Why are lids on olive oil bottles like this

>attempt to tighten the lid
>it overruns the threads and is now loose
>try to tighten again
>stop just before you overrun the threads
>oops, you overran the threads and it's loose again

I always read these consumer reports and advisories about rancid olive oil. Could this be why? I don't understand why they sell oil in such substandard packaging.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    OP are you one of those people they show on infomercials fricking up even the simplest tasks before they start shilling their product

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      My theory is that you're an idiot who can't screw a bottle top on

      t doesn't buy good olive oil

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    never had that problem
    maybe the oil is making it slippery

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I have experienced this with multiple brands of olive oil. I know it's a common issue. Oil will not make threads too "slippery" to engage.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        do you have a better theory you stank b***h?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          My theory is that you're an idiot who can't screw a bottle top on

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Im not the one with the problem, dirty prostitute
            my lids are just fine

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have literally never in my life encountered rancid oil.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This means you've only ever had rancid oil then because it's extremely common.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        its not
        how little olive oil are you using?

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >buy olive oil in cans
    >pour oil into special olive oil bottle
    >???
    >never deal with slippery hands again

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i'm a potter and made one of those for myself, but because it can't ever be properly scrubbed it developed a rancid odor over time. it's pretty hot where i live.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >can't ever be properly scrubbed
        Can't you just wash it with hot water and soap?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          it's oil. eventually it needs to be scrubbed, particularly for a ceramic vessel that is still very slightly porous and more textured than glass.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Why didn't you glaze the inside?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              He used all his glaze on ham.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i know exactly what you're talking about, anon. and i'm not some cro-magnon with no mechanical sympathy. i work with my hands. get a cork or a pour spout with a top. or you can decant it into a restaurant supply squeezy bottle. having oil in a squeezy bottle is pretty nice. there's a reason why it's a line cook/chefy thing.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I’ve been repackaging it into mason jars.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        you can get pour spout tops for mason jars i think but that seems overly complicated

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    OP here asking the real questions

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Buy a spout. I also recently saw a video of using a Sheridan's bottle, splitting it into its two parts, and using it for oil and vinegar. Pic related. Very cool IMO.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That's because cheap products have cheap design anon. Those kinds of caps are for the cheapest oil possible.
    You can determine the quality of the product even from the packaging. Those caps cost around 3 cents. If you get a good cap that will pour your oil elegantly, it's gonna be at least 70 cents (and it's not reusable).

    Producers that sell tip top olive oil are required to use a special cap (of course is mandatory only in Italy and Spain).

    The best solution is to either get an oil ceramic container and buy bulk olive oil from a trusted producer, or buy nice bottles that have this cap (also from trusted producers)

    T. Olive oil merchant

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This cap is also used in America you moron

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I could care less, I don't live in the US, OP does. I was answering his question

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That is called an anti-fraud cap and it's mandatory because mafia Black folk mix Italian EVOO with Tunisian gutter oil. First world countries don't have this problem.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Buys super cheap olive oil from company situated in a mafia area
        >OH no mafia scammed me!

        If you want to remove the cap it literally takes a pair of pliers and a new cap.

        They invented that cap because restaurants would get an expensive bottle and fill it with cheap olive oil

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Never had this problem in my life
    OP dumb as hell

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They probably make them in such quantity, they keep the tolerances loose to keep costs down. Once in a while you get a run of bottlecaps that spin like this. It's endemic on the cheaper, plastic bottles & lids.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I assume even if you dont spill the oil, some vapor eventually makes its way up the grooves and makes them slippery.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I went through 6-8 liters of their 100% California bottles in the last yearish. None have had issues with the caps or threads. You're just moronic.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hear me out:
    >glass bottle
    >stored in cabinet

    No container issues, no light issues.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      who has cabinet's that tall?

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Never had that problem. Do you have motor issues?

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