Why is my bread flat instead of tall?

Why is my bread flat instead of tall?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Most likely either under-proofing, over-proofing or not having your oven hot enough.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's probably over-proofing. My first rise I let go for about an hour, which is standard. I let my second rise go for about the same. In my mind, the longer second proof the higher the dough will rise. That apparently isn't the case. It just spreads out vertically instead of horizontally. I'm also not using a dutch oven to cook it; just cooking it on baking sheets.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's probably over-proofing. My first rise I let go for about an hour, which is standard. I let my second rise go for about the same. In my mind, the longer second proof the higher the dough will rise. That apparently isn't the case. It just spreads out vertically instead of horizontally. I'm also not using a dutch oven to cook it; just cooking it on baking sheets.

      Just saw this [...]

      Yeah sounds like overproofing. It weakens the dough by creating too many air pockets I think. You probably don't have to let it rise very long for the second rise. With my slow rise doughs I'd let it rise for 8 hours and it'd be about doubled, then I'd shape it and let it rest for an hour before baking. It wouldn't really get much bigger on the pan but would rise a lot in the oven while baking.

      Does a mistake like that change the taste?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It was frankly still declines enough that I ate a half loaf by itself. It was a sundried tomato and Italian cheese bread though, so I imagine that factored into how good it was.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I think its underdeveloped gluten. It's squashing out into a blob instead of holding its shape

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        ^this, unless you fermented it for like 4-5 days it just wasn't worked enough

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        ^this, unless you fermented it for like 4-5 days it just wasn't worked enough

        I appreciate this feedback. I will look into ways to build more gluten development. I'm using a kitchen aid with a dough hook, and I'll be frank, the dough hook fricking sucks and doesn't do shit. I know it needs to be kneaded longer. I'll consider using a flat beater hook once it all comes together. I feel like that would work better. Also, mods are gays.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I'll put that feedback in it's proper place... FLUSH!

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          In my opinion unless you're doing some super high hydration rustic dough or like Rye that is just a b***h to work it's better to do it by hand than in the machine, easier to get the feel right when you're fully Hands On with it

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          if it gets above 75F or 24C turn the machine off, move the dough to the fridge for 30 minutes, or start with ice water

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Recipe? I seem to have better oven spring with slow rising doughs. I think maybe for quick rising doughs you have to bake them before they're fully risen but I'm not sure. Could never get faster doughs to turn out as well.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Just saw this

      It's probably over-proofing. My first rise I let go for about an hour, which is standard. I let my second rise go for about the same. In my mind, the longer second proof the higher the dough will rise. That apparently isn't the case. It just spreads out vertically instead of horizontally. I'm also not using a dutch oven to cook it; just cooking it on baking sheets.

      Yeah sounds like overproofing. It weakens the dough by creating too many air pockets I think. You probably don't have to let it rise very long for the second rise. With my slow rise doughs I'd let it rise for 8 hours and it'd be about doubled, then I'd shape it and let it rest for an hour before baking. It wouldn't really get much bigger on the pan but would rise a lot in the oven while baking.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's a two part yeasted dough.

      >night before
      >1/2 cup water
      >1/2 cup flour
      >1 tsp yeast
      >1 tsp sugar
      >let set in fridge overnight

      >following day
      >1 packet yeast
      >3/4 cup water
      >2 tsp sugar
      >2 tsp salt
      >3 cup flour
      >3 tbsp oil

      >mix until doesn't stick to hands
      >proof in oiled bowl until double in size
      >when 1st proof done, add whatever additional ingredients you want
      >divine into two loafs
      >2nd proof until double in size
      >spray with water
      >bake at 400f for 20 minutes, turning and spraying again half way

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        neglected to mention adding the previous day's starter to following day's dough

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        into two loafs

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Leprosy bread

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The answer to your question is clear, it's because you're a homosexual.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    sloppa

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