Beginner help

Beginner cooker here
whats some healthy tasty stuff thats easy to make
right now I just default to stacking some form of carbs (noodles, pasta, rice)
with some meat (usually sausage or chicken thighs)
and frozen veggies
the only seasoning I do is salt + pepper

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It sounds like you're basically doing it right already: protein, starch, vegetable. What is it you're looking to change or improve?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      something to improve flavour i guess
      its not bad but I feel like i could be doing better
      i was thinking about the different kinds of sauces you can put on stuff like curries or some pasta sauce
      I basically only buy canned pasta sauce

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sauce based things generally are generally pretty hard to frick up so that might be a good place to start. Curries are easy if you can follow instructions and there's tons of video recipes on YT if you need further help.
        If you're looking for quick/less prep, grab some simmer sauces from the grocery store. Patak's brand is good for Indian, Frontera has good Mexican flavors. Find something you like and then learn how to make it from scratch.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Baggie

        You could try to start incorporating fresh produce into your dishes. I mean that's a huge rabbit hole, but you're probably ready for it. Baking a potato is easy as frick, but you could dice that potato and boil it then drain and mash it with some butter and milk, or next time you're making a jarred pasta sauce you could dice up some onions and/or peppers maybe mushrooms and garlic. get that all sauteed before heating the sauce in the same pot. You could prepare fresh salads and get more comfortable with chopping up the different kinds of vegetables. Continuing down this path you'll find yourself using fresh herbs and combining different flavors. Soon enough it becomes wintertime and you're creating your own marinades and rubs with dried spices, making your own sauces. Yeah you're still going to use frozen and canned vegetables, but if you're looking for improvement in your skill, that's probably a great place to start because the results will happen quickly and be very noticeable.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sounds like you are on the right track already. maybe start investing in some pre-made spice mixes, to find what you like. maybe try some fresh veggies instead of frozen occasionally.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you're a bachelor I think hamburger helper can be an easy tasty dish to make for yourself. I don't think there's anything unhealthy about it either.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Otherwise what else, some stupid b***h cooking for you and too lazy to clean some dishes?

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    One has to be a stupid silly c**t to let some b***h cook for you.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's could be worse, some b***h cooking for you or cleaning your dishes or both?

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Try out the family size, it has 2x the meat.
    Spar out with Morticia for the last bite.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That sounds pretty good already. Anything with protein and vegetables is gonna be about as healthy as a regular meal gets unless you’re drowning it in butter/oil/sauce. Frozen/canned vegetables are fine imo, they’re easy to portion and re-store and you can steam them, boil them, or lightly sauté/pan fry them, but if you want to step up your cooking game consider buying fresh vegetables. Bell peppers and onions are great for pan frying, fresh broccoli is easy to steam, mushrooms are great to sauté, etc.. Chicken breasts are lean and easy to cook (but easy to overcook as well), ground beef can be used for a whole variety of dishes (burgers, meatloaf, pasta, tacos). If you’re good with meal prepping, large roasts are super easy to make in a slow cooker, either doing a slow roast with potatoes and various vegetables or just filling the pot with stock and letting it cook for 12 hours, that’ll be enough protein for a week or more so you could meal prep a whole set of vegetables to go with it or prepare them at meal time like normal.

    If all you’re doing is trying to step your cooking game up then I’d say continue doing what you’re doing but change it up a little bit each time to branch out and see what you like versus how complex it is to make. You might find that recipes online call for a whole bunch of ingredients in a way that takes a decent amount of effort to make which might not be practical for a one-time meal, so just take some inspiration from what you see and experiment a little.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >go on youtube
    >find some big foodtuber e.g. Chef John, Weissman, whatever
    >find recipe that seems good
    >make it
    >rinse repeat

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If you’re gonna do this as a beginner, it’d probably be best to find recipes tailored to beginners. It’s frustrating to see a video that claims to be targeted towards beginners only to have them break out niche tools like potato ricers and food processors all while using every vegetable in the supermarket aisle and 5 different pots and pans for one chicken breast and a side of vegetables, or whatever. Beginners should be learning what spices go well with one another and how to properly cook different food items using basic methods, jump cutting and glossing over important steps isn’t very helpful.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just do what Chef John tells you

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Beginner cooker here
    >the only seasoning I do is salt + pepper

    This is the #1 mistake I see beginner home cooks make: they don't have a spice rack and they don't have any spices. The key to home cooking is having a pantry full of ingredients ready to roll, that way all you need to do is go to the grocery store occasionally and buy fresh meat and produce/bust open the fridge or freezer and all the sudden you have an entire meal at your fingertips. Either buy a spice drawer divider, a wall mounted spice rack, a tabletop spice rack, or pull out wire mesh bins with optional wheels. Then, buy one of those spice bottle packages with labels and a funnel, go to your local Asian grocery store or go on Amazon and buy bulk spices. Do not buy those individual small bottles of spices, those are rip off. Spend an entire day funneling your spices into neatly labeled, uniform bottles. Bing bang boom, you're ready to make any meal you want, you just need the perishables.

    Let's take for instance your lasagna that you pictured. Instead of buying the frozen TV dinner variant, you could easily make it yourself if you had all the spices ready to go beforehand. On top of that, if you also prepared and have a bunch of dried pasta variants in your pantry, ground beef in your freezer, canned tomatoes, and cheese in your fridge, you wouldn't even have to leave the house. A lasagna dinner is a simple 5 min YouTube video of instructions away. And after you eat your fill, you fridge up a portion and put the rest in the freezer, now you've got a meal for tomorrow and also any time you want, ready to defrost.

    Bonus: if you get menu fatigue easily, you can do all different kinds of dishes with essentially the same ingredients. Tacos, spaghetti and meatballs, empanadas; all with a couple extra easy to get pantry staples.

    Tldr; don't be lazy, buy once and cry once; get a spice rack and bottles, stock up your pantry, fridge, and freezer, and you'd be shocked how easy home cooking is.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I dice two red potatoes and toss it in an air fryer for 15 mins. While that's going I blast diced chicken meat + mushrooms in some water in a pan. When the water has evaporated I add some butter and extra virgin olive oil.

    Put your fries on a plate and pour the oily chicken+mushroom goodness over it.

    No matter what spices you use this always tastes super fricking good - and is supposedly healthy. I add some ketchup tho.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      no need to peel the potatoes ofc. And always get red, a lot more health shit and potassium in it. Most people are potassium deficient.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      also even the all metal air fryers are cheap so avoid the plastic ones. Why tf do people cook food in plastic.

      I have now uploaded everything I know about cooking. Enjoy

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