Why does no one use these anymore. All cooking hipsters talk about is wetstones.

Why does no one use these anymore. All cooking hipsters talk about is wetstones.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    this is for honing the blade you nimrod

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I know, but where were wetstones 20 years ago.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        They've been around thousands of years

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          They definitely went out of fashion in the 18th century.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Restaurants hire people to come in and edge the knives. Most people just buy a new fricking knife unless they fricking love the knife they have.

        Hipsters who act like the knife they have is their lightsaber go through the trouble of all that other shit.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I hire your mom to come edge my knife.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Most people just buy a new fricking knife unless they fricking love the knife they have.
          In what fricking world are knives just treated like disposable objects? No one but the most profligate wasteful human being would think that way. Do you just throw away your silverware instead of cleaning it?
          It's dead easy to sharpen a blade. Knife sharpeners are cheap and they work. You're a fool.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You're right, people don't throw out knives when they get dull. They just keep using them for another 10 years and wonder why they hate making food at home. At some point they might buy a new set of knives and push the dull set to the back of the drawer and use those new knives without ever sharpening them for the next 10+ years. But I have never in my entire life known a person who sharpened their knives, it's something I've only ever seen talked about on the internet.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Kitchen knives are absurdly cheap. You can buy 10 utility knives for 50$, which is the price of a good whetstone and they'll serve you got a decade. Sharpening is not a necessity, it's something tidy people do. I worked in restaurants and they rarely sharpened their knives (pretty much only the chef and meatprepperguy did), its easier to buy them in bulk and toss when they get crappy.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            IME people just continue to use their dull fricking knives and think literally nothing of it.

            You're right, people don't throw out knives when they get dull. They just keep using them for another 10 years and wonder why they hate making food at home. At some point they might buy a new set of knives and push the dull set to the back of the drawer and use those new knives without ever sharpening them for the next 10+ years. But I have never in my entire life known a person who sharpened their knives, it's something I've only ever seen talked about on the internet.

            Exactly. The only people I know who sharpen their knives are ex-chefs and hunters.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              My parents are those people that don't think about their dull knives. I tested them and none have a working edge from heel to tip.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                My parents are also those people I sharpen their knives whenever I visit.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I got them a nice entry-level weeb knife for Christmas and they haven't used it yet. I've sharpened their knives twice, and I guess I'm going to have to do it next time I visit too.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                kek I did the same and they only use it on holidays. My dad makes a big show out of bringing it out. It's a nice feeling but the best part is it makes my sister seethe and that alone makes it worth every penny.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Most people I know (who cook) hone/sharpen, but a decent chunk have a self-sharpening block like

              [...]

              Also, (ex-)chefs are weird about sharpening. One bashes the edges of two knives, claims it's African-style???

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        They were a completely different tool for a completely different purpose, as they still are today.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >wet stone
        in a river probably

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I laughed

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yea but a lot of people will use a whetstone everyday because of the aesthetic.
      You really don't need to sharpen a knife that often and honing a blade will keep it relatively sharp for a long time, with daily use x2 a day I sharpen my knife maybe once every 2 months, instead just using a hone to keep it relatively sharp.
      Granted I'm just a home cook so it's not like I'm dulling it out too quick.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Most people I know still have these. They deliver results with extremely low levels of time and commitment and are best used on the softer steel knives most people have and which compromise most of the low cost end of the knife market. They're extremely practical, low cost, high yield and have an almost nonexistent time commitment. They just work.

        Whetstones are technically better but basically unnecessary for the vast majority of people.

        Do people other than enthusiasts/autists actually use whetstones? Not to mention the skill issue.
        My mom has 4 fricking stones yet her softer-steel knives are scratched and chipped as shit.
        I have to fix her stuff whenever I visit with pic related. I just give mine a few swipes every month on it.

        Restaurants hire people to come in and edge the knives. Most people just buy a new fricking knife unless they fricking love the knife they have.

        Hipsters who act like the knife they have is their lightsaber go through the trouble of all that other shit.

        You're right, people don't throw out knives when they get dull. They just keep using them for another 10 years and wonder why they hate making food at home. At some point they might buy a new set of knives and push the dull set to the back of the drawer and use those new knives without ever sharpening them for the next 10+ years. But I have never in my entire life known a person who sharpened their knives, it's something I've only ever seen talked about on the internet.

        Amazing how you correctly called out the knife autists while also writing the dumbest takes.
        Every single person I've asked sharpen their knives, mostly with a pull-through like

        https://i.imgur.com/Y4aasXY.png

        I just use pic related. Just werkz

        Why would most people ever talk about sharpening? It's just boring maintenance to normies.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          My mom has been using the same knives for my entire life without ever sharpening them. My grandparents all did the same thing. Every friend of mine doesn't sharpen their knives. It's literally only something I've seen on the internet.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Just because they're happy doing prep with the equivalent of a butter knife doesn't mean that's a good way to life.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              I never said it was good, I said that's just what the majority of people do. I'm not the guy who was griping about hipsters or whatever, I just agreed that people don't throw away knives, but the reason for that is they just keep using the same dull knives forever.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I started with a jig like this and appreciate the learning experience it gave me but whetstones produce a much nicer bevel and they're faster. Once proficient with a jig (understanding you have to be consistent and have good form), moving to whetstones was dead simple.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I just use the back of another knife

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i did this at the last airbnb i stayed in and it worked remarkably well. we did a lot of cooking on that trip and it was so nice to have one decently sharp knife. i've tried the bottom of the plate thing but it's never worked well for me

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My grandpa uses one of those.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    These are really only okay for quickly touching up softer steel knives, like a typical stainless kitchen knife. If you're a line cook, it's probably most useful. I wouldn't beat up my knives with even a ceramic honing rod because I have no issue taking the time to touch up my knives on whetstones instead.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cause they dont do shit

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >absolutely disfigures the knife
      >What??! this doesnt do anything!111
      >Ackshually it's for fixing a burr that shouldn't be there in the first place
      There's a reason these are mainly used by butchers, you can quickly touch up a softer knife that a butcher would typically use.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Why wouldn't he disfigure the knife someone in a way that might occur during regular use? Should he hone a brand new knife?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          you only hone an already sharp knife, so maybe

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      kek rodBlack folk been real quiet since this dropped

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      kek rodBlack folk been real quiet since this dropped

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65JzsDU_0mI
      Ceramic/Diamond and Whetstone bros...our response?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4ReQ83CZOQ
        Cause they dont do shit

        >i need a youtube Black person to form my opinion on a trivial subject
        pathetic, a scraper works be the very same principle and no one there claims
        >ey yo, the shit weve been doing for two centuries doesnt actually work.
        like with that you need a feel for pressure and that requires practice

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >BUT BUT LE YOUTUBE!!!!
          Not an argument.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            my point really way
            >have piece of dull hardened steel
            >form the most delicate cutting edge with essentially a honing rod
            >somehow doesnt apply to a knife shaped piece of hardened steel for reasons (skill issue)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/VYFciM9.jpg

      [...]
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65JzsDU_0mI
      Ceramic/Diamond and Whetstone bros...our response?

      >morons cutting paper
      Every fricking time

      Project Farm solved the issue fricking ages ago. Grams of force to cut a test kit wire. With control comparison so you can have apples to apples when making any statement.

      The conclusion that can be drawn is that knifes are factory sharpened to a bit over 200grams to cut, where razor blades are in the 100g range for the same cut.

      Rolling sharpeners like

      https://i.imgur.com/Y4aasXY.png

      I just use pic related. Just werkz

      cap at about 200g/cut, which means its factory sharp.
      The older non rolling version caps out at about 250-300g/cut, which is still the point where cutting tomatos feel nice.
      A good jig or a wetstone can do down to 90g/cut, or even lower on a knife made out of stiffer steel or with a sharper angle.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      not going to watch this moronic video
      however steels absolutely do shit. youve never taken a blunt knife, used it on a steel and then used it. i also own a whetstone. but i dont use it on my cheap shit knives, cant be arsed

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Whetstone*

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      *wet stone. You use water to help the gliding.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You're mom wet my stones last night

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Wet is (1) an adjective meaning covered or soaked in liquid, and (2) a verb meaning to make wet. Whet is a verb meaning to sharpen or to stimulate.

          Bluffing homosexual

          https://i.imgur.com/4KUufFx.jpg

          oof

          Yes, as in sharpen on a wet stone.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            ya mum slobbed on my wet knob, you doofus

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Wet is (1) an adjective meaning covered or soaked in liquid, and (2) a verb meaning to make wet. Whet is a verb meaning to sharpen or to stimulate.

        Bluffing homosexual

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your mom whet my stone last night

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You only have one ball? troony leave.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        oof

      • 2 months ago
        Shill

        you, sir, are a moron.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I hone before every use. Does not remove metal unlike a stone. Aligns and trues the edge so I need to sharpen,.and consequently remove metal, less frequently to enjoy a sharp blade.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Aligns and trues the edge
      It doesn't. Using a 'rod' shape is just stupid. A flat whetstone is obviously so much better.
      >But muh steel removal
      Touch ups don't remove much, ideally the less the better. Also those honing rods rip the shit out of edges. Why would you persist doing something so dumb?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It absolutely aligns the edge. I hold my knives to the light and if there's any reflections on the edge, a few passes with a ceramic rod takes care of them. I do this with german steels and VG10 as well and I think as long as you use smooth ceramic there's no danger of chipping. I'd notice if it tore the edge like you claim and it just doesn't work like that.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your standards must be low

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Excellent refutation of my observations. Do you think it doesn't align the edge just because you said so?

            This is a myth, honing rods remove a small amount, and they don't do it in a good way. Honing rods are a tradition that needs to die, people need to stop being scared of whetstones. It's better to 'hone' on a whetstone. The grit would depend on the steel and your personal preference but around 1k-3k for most stainless would be the equivalent of a ceramic honing rod and would be just as easy to use but produce far superior results. High hrc carbon steels can be finished even higher, around 6k-8k+.

            If it's good enough for pro chefs, it's good enough for everyone but the guy that takes microscopic pics of his edges and maybe Jiro.
            >verification not required

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >I prefer inferiority because it's tradition

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >it's good enough for everyone but the guy that takes microscopic pics of his edges
              He is my favorite Culinaly autist.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          ^^^
          this

          t. 30 years cooking and sharpening; strop too

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I just use pic related. Just werkz

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You sound vaccinated af bro

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Thanks?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        wtf, i trust the science now?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >being this terminally online

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Wtf does that even mean? Just go get another booster and take the l like a man, numbnuts.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Wtf does that even mean?
            it means the ratio of time you spend chatting shit about something online vs actually doing it is at least 100:1

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      you will probably get better results by scraping your knife against the unglazed bottom of a ceramic ware

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      this one is really good
      but Culinaly cant afford it

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Costs like $20 and cheaper versions made by different manufacturers obviously exist.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah but it just doesn't FEEL as good ya kno?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Who cares? It makes my knife sharp so I can cook my meals easier.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I use one. Despite what some people in this thread seem to think, they're not for sharpening your knife. They're for straightening the blade out.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Everyone who actually cooks here uses one, there's just nothing to talk about.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Millenials killed the whatever that thing is called market.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My mom used to carry one of these in her car "for emergencies". These days I just use a whet stone.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >hipsters
    OP confirmed for being 40+

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Most people I know still have these. They deliver results with extremely low levels of time and commitment and are best used on the softer steel knives most people have and which compromise most of the low cost end of the knife market. They're extremely practical, low cost, high yield and have an almost nonexistent time commitment. They just work.

    Whetstones are technically better but basically unnecessary for the vast majority of people.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    For the unedcuated, a honing steel (the rod thing) is for honing, which chefs may do several times a day, whenever their blade starts to give them some resistance. You are primarily realigning the blade, making its edge straight, rather than removing material and creating a new edge.

    You only need to actually sharpen the blade, ie. remove material via a whetstone or otherwise, every couple of months of hard use.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is a myth, honing rods remove a small amount, and they don't do it in a good way. Honing rods are a tradition that needs to die, people need to stop being scared of whetstones. It's better to 'hone' on a whetstone. The grit would depend on the steel and your personal preference but around 1k-3k for most stainless would be the equivalent of a ceramic honing rod and would be just as easy to use but produce far superior results. High hrc carbon steels can be finished even higher, around 6k-8k+.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm not getting out and wetting my whetstone just to do a couple passes before foodprep, instead of just a couple swipes on my rod

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Lazy ass

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Why not use a strop? I'm genuinely asking, I never thought to use mine on my kitchen knives.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Stropping rounds the edge. If you're going to strop, don't do out a lot. Stropping isn't obnoxiously damaging like a honing rod, but it's decreasing the flatness of the bevel, thus reducing the sharpness. A finishing whetstone gives superior results.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          stone Black folk want you to buy into the misery, so the obstruct the fact a 2$ strop does the same as a 400$ weeb stone

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Misery
            I think people hear whetstones take skill and assume it must be difficult and challenging and miserable, like climbing a hill. It's really not difficult. In fact, it's easier to properly use a whetstone than it would be to properly use a honing rod. It's much easier to push the bevel of the knife against the flat whetstone and scrap than to hold the knife at the proper angle against a honing rod. I don't understand how you could even think touching up a knife on a whetstone is much more of a chore than a honing rod, it would take 3 minutes at most and less than a minute in most cases. Why are people obsessed with the flashiness of using a honing rod?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              learn to read, that post was about strops
              a strop loaded with an f2000 compounds scrubs the floor with the most expensive shapton or naniwa polishing synthetics, for a fraction of the cost
              and im not even talking about diamond emulsions

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Scrubs the floor
                Maybe there's more skill to whetstones than I realize, I shouldn't assume everyone has a working brain.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                i see. cant argue against facts, moves to insults
                not making a strong point here

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It's not an insult, it's a fact

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >400$
            lol that's just a scam there's little reason to spend more than $15-$30 on any whetstone set.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              400$ is not even the entry fee to become an internet approves sharpening artist

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You could get started with only a $35 combination stone if you were trying to be super cheap

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                this will out you as a pleb thou. you shall not be judged on results but the gear you avatar gay with

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Not really, the standard for kitchen knives is actually pretty low compared to the straight razor autists. Kitchen knives perform best in the 1k to 3k grit whereas straight razor autists will be looking for the perfect 12k+ with the perfect scratch pattern for their own personal skin type. If you want to sharpen straight razors, the cost would be more like $200+ just for a single coticule or Japanese natural stone.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                coticules are actually dirt cheap, cheapest finisher you can find. The rectangular cut hones exist specifically to part fools from their money

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I use an 8 inch Victorinox. Should I get a whetstone?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Naniwa arata 800 and atoma 140 and you'll be set

  17. 2 months ago
    Baggie

    I still use one all the time.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That's only for honing, not sharpening you midwit

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    These things suck. Sharpening a knife requires creating a burr at the apex of the blade and then using increasingly finer grit surface to remove the burr. These honing rods are somewhat useful for the final step but worse than a simple leather strop. Save yourself looking like a moron and throw your honing rod in the trash. Get a 600 and 1200 grit diamond stone and a leather strop and be done with it. Then you will actually have sharp knives.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      is strop even necessary? My knives are sharp as frick after a 1000grit, I feel like stropping is just autism for le pretty knife

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    After I got done cramming it was too dirty and had to throw it out. I replaced it with a whetstone.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >that guy that doesn't strop, hone and sharpen
    Lmao moron

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lotta morons ITT would benefit from learning to sharpen a knife freehand with $40 worth of equipment and ditch all these gimmicks.

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Are these "hipsters" in the room with you right now?

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's amazing how youtube home cooks have the strangest ideas about everyone using whetstones and "no longer" using steels. Every boomer I've ever known has a knife block in their kitchen and no clue what the steel is for, so it's not like people "used" to use them. It's really only in the past 20 years or so with all the food shows that people finally started to realize what they're for. And most people don't even understand what they do; they just know they work, and in practical use have the same effect as sharpening, when in reality they do something completely different.

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What other kitchen gimmicks do you guys use?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Pot holders. There's literally no need for them if you know how to use proper technique.

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    How the frick am I supposed to sharpen my serrated knives with a whetstone, and if gliding each individual divot along the honing rod doesn't do shit, then what the frick am I supposed to do

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      How do you dull a bread knife?
      There are sharpening rods for serrated knives.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Same way any knife dulls.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >wrap sandpaper around pencil or any other tubular object
      >slide inside knife grooves to sharpen

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A good knife kit:

    Atoma 400
    Naniwa 600
    Naniwa Chosera 1000
    Suehiro Rika 5000
    Linen strop
    Leather strop
    Jeweler's pastes up to 20,000 grit
    Steel honing rod
    Blade guards for every knife
    Sink spanning stone holder
    Water bin for soaking stones
    Angle guides

    If you have meat cleavers, metal working files.

    Because I hone before using a knife, my blades stay razor sharp 6-12 months. Also keeps my outdoor tools sharp such as my Esee 6 and Victorinox pocket knife.

    I maintain sharp blades because they do the job better. Period. If you don't hone and are dispensing advice here, you may be an ignoramous.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      autism speaks its time to listen

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