears like a champ. You should not be putting any quality cookware in the dishwasher, ever, so take that line off your chart. Nonstick comes from your technique, not the pan, and that goes for cast iron too. The cast iron subreddit is full of homosexuals with a Lodge pan full of stuck-on egg. Go check for yourself. Stainless can be just as nonstick as any other pan, but it takes technique. IMO, stainless is the best all-rounder pan, but it may behoove you to have a cast iron pan also.

        Teflon should not be cooked on, ever. Nor should any other plastic-type coatings. It really just comes down to cast iron and stainless, and you should probably have both.

        Yeah I made it when I was deciding which cookware to buy so it's not quite accurate at all
        I learned carbon steel is not that hard to clean bu heat control is very important

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This chart is like it was written by someone who doesn't cook and learned all he knows by listening to other people and ads.

      All types of cookware, including a literal rock on a burning stump, can cook most foods if you have the technique to compensate for it. It's better to focus on the differences than trying to compare degrees of similarity, though.

      Cast iron is fricking heavy. Women do not enjoy using it. If you have a girlfriend you expect to cook breakfast for you, she's going to use UberEats to order you Dunkin Donuts instead of messing with it. It's also really slow to respond to heat changes--this is not universal, though. Griswolds are known for being thinner and more responsive, for example. Cleaning and cooking with acid, IMO, are minor details. Enamel mitigates them, or you can just stop treating your cast iron like it's a baby.

      Stainless is generally less massive than cast iron, but you can get a 12.5 inch Demeyere Proline, and the thing weighs over 6 pounds, and sears like a champ. You should not be putting any quality cookware in the dishwasher, ever, so take that line off your chart. Nonstick comes from your technique, not the pan, and that goes for cast iron too. The cast iron subreddit is full of homosexuals with a Lodge pan full of stuck-on egg. Go check for yourself. Stainless can be just as nonstick as any other pan, but it takes technique. IMO, stainless is the best all-rounder pan, but it may behoove you to have a cast iron pan also.

      Teflon should not be cooked on, ever. Nor should any other plastic-type coatings. It really just comes down to cast iron and stainless, and you should probably have both.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >but you can get a 12.5 inch Demeyere Proline
        >It really just comes down to cast iron and stainless
        From what I've seen cast iron pans like Lodge (3.55mm) or Skeppshult (5mm) are not even as thick as 5.5mm Demeyere Proline so what's the point? You can make great pan sauces in that Proline and you will have a much more even sear. A carbon steel Matfer or Turk make more sense to me as an alternative that heats up quick and is more lightweight

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >From what I've seen cast iron pans like Lodge (3.55mm) or Skeppshult (5mm) are not even as thick as 5.5mm Demeyere Proline so what's the point?
          It's still worth buying a seasoned cast iron Dutch oven or skillet for deep frying. No need to clean burnt-on oil off the pan.

          Also, although you don't need an enameled cast iron Dutch oven or braiser, it does make certain things, like coq au vin and beef bourguignon, a little more convenient, and arguably gives you the best overall result.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >It's still worth buying a cast iron Dutch oven
            I agree but I thought we were only talking about pans. You will use enameled cast iron pots (the pans are borderline useless) for completely different dishes anyway so I don't think they're comparable

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >I agree but I thought we were only talking about pans.
              Pic related is a type of "pan." Who said that a Dutch oven is an actual oven?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You know what I meant. Nobody uses their Staub dutch oven to cook steak or burgers.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >. You should not be putting any quality cookware in the dishwasher, ever
        Why not, with a stainless steel pan?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Mostly because of how harsh a lot of dishwashing detergents are. Sodium hydroxide, also known as oven cleaner or lye, is in a lot of them, and will etch/dissolve a lot of materials. I ruined the bakelite handles of my Revere Ware saucepans that my mom gave me when I moved out because I was stupid enough to run them through the dishwasher. Lye will literally dissolve aluminum, and stupid people, who can't express themselves without using memes, might be tempted to think "hahaha it's just All-Crap that has this problem," but there are a lot of stainless clad pans with exposed aluminum, as well as pots and pans that simply have an exposed aluminum exterior. It's literally the industry standard.

          There are a lot of ceramic pieces that shouldn't be put through the dishwasher because the unglazed parts will absorb soap. It would also be incredibly foolish to put copper cookware through the dishwasher, even if it had stainless and not tin on the inside, since the copper will always come out less shiny than when it went in. Cast iron and carbon steel of course will come out rusty. There are also some specialty coatings that you can find on stainless but the coatings themselves aren't dishwasher-proof.

          A stainless pan will survive a dishwasher, and if there's zero exposed aluminum, it will survive indefinitely, but I think handwashing is always going to do a better job of cleaning, and a stainless pot or pan will always look better, and surface show less wear, after handwashing it for 45-90 seconds than being in the dishwasher for four hours.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    12” carbon steel pan with welded handle. none of that rivet shit
    you really don’t need anything else as far as pans go
    maybe a 12” stainless steel pan as well if you want

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    from my experience tri-clad copper, alu and stainless is best daily driver.
    Cast iron is the best for steak (griddle), and all copper is good for rapid heat exchange but can be a bit temperamental.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Cast iron is the best for steak
      no, stainless steel is but only if it's just as thick as cast iron

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        noted

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stainless steel. Nothing comes close. Teflon can't sear or brown shit, carbon steel is too heavy for no benefit, cast iron needs too much babying. I bought an all clad d3 skillet and I use it multiple times a day with 0 complaints

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >carbon steel is too heavy for no benefit
      the benefit is that it's "non stick" and if your stainless steel pan weighs less it means that it's shit

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What about those hybrid pans with non stick and metal surface? I'd be willing to trade off some convenience if they would last longer

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think steel pan is the best, but also burns your foods quite easily if you are not paying attention

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >cast iron 42 results
    frick yeah

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Gas stove? Carbon steel
    Electric stove? Cast iron
    Stainless in addition if you like sauces

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    dont listen to the cast iron gays. Your workhorse should be a stainless steel pan. Have both a large and a small, preferably with lids. Once you have decent stainless steel pans you can get a cast iron or even better, a carbon steel pan. Those can't be used with acidic food like tomato sauce or even acidic pan sauces. Don't listen to the other morons in this thread they have no clue about equipment and they can't cook.

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