Why isnt my bread "fluffy"?

I tried to make myself some olive bread. It tastes delicious but the interior of the bread became very dense.
Any tips for the future?

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

Tip Your Landlord Shirt $21.68

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You didn't give the dough enough time to ferment or used bad yeast, and it's over hydrated

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You forgot to add the yeast

      I gave it a table spoon of dry yeast and about 2 hours to rest.

      that looks delicious, well done op 10/10

      Thank you 😀 but I wish it had turned out more fluffy.. I made a little sandwich with it and it was very nice.

      Passover is over, anon, you can eat leavened bread again

      >Passover
      ?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        did you add too hot water and killed the yeast? did you add salt directly to the yeast and also killed it? did you not rest or proof the dough?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >did you add salt directly to the yeast
          Uhm... well I mixed the yeast with water and sugar. And then I threw in salt before I added anything else because I didnt want to forget about it later down the road. I didnt know that would kill the yeast
          Water was room temp

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Salt won't kill the yeast. Maybe slow it down a little bit not kill it

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Salt won't kill the yeast. Maybe slow it down a little bit not kill it
              what if i add 1kg of salt

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It will only make the yeast stronger

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              it is know salt kills/inhibits yeast

              >did you add salt directly to the yeast
              Uhm... well I mixed the yeast with water and sugar. And then I threw in salt before I added anything else because I didnt want to forget about it later down the road. I didnt know that would kill the yeast
              Water was room temp

              the italian pizzaiolo way is mix water and a bit of salt
              then add just enough flour til the mixture becomes like a batter
              then you add your yeast
              the flour makes a buffer and th yeast can do its work

              2 hours i not enough time for flufy bread

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            next time bring the water up to 110 degrees fahrenheit before mixing it with the yeast and sugar and wait for it to start bubbling a bit before adding in the salt and then the flour

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >wait for it to start bubbling a bit
              I will try, thanks!

              yeast is a living thing, treat it accordingly.
              Flour, oliveoil, water, yeast, knead. Rest for 1 hr.
              Portion, wait, 1 hr
              Sprinkle a like oil, thyme, burn that baby

              To improve fermentation you can add some kind of syrup. Maple syrup, corn syrup, honey... This is easier for the yeast to digest than sugar. I get great pizza dough in under 1 hour when I add a little syrup.

              I actually added a tea spoon of honey too, yeah. But in hindsight, I wonder if the dry yeast had maybe just gone bad. I took it from my parent's place last time I visited them and there was no expiration date on the box. It could have been sitting there for a while now...

              looks amazing, 10/10, heck i’d give it a 11/10 if i could, ah what the hey, ill give it a 11/10

              Thank you! 😀

              Jesus fricking christ it looks like cheese
              Heat water to 95 to 100f
              Add water, salt and sugar < your dry mix
              Im not going to bother handing out (You)s but whoever said not to add salt with yeast because it "kills it" youre a fricking moron, stop posting, I used to make bread for a living
              once the dry is in the water cover with cling wrap and wait for 10 minutes, then add flour and mix, dont mix for too long, just a few minutes tops
              transfer to a new bowl and cover with cling wrap, let rest for 1.5 to 2 hours, maybe degassing once, depending on ambient temp, then move to the refrigerator or freezer, I dont freeze my dough but if you do thats fine
              I recommend letting the dough cool for 18 to 24 hours but you can pull it out before then, adds flavor
              Also dont put shit in your fricking dough you fricking clown, what are those, olives?

              Well it was supposed to be... olive bread. And it certainly gave it a good taste. Also sorry to ask but what is a dry mix? My ESL mind cant comprehend that and when I search for it it shows me fking concrete.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >What's dry mix
                The dry mix is the yeast/sugar/salt mix that goes into the warm water to start the yeast reaction, if youre using instant yeast you dont have to wait 10 minutes, you can go right from dumping the dry mix to mixing in the flour
                >But its olive bread!
                Yeah, I know what you were trying to do, dont, you want to put olives in a dish/on a sandwich thats fine, do that

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Yeah, I know what you were trying to do, dont
                Whats so bad about it?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                a bit of olive oil on the dough is fine, that anon is moronic

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              This. You typically don't need to, but your problem might be the yeast is old and dead which is one of the main reasons people proof. If you don't bake much that could certainly be your issue

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              tempts that high will kill yeast
              i think its like 98.6 max or so

              i do this plus a bi of sugar to wake the yeast up

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Municipal water is full of chloramine, a disinfectant which kills yeast. Ruined many loafs of bread with that shit.

            Pre-mix your water with an equal volume of flour before adding yeast, the gluten will react with the chloramine and neutralize it

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              I haven't made a loaf in ages but I recall always using bottled water because there is something in tap water that could potentially kill the yeast or something.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        you ate that?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I gave it a table spoon of dry yeast and about 2 hours to rest.

        Sometimes the yeast is dead or 95% dead. it is a living organism it can die or expire. sometimes you just get unlucky maybe it was stored unproperly or you were using a cheap brand?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah thank you it was the yeast. See

          Ok I bought new yeast and im doing it again. The yeast is still expanding (its about 1.5hrs since I let it rest) and the dough expanded way more than last time.
          My yeast was probably dead..
          Also I threw in some "malt" or something that I saw in the store. Apparently helps the yeast grow

          Its currently in the oven and it already filled out the pot I put it in. I hope I didnt take too much yeast.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >overhydrated
      meme

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Means something real but is not remotely OP's problem

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You forgot to add the yeast

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    that looks delicious, well done op 10/10

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >that looks delicious
      Yeah, for a cheese.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Passover is over, anon, you can eat leavened bread again

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    yeast is a living thing, treat it accordingly.
    Flour, oliveoil, water, yeast, knead. Rest for 1 hr.
    Portion, wait, 1 hr
    Sprinkle a like oil, thyme, burn that baby

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    looks amazing, 10/10, heck i’d give it a 11/10 if i could, ah what the hey, ill give it a 11/10

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    To improve fermentation you can add some kind of syrup. Maple syrup, corn syrup, honey... This is easier for the yeast to digest than sugar. I get great pizza dough in under 1 hour when I add a little syrup.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jesus fricking christ it looks like cheese
    Heat water to 95 to 100f
    Add water, salt and sugar < your dry mix
    Im not going to bother handing out (You)s but whoever said not to add salt with yeast because it "kills it" youre a fricking moron, stop posting, I used to make bread for a living
    once the dry is in the water cover with cling wrap and wait for 10 minutes, then add flour and mix, dont mix for too long, just a few minutes tops
    transfer to a new bowl and cover with cling wrap, let rest for 1.5 to 2 hours, maybe degassing once, depending on ambient temp, then move to the refrigerator or freezer, I dont freeze my dough but if you do thats fine
    I recommend letting the dough cool for 18 to 24 hours but you can pull it out before then, adds flavor
    Also dont put shit in your fricking dough you fricking clown, what are those, olives?

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bad yeast, or you killed the yeast by adding water over 120.
    you didnt let it proof or you overproofed and it fell

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeast was either dead, or it was too cold wherever you left the dough to rise.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    nice cookie

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The yeast know you're gay.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Frick are you the same guy who made the strawberry cake? grim

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Idk what youre talking about, sorry. I made a really nice cake once but I dont think I posted it. It was with like plums or sth

      you ate that?

      I dont like wasting food

      Did you overwork the dough? Looks like a cake when you over mix the batter. It has no crumb.

      >overwork the dough
      You mean you can kneat a dough too much? O.o

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did you overwork the dough? Looks like a cake when you over mix the batter. It has no crumb.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    buy new yeast motherfricker, this shit won't fly. i'd feed this to the birds but its so dense they wouldn't be able to fly after eating it

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ok I bought new yeast and im doing it again. The yeast is still expanding (its about 1.5hrs since I let it rest) and the dough expanded way more than last time.
    My yeast was probably dead..
    Also I threw in some "malt" or something that I saw in the store. Apparently helps the yeast grow

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pic from above (its not done yet). Doesnt look really "even" but alas, cant have it all with an amateur like me. Maybe too much yeast, maybe pot was too small or too much of everything

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      underproofed

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        not enough fermentation or proof time.
        poorly shaped, lack of gluten development
        not baked long enough

        the general rules for your bakers percentages are:
        yeast 1%
        salt 2%
        hydration 65-85%
        so a basic loaf would be
        400g flour, 4g yeast, 8g salt, 260-340g water.

        this dough looks salvageable if you bake it a bit longer, it's more important to try and fail and learn from your mistakes than anything any homosexual on this site could tell you.

        Yeah as I said its not done yet. Still in the oven. I just took a little pic (:
        >yeast 1%
        >salt 2%
        >hydration 65-85%
        >so a basic loaf would be
        >400g flour, 4g yeast, 8g salt, 260-340g water.
        Sounds about right. From what I learned, the amount of water depends on the type of flour. I used type 503 wheat (name or definition varies per country, this is the German definition) and I used about 380ml for ~500g flour (measured with a table spoon bc I dont have any kitchen scale). 1 big tea spoon of salt, 7g yeast and some other stuff like malt, olives (again), sugar, honey.
        >it's more important to try and fail and learn from your mistakes than anything any homosexual on this site could tell you.
        I agree 😀 Im still rather new to baking (anything beyond a simple cake) but its so much fun.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Get a fricking scale.

          t. Burger that can bake

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I probably should, yeah. But my rough guesstimate seemed good enough.
            Bread next to the pot. Its really a chonker but it looks good to me. Thank you for the advices 🙂

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You’re doing good for a beginner, but you’re making things infinitely more difficult by not having the most necessary tool. A scale. Here are white cross buns I made for Easter.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >white
                *hot

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                They look really good! Just by looks I can tell the mustve been very soft and delicious. Good job fren.

                Pic rel is the interior of my bread. Id say it looks better than last time and it feels less dense when I eat it.
                Also... do you happen to know how I could store the bread the most efficient way? I thought Id take half of the loaf to my parents place on mother's day. But thats still like a day and a half and I dont want the bread to get too hard or go bad (although I doubt it would happen this fast)

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >store the bread
                My best advice, and what I do is use a bread box. This is likely of little use to you because I assume you don’t have one. You want to put into some sort of container that is just slightly breathable. Also, I try to use a slice of bread to protect the sliced side of the bread and wedge it against the side of the container. Home baked bread varies a lot on how long it remains fresh, it will likely still be good in a day and a half.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Im a bit worried because of the olives I put in. They are kinda moist and I am afraid its a magnet for germs. You were right to assume I dont have a bread box, nor any freezer bags so I just wrapped the half for my parents in a billion layers of saran wrap, tried to get as much air out as possible and put it into the freezer. I hopes its enough for the that time.
                (And i put the remains of my half into the normal cooler, I heard its bad for the taste but such is life. I really dont want it to go bad, I shouldve prepared better).
                Can you recommend me any type of bread box? I read varying recommendations online. Also some people claimed they used clay pots and what not which seemed a bit over the top

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The freezer was a good decision most likely. Pic related is the bread box I have. I’ve had it for six months, and it’s been great for me. I purchased it after months of struggling with plastic wrap and bags, it’s superior to anything I tried before.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I would also like to recommend a website to you, it helped me a lot in the beginning of learning to bake.
                https://sallysbakingaddiction.com/

                Thank you! I will look into both of these. Its 2AM for me, Im very happy with the result but I should probably go to sleep now. I also made chocolate brownies, they taste reaaally good too but theyre nothing "special"
                Good night fren 😀

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Good night fren

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I would also like to recommend a website to you, it helped me a lot in the beginning of learning to bake.
                https://sallysbakingaddiction.com/

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Just wrap it in a towel and finish eating it in three days or so. I'd also suggest keeping away from breadboxes. They're a breeding ground for mold.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I’ve had no mold problems with many breads remaining soft for 5 days. My bread box has small vent holes.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Based learner, ygmi. OP pic was signature underproofing. Always go by texture for dough mixing and kneading and size for proofing, don't stick hard to the time a recipe gives.
                >about 2 hours
                >about 8 minutes
                These are extremely "about" and can easily be off target by 50% depending on a number of conditions including room temperature, humidity, how old your yeast is, how shitty and slow your kneading technique is.

                Pic is a fruit and nut bread I made a while back, I love bread with a lot of stuff in it. Keep at it, olive-anon., don't let the bakelets get to you. I'd say you could even mix some salami bits and cheese in there too, make a full charcuterie loaf.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      not enough fermentation or proof time.
      poorly shaped, lack of gluten development
      not baked long enough

      the general rules for your bakers percentages are:
      yeast 1%
      salt 2%
      hydration 65-85%
      so a basic loaf would be
      400g flour, 4g yeast, 8g salt, 260-340g water.

      this dough looks salvageable if you bake it a bit longer, it's more important to try and fail and learn from your mistakes than anything any homosexual on this site could tell you.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Looks much better though, I’m sure you’ll work the kinks out.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Current pic. I think its almost done

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This used to happen to me when I first started. It could be the yeast but in general baking is more chem when first learning than cooking. Buy a scale and follow instructions precisely. In time you'll learn to eyeball it.

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you have an oven or bread machine, use it for proofing. Or get a proofing box. Your yeasty boys need a warm temp to do their job. Don't forget to verify your yeasty boys are alive and well by blooming them first in hot water (100 deg F) with sugar.

    Don't have time to proof? Cold proof then for 24-48 hours! It takes planning though.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *