what's the best way to prepare cabbage?

what's the best way to prepare cabbage? i like lightly fermented, the ones that is fermented but still crunchy and has a fresh taste, don't like so much sauerkraut when it becomes soft sludgy

Schizophrenic Conspiracy Theorist Shirt $21.68

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

Schizophrenic Conspiracy Theorist Shirt $21.68

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1)boil
    2)drain
    3)slather with butter
    t.cabbagemaster

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This, but first you must learn the mystic path of cabbage selection in order to get one that doesn't taste like butthole.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    roasted with oil and parmesan

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    love youself high iq frogposter

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I often make (japanese style?) coleslaw. I've tasted roasted cabbage before and I've been wanting to make it at home following this recipe:

    ?si=FFOkq2TUAHSQ1edn

    also, it's pretty good just boiled, maybe with some sun dried tomatoes

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Miso (みそ or 味噌) is a traditional Japanese seasoning. It is a thick paste produced by fermenting soybeans with salt and kōji (the fungus Aspergillus oryzae)
      didn't know miso was a thing, i thought it was just the name of the soup

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        it's an acquired taste. If you want to try it I suggest shiro (white) miso as it's milder and many japanese people don't like the red variety.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sauteed with lots of salt and garlic

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The rest of Italy makes fun of my part of Italy because our only native types of risotto are cabbage risotto and potato risotto. They say it's poor as shit for but IDGAF because they're both delicious. Cabbage risotto is breasts.
    Also, you can steam or boil the greenest outer leaves then roll then around a filling and cook them a second time to finish it set that filling. In Italy, polenta, rice and similar things are common, mixed with mushrooms or other produce but other parts of the world mostly roll the leaves around meat and rice. I make tiny, self-contained pork meatloaves wrapped in cabbage leaves, flavoured with caramelised onions, pennybuns and dill, served with pennybun gravy.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      ahah trovato il polentone

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Ti sbagli. Sono napoletano. Riso e verza e un piatto tipico partenopeo.
        But I do like northern food, too, and what I described does sound very northern. : )

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >riso e verza
          never tried it.
          >Ingredients: pancetta
          ti piace vincere facile

          >potato risotto
          I know that in Bari riso, patate e cozze is pretty common. Sounds like a very traditional "we eat what we have" dish. It doesn't thoroughly convince me even though I'm not completely against double carbs (I'd eat culurgiones any day of the week)

          https://i.imgur.com/pMYYdmJ.jpg

          I like it sauteed with soy sauce and garlic and ginger

          >sprinkles some sesame seeds
          instantly gourmet

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >riso, patate e cozze
            Yeah, that's barese af.
            No mussels for us but we do use cheese ends and ham ends in it so I guess we "like winning easy" there, too.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    G8rH8r

    I like it sauteed with soy sauce and garlic and ginger

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    very thinly slice and toss with salt and a good vinegar, simple as

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stewing is my favorite. Caramelizing the onions first really enhances the sweetness that cabbage takes on as it cooks. Goes great as a side with anything, I even just throw it on top of stir-fry.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Toss it in the pan with the meat and it marinade / rendering after the flip.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    fry it in a pan with bacon
    add some chili powder, soy sauce or worchestershire sauce. whichever of the 3 you prefer

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I prefer it as a simple salad. Just slice some cabbage (white is the most common but red works too), add salt and a pinch of sugar so they draw the moisture out of the cabbage until it becomes soft, then add some vinegar and a little bit of olive oil.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Shredded and submerged in ice water for 1 hour, as a side for tonkatsu

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cabbage rolls are a GOAT batch cooking food
    >Boil head of cabbage for 15 mins, remove core and separate leaves
    >Finely dice an onion, cook it on medium stirring frequently so that it doesn't turn brown. Add a drop of water if it starts drying out. Cook it for at least 15 mins. At the end, remove from heat and add 1 tbsp of Hungarian paprika and mix
    >In a bowl mix minced beef/pork, half of cooked onion & garlic, uncooked rice, a little flour & a beaten egg, salt & pepper (also sauerkraut if you want)
    >In a deep ovensafe baking tray, place the remaining onion paprika mix
    >Make palm sized meatballs of the mix and fold them into cylindrical dumplings using the boiled cabbage leaves. They should look like fat cigars
    >Place them in oven dish, cover in canned tomato sauce & some sauerkraut and bake in the oven at 425F/200C for about 40mins. Add some beef stock if the tomato sauce doesn't cover the cabbage rolls.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *