Why didn't anyone tell me about ceramic pans? I bought one 'cos they looked pretty.

Why didn't anyone tell me about ceramic pans? I bought one 'cos they looked pretty. Turns out it's a fricking joy to cook on. Smoove as butter.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We have a set took a while to get used to, they are a bit fragile and my MIL used fricking metal on one and took a chunk out of the very middle but it's a tiny scratch
    Would replace with more

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's a scam, the reason it is nonstick is because it was a layer of silicone that will wear off within weeks

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'll try to be gentle and only use plastic and wood.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >plastic and wood.
        sounds too hard and scratchy. why not just use silicone utensils?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Wood is too hard?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Nah I mostly exclusively use wood with mine

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Copper pans are the most enjoyable to use. 😀 Get one.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What's so special about copper?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's expensive but heats evenly and is somewhat naturally non-stick but you can give yourself copper poisoning if it's old, used, and not sealed correctly
        You only need a copper bowl for whipping eggs otherwise it's mostly decorative

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >copper poisoning
          Yikes!

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            mmm gobber [boidsoning

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The tin coatings are pretty strong and quite durable. You would have to be a big tard to get copper poisoning. Firstly copper salts taste really bad, and secondly a small scratch in the tin will not effect you.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              It's expensive but heats evenly and is somewhat naturally non-stick but you can give yourself copper poisoning if it's old, used, and not sealed correctly
              You only need a copper bowl for whipping eggs otherwise it's mostly decorative

              Copper pans are the most enjoyable to use. 😀 Get one.

              I can not seem to figure out how to cook on copper. I tried using an IR thermometer and measuring the temperature of the oil to about what it is when the liedenfrost effect happens in stainless, and when I would add food to a carbon steel pan (cooking different things), but can never get any kind of sear on meat, and eggs always stick.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It isn't for doing hard sears like on a steak. I like it best for sweating vegetables, frying eggs, saucy type things, and more delicate meats. Is your pan fairly thick on the bottom?

                I did meatballs where I put them in a cold, oiled pan, and brought it up to heat on a medium low heat. Didn't stick, seared up really nice.

                The food should release itself once the sear is nearing completion if you bring it up to temp properly.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >The tin coatings are pretty strong and quite durable
              are you aware that tin melts at 230C?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Strength and durability have NOTHING to do with melting point in this context.

                Rule 1 of copper: you NEVER heat a dry copper pan.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >heat the pan for 10 seconds more than necessary and you will be eating food coated in tin and your pan will be ruined
                ok. can you at least be honest for one second and stop pushing this braindead bullshit from the times before stainless steel was invented as "reliable" and "durable"?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You can't read!

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >heat the pan for 10 seconds more than necessary and you will be eating food coated in tin and your pan will be ruined
                ok. can you at least be honest for one second and stop pushing this braindead bullshit from the times before stainless steel was invented as "reliable" and "durable"?

                No way in hell you have unlined copper and tin melts at 450 meaning the linings are fragile. Copper is stainless lined these days, and it's mostly for flexing

                1. Tin forms a molecular bond with copper. It's very difficult to break that bond by simply melting it. If you melt tin on the surface of the pan and happen to push it around with your spatula, it creates ugly streaks and beads, but the copper rarely becomes exposed from this. All you're doing is pushing around the *excess* tin. The important part of the tin is only a few atoms thick, and isn't really as effected by overheating as you seem to think. Here's a video where a tinsmith shows exactly what I'm talking about: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TciUEGxk2HE Despite melting the tin, the pan remains perfectly usable. The most harmful thing to do to a copper pan is to use metal utensils.

                2. The pan surface rarely needs to exceed 450 degrees. Contrary to what moronic cast iron users will tell you about "gettin that pan rippin hot to getchu a good sear," the Maillard reaction occurs most efficiently between 280-330 degrees. And as long as there is food in the pan, the temperature of the moisture in the food, boiling at a constant 212 degrees, will act as a buffer to the pan's temperature

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Tinlets absolutely btfo.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              No way in hell you have unlined copper and tin melts at 450 meaning the linings are fragile. Copper is stainless lined these days, and it's mostly for flexing

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >heat the pan for 10 seconds more than necessary and you will be eating food coated in tin and your pan will be ruined
                ok. can you at least be honest for one second and stop pushing this braindead bullshit from the times before stainless steel was invented as "reliable" and "durable"?

                Let me guess you need soft steel and axe wedge knives because a properly thin knife chips too easily?

                Don't be a shit cook and you won't frick your pan. I've been using mine daily for months and nothing bad has happened to it.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                [...]
                [...]
                1. Tin forms a molecular bond with copper. It's very difficult to break that bond by simply melting it. If you melt tin on the surface of the pan and happen to push it around with your spatula, it creates ugly streaks and beads, but the copper rarely becomes exposed from this. All you're doing is pushing around the *excess* tin. The important part of the tin is only a few atoms thick, and isn't really as effected by overheating as you seem to think. Here's a video where a tinsmith shows exactly what I'm talking about: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TciUEGxk2HE Despite melting the tin, the pan remains perfectly usable. The most harmful thing to do to a copper pan is to use metal utensils.

                2. The pan surface rarely needs to exceed 450 degrees. Contrary to what moronic cast iron users will tell you about "gettin that pan rippin hot to getchu a good sear," the Maillard reaction occurs most efficiently between 280-330 degrees. And as long as there is food in the pan, the temperature of the moisture in the food, boiling at a constant 212 degrees, will act as a buffer to the pan's temperature

                Not seeing it
                Your unlined copper set, that is

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Why would I have unlined copper pans?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Or tin lined pans, whichever

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What's your question?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I don't have one. Folks aren't using pure or tin lined copper pans here for everyday cooking.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I do. Look it's even dirty from my meal last night.
                The bottom is thicker than the walls. It holds heat really nicely.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                N=1

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >so powerless in real life
                >gets his kicks trying to shame random people for not complying with his every demand
                Poor little fella

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The little pan did nothing for you a stainless wouldn't do. Holding heat is not the technical selling point for copper, but responsiveness.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What are you referring to now?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Bud, you know about pans and pan performance. It's sad and obvious.

                A good copper pan will strike a balance between heat holding, responsiveness, and even heating.
                I know for a fact if I didn't tell you that the bottom was thicker than the sides you would tell me the pan was too thin and cheap.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If I thought they were worth having, I would probably invest in a set. I believe the performance is negligible.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Spoken like a true panlet.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You showed me a little pan, I'm not very impressed

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You asked for a picture of a copper pan, I posted one of my daily driver pans that is not small(almost 10" dia. rim), and you have been whining and making excuses ever since. You act like this in real life?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Nothing. The cooking surface is coated in tin so you don't eat parts of the statue of liberty. Otherwise, copper has good heating and cooling properties.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The vast majority of currently produced copper cookware is stainless, not tinned.
          Tin is only really common on vintage copper, or new copper that is marketed as vintage/heritage collections.

          Silver is another lining alternative, but it's obviously a lot more expensive.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >The vast majority of
            What point are you making?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              That tin is not particularly common in copper cookware today unless you're looking for it specifically.

              Walk into William Sonoma, and most copper cookware in there is stainless steel, not tin.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                And this matters because...?

                Walk into any cookware store, and most cookware is nonstick garbage.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It matters because the other post said
                > The cooking surface is coated in tin
                which generally, isn't true and hasn't been the case in 20-30 years.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >which generally, isn't true
                He's talking about tinned copper, which is the traditional lining material for copper pans.

                > and hasn't been the case in 20-30 years.
                You can walk into a Williams-Sonoma today and leave with tinned Ruffoni cookware, so I have no idea why "there are more stainless lined pans being sold, so therefore tinned pans are irrelevant" would be able to pose as an argument.

                There are lots of vintage pans that are still being used, re-tinned, and traded on the secondary market. Etsy and ebay are full of them, often for very affordable prices. There are a few small scale tinsmiths I'm aware of in the US that will restore an old pan for a nominal fee. You can get tinned Mauviel in restaurant thickness (2.5-3mm) if you order directly from France, and there's at least one kitchen store with an English site that makes this easy (E.Dehillerin). There are also a couple good copper cookware manufacturers that manufacture and sell in small batches domestically, such as Duparquet (interestingly, the current ownership is unrelated to the historical ownership, but quality is supposed to be very good), Brooklyn Copper Cookware and House Copper Cookware, off the top of my head. Baumalu is known for showing up randomly in discount stores, like TJ Maxx, although it's not the best quality.

                This cookware is available where it's available, and there's no real scarcity on the market. Just because it's not popular doesn't mean it's not relevant. The difference in conductivity between tinned copper and stainless-lined copper is substantial enough that a lot of people aren't even interested in paying that much for what is effectively an extra heavy stainless pan.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What's the delta between the two linings ?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >The difference in conductivity between tinned copper and stainless-lined copper is substantial enough
                No it's not.

                I own more than a dozen copper pieces, both tinned and stainless.

                The performance difference is there, but it's hardly noticeable outside of the most autistic frying or sauce prep.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >No
                >The performance difference is there, but
                What did she mean by this?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I disagree that the performance difference is substantial

                It's there, but it's not substantial.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >opinions

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                it's almost like the word substantial has a definition and the performance difference between tin and stainless isn't enough to meet the criteria for "substantial".

                if you just left it at, there is a performance difference, I wouldn't have bothered saying anything, but if you're going to say it's substantial, you just come off as a moron to anyone that actually owns both stainless and tinned copper.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >I'm bothered because my opinion isn't the same as yours

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                more like you're LARPing and trying to pretend your pan is somehow "better" because it has tin when the difference is negligible in 99% of cases.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >you're LARPing and trying to pretend
                Are you a real person?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >> The cooking surface is coated in tin
                >which generally, isn't true and hasn't been the case in 20-30 years.

                https://www.mauviel-boutique.com/19-m-tradition
                https://www.mauviel.com/produits/pdf/MAUVIEL_2845.pdf

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    get titanum coating

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    These are not actually ceramic. It's just a basic PTFE-based nonstick coating on an aluminum pan. Some of them have some kind of silica powder infused in the PTFE. Some have silicone coating. It's 0% ceramic, though. Ceramic is literally a glass coating that has to be baked on, and only works on very thick metals, like cast iron, since it will shatter and flake off as soon as a thinner pan gets dented

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Smoove as butter.
    for now. in about 2 months everything will stick.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I've had mine for a couple of years and they're fine
      Caraway brand

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah make one egg in that shite and it's stickier than a sticky on Culinaly

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You sound like you could burn water.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    pfas moment

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >it's a fricking joy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I fricking love nonstick!

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For me, it's cast iron and stoneware. And nonstick for pasta or rice.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's a meme
    PTFE will always been the best

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They wear out very quckly

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