why not using a surgical scalpel to cut your food, especially for delicate tasks where you need a really sharp knife (filleting fish, scoring the surf...

why not using a surgical scalpel to cut your food, especially for delicate tasks where you need a really sharp knife (filleting fish, scoring the surface, etc)? They are incredibly sharp, even sharper than the fanciest chef knives, and the replacement blades are dirt cheap.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    cus I don't like blood

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why did you kill a thread for this moronic bullshit, Anon? Seriously, even a McDonald's thread is more valuable than this

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >not using a laser for these tasks

    Pleb detected

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They get dull real fast

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      how fast? even if you have to replace the blade very often, you can buy a 100 pack for like 15 bucks.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's not worth the time effort and waste. Their cutting ability is only good when making incisions, not much else. Surgeons wish they could use a big hefty knife but it would kill their patients.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Surgeons wish they could use a big hefty knife but it would kill their patients.
          Sounds more like a skill issue rather than a big hefty knife issue

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Oh uh also, you could probs finish making one meal with it. Scalpel blades are usually replaced during surgery even.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's actually not a bad idea. I actually do use scalpels, but only as steak knives. They cut through even the nastiest well done steak like it's room-temp butter

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Because normal sharpened knife does the same thing except it's cheaper and you can actually re-sharpen it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Because normal sharpened knife does the same thing
      it takes a lot of effort to keep a kitchen knife at a similar level of sharpness
      >except it's cheaper
      a blade holder is like $5, and the blades cost 10-20 cents each.
      I wonder how often you would have to replace them for normal kitchen use.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Once or twice for every meal you cook. And then for three people at most.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I work in a pathology lab and use scalpels all the time. They dull really quickly even cutting soft tissue. They’re also so thin that I’ve had blades crack and break while cutting formalin fixed muscle and tendon. They could be used to cut sashimi I guess, but I don’t think you could cut a single carrot or potato with one.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          So scalpels are single use only? (Blade) also im wondering what other variants are there and if there's an advantage over using ceramic over the normal ones

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            They're specialized to do one thing really well, that being slicing through soft tissue with minimal damage to the tissue around the cut. The blades are incredibly thin, and can be easily bent with just your fingers. They are not designed to be durable or to chop through anything, and are only about 1.5 inches long at most. They would be maybe the worst possible blade to try to do kitchen prep. A box cutter would work better.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >it takes a lot of effort to keep a kitchen knife at a similar level of sharpness
        enough said, real cook here
        considers it work to sharpen a knife

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'd argue that box cutter is sharper than a surgical blade. Also it gets fricked real fast.
    Also it is too small. You won't dig a hole in ground using a spoon.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      sure you will. it might not be a huge hole though.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine sharpening a knife when box cutters exist. I guess some people are just stupid and it can’t be helped

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think the only odd things I do when I cook are using nitrile gloves when handling food directly or using welding gloves for any hot dishes.

    Really, I don't get why more people don't use welding gloves. They're as cheap as most oven mitts and are way nicer to use. Plus they look cool.
    Got this pair for like $16.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I use the pot holders I have because I got them for free. But I will honestly consider this whenever they wear out (one of them is already halfway there.)
      Never using nitrile gloves though.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    maybe if I was cooking miniature food for miniature people

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I occasionally use a safety razor blade to score a loaf of bread. There’s not much else I can imagine a scalpel being good for, but razor blades are cheaper and easier to acquire. I have a Japanese petty knife that I keep nearly as sharp and is preferable in just about every way for small, precision tasks.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    sharpen your fricking knives. I get them sharp once then touch them up on a stone. Worse case scenario is I hone them on a belt sander initially...Just send all your knives out and buy a stone. The likelihood you need to send them out to a knife sharpener service are high. Theyre around since alot of restaurants contract a sharpening service.

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