What the frick

>follow recipe
>it tells me to put in massive amounts of flour
>doesn't form any dough
why the frick do recipes do this?

https://nielsenmassey.com/recipes/vanilla-honey-butter-crescent-rolls/

Did this recipe twice and reduced the flour and it still turned straight powder. I've made pizza dough, pie dough and special dough many times so what the fucjk?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Because the recipe says 1/2 cup milk instead of 1 1/2 cup milk. Use your brain next time.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >follow recipe
      >it's wrong

      yeah and that blog claims to have adapted it from a recipe at another link, which uses 3/4 cup of milk and 5 cups of flour.
      OP are you measuring your flour by cups or by grams? If by cups, how are you filling your measuring cup?

      I use the scooper and level it off flat.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >it's wrong
        This sort of error does happen occasionally, and you should be prepared to notice it and make corrections as you go. Sometimes they'll leave out an ingredient; water is a common one to be forgotten, so it's also possible that OP's recipe was supposed to be 1/2 cup milk and 1/4 cup water or something. Looking at the link chain at the history of that recipe it looks like some of the previous iterations used both water and milk.
        >I use the scooper and level it off flat
        That's part of your problem - that's not how you measure flour by volume. You're using way too much flour. If you're going to measure by volume, then you need to spoon the flour out of your bag and sprinkle it into the measuring cup. You're using about 50% more flour than the recipe calls for. In general when following a baking recipe, if you're going to go by the volumetric version then (a) you should know how to measure by volume and (b) you should be prepared to adjust the recipe on the fly to adapt to measurement errors. I'm not going to say that going by weight is superior, I use both measurement techniques when cooking, but going by volume tends to make for a more seat-of-the-pants cooking experience.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It does sound like it could use more liquid (not 1.5 cups though), is that recipe just reposted by Nielsen Massey from some rando? The link at the bottom of the recipe goes to the site of a freelance food stylist.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah and that blog claims to have adapted it from a recipe at another link, which uses 3/4 cup of milk and 5 cups of flour.
      OP are you measuring your flour by cups or by grams? If by cups, how are you filling your measuring cup?

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >cups
    No wonder it's wrong.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    git gud

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    use weight for baking not fricking cups. for cooking cups are fine because most recipes can tolerate some variation in the amounts of ingredients without too much trouble, but for baking precision is essential, at least until you know what you're doing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >it's wrong
      This sort of error does happen occasionally, and you should be prepared to notice it and make corrections as you go. Sometimes they'll leave out an ingredient; water is a common one to be forgotten, so it's also possible that OP's recipe was supposed to be 1/2 cup milk and 1/4 cup water or something. Looking at the link chain at the history of that recipe it looks like some of the previous iterations used both water and milk.
      >I use the scooper and level it off flat
      That's part of your problem - that's not how you measure flour by volume. You're using way too much flour. If you're going to measure by volume, then you need to spoon the flour out of your bag and sprinkle it into the measuring cup. You're using about 50% more flour than the recipe calls for. In general when following a baking recipe, if you're going to go by the volumetric version then (a) you should know how to measure by volume and (b) you should be prepared to adjust the recipe on the fly to adapt to measurement errors. I'm not going to say that going by weight is superior, I use both measurement techniques when cooking, but going by volume tends to make for a more seat-of-the-pants cooking experience.

      I have used many other recipes measuring by cups and they've come out perfectly fine. This recipe is simply fricking wrong. I don't see why you're so adament on defending it. If the person who made the recipe uses cups in their baking then you should also be using cups or else you aren't replicating what they're doing.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why are you using the recipe if its wrong, also you can just add flour gradually and mix until you get desired consistency

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Because I didn't know it was wrong until after following it, dumb moron.

          https://i.imgur.com/3TFGrqh.png

          the recipe may be wrong, but you are moronic for baking by volume. hope this helps

          If you don't replicate what they did you won't have the right recipe. Be stupid elsewhere.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Because I didn't know it was wrong until after following it, dumb moron.
            >Did this recipe twice

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >didn't know it was wrong until after following it
            >twice
            goddamn but you're moronic as frick

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        the recipe may be wrong, but you are moronic for baking by volume. hope this helps

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >you're moronic for baking successfully
          Seethe more, baking autist.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    following a recipe was your first mistake
    study gluten and hydration dynamics

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I have worked at two different bakeries and this is such a smoothbrain take I can't even

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >>it tells me to put in massive amounts of flour
    it actually has you eyeball when to stop.
    It has you use half of the entire flour, add a bit more to your mixer, only until it comes together, and then stop. The varying amount of flour is to account for baking on a dry day versus a rainy day, ie how moist is your flour.

    Did you not use an electric mixer? Adding 1/2 cup more at a time is typical.
    This is a "crescent roll" recipe. I just looked at a 2nd common recipe, and it's similar liquid, butter and flour, so, explain how you didn't get dough at 1/2 of the flour. I suspect you added it all at once, not in steps while combining.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yes well we've long since established itt that OP is a fricking moron.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The recipe literally says put all the flour in and only keep 1/4th cup of the flour out, moron.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No it doesn't, moron.

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